Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
161 - 180 of 297 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
Discussion Starter · #161 · (Edited)
Costco sell the steel ARCAN 3 Tonne Jack, it is really heavy, very solid, pretty low at the load end and good value. You could bolt a cradle to the load saddle to better fit the transmission.
At 35Kg it's heavier than the gearbox it would be lifting.... :ROFLMAO:

Do they do a cradle for that specific jack or are there more generic ones available?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
Discussion Starter · #162 ·
Is there anywhere like this that's closer? Auto DIY - self-service garage for hire - Glasgow
Yes, but I'm reluctant to be working "on the clock" on a job I've never done before (unknown unknowns) away from my own collection of tools etc. (Can't take everything with me..)

The car also can't be driven there at the moment (and I'm the only driver in the immediate family anyway) so repairing it anywhere other than at home would require arranging the car to be trailered there. Any issue encountered that required the ordering of parts or tools not readily available locally would put me in a bind as the car would be disassembled on somebody's pay by the hour hoist potentially for days!

Not a situation I'd want to get stuck in that's for sure. I considered the same pros and cons when I did the traction battery drop on the Ion and decided that although more difficult to do it at home I could take my time and pick away at it bit by bit. I don't care if it takes a few evenings to get the job done if I can work on it around other activities.

The main thing to avoid is going down a disassembly path that can't be completed successfully - hence trying to work out the physical logistics of it all and make sure I don't come up with a scheme that isn't workable.

If I need to buy a decent Jack so be it - I need a better jack anyway and I will make good use of it in future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
576 Posts
Yes, but I'm reluctant to be working "on the clock" on a job I've never done before (unknown unknowns) away from my own collection of tools etc. (Can't take everything with me..)

The car also can't be driven there at the moment (and I'm the only driver in the immediate family anyway) so repairing it anywhere other than at home would require arranging the car to be trailered there. Any issue encountered that required the ordering of parts or tools not readily available locally would put me in a bind as the car would be disassembled on somebody's pay by the hour hoist potentially for days!

Not a situation I'd want to get stuck in that's for sure. I considered the same pros and cons when I did the traction battery drop on the Ion and decided that although more difficult to do it at home I could take my time and pick away at it bit by bit. I don't care if it takes a few evenings to get the job done if I can work on it around other activities.

The main thing to avoid is going down a disassembly path that can't be completed successfully - hence trying to work out the physical logistics of it all and make sure I don't come up with a scheme that isn't workable.

If I need to buy a decent Jack so be it - I need a better jack anyway and I will make good use of it in future.
Can't you just Rac it etc ? Rover to there. Surely you have breakdown cover
 

·
Premium Member
2014 Model S
Joined
·
8,078 Posts
Can't you just Rac it etc ? Rover to there. Surely you have breakdown cover
Home breakdown has mileage limits usually. Even some of the national recovery ones limit where the car can go and usually it means you have to go with the car as well as they offer the one destination.
 

·
Registered
Hyundai Ioniq 28
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
Over the years I have used a variety of Heath Robinson devices to raise a car. The most successful, and least dodgy, involved two long scaffold boards to create long ramps to the desired height and four or six foundation blocks as high end supports. Then run the car up the ramp. I then jacked up the low end of the ramp boards using a linked H steel beam and a central lift. Then inserted more foundation blocks at the newly raised end to create a raised bed of the two boards that was high enough to work under. Very solid and with the car's mass sat right over the support blocks to avoid board sag.

Edit. Just checked YT and found this Sealey solution that is identical to my DIY solution.


LOL - And another that uses the same process.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,465 Posts
At 35Kg it's heavier than the gearbox it would be lifting.... :ROFLMAO:

Do they do a cradle for that specific jack or are there more generic ones available?
Yes, the weight of the jack will be your friend. Hopefully it will on very flat smooth concrete or a large steel sheet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
There are stops - two stages - and it would be possible to remove the jacks. The frightening part is the first few inches of lift as the mechanical advantage is at its least and the jack force it greatest. Once it's up to working height the stresses are lower. They are four tonne jacks! :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
Ok not being funny here but why are you faffing with shipment to Cleevely?
Book it in, and then a few days before go for a good drive and then breakdown. Your nissan recovery will kick in and you can nominate they take it to Cleevely.
If they wont or you dont have nissan cover due to lack of servicing at nissan, then use the AA or such. it will be a LOT cheaper, and then just get a train down to pick it up. They are still running and could always use it as an excuse to go down on a friday to pick the car up and have a long adventure weekend away with the family. Train down, and drive back up, maybe overnight in the lakes or such.
Did anything come of investigating the upgraded part that someone was making as while that box is off i would be looking to get an uprated part into it now...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I don’t have anything to add but that as a fellow driveway mechanic I totally sympathise with you.

My highest accomplishment is a HV battery repair of an Ampera, and that took some planning with cheap ramps on concrete blocks etc. to get it just about high enough to get the battery lowered. If I had to do it again, I’d probably build ramps from wood with removable middle section like in this post in thread 'Barry's 18x20 Garage' https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/threads/barrys-18x20-garage.51370/post-1769762
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
Discussion Starter · #176 · (Edited)
Ok not being funny here but why are you faffing with shipment to Cleevely?
I'm not. They're fully booked for the next month and running short staffed so I've decided to tackle the job myself. I'll probably regret it but that's the plan now. ;) I have a few "tools" on order to help me do the job.
Book it in, and then a few days before go for a good drive and then breakdown. Your nissan recovery will kick in and you can nominate they take it to Cleevely.
If they wont or you dont have nissan cover due to lack of servicing at nissan, then use the AA or such. it will be a LOT cheaper, and then just get a train down to pick it up. They are still running and could always use it as an excuse to go down on a friday to pick the car up and have a long adventure weekend away with the family. Train down, and drive back up, maybe overnight in the lakes or such.
Did anything come of investigating the upgraded part that someone was making as while that box is off i would be looking to get an uprated part into it now...
To be honest I can't think of anything worse to spend my time doing than driving a broken car on purpose until it completely breaks down! Your choice maybe but not mine...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
To be honest I can't think of anything worse to spend my time doing than driving a broken car on purpose until it completely breaks down! Your choice maybe but not mine...
I drove our Passat from Edinburgh to the g'box specialist in Falkirk. My dad followed with a tow rope just in case. It was a nail biting journey :LOL:

Years before that I had to drive the Landrover to the specialist with it stuck in 2nd gear low ratio, took a while o_O
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
Discussion Starter · #179 · (Edited)
I've been keeping a low profile as I've been working on doing the gearbox swap on my driveway....(about half way through) but I thought I would share a picture of the drain plug when draining the oil from the gearbox:

147422


Yeah that gearbox is goosed...and I don't think an oil change will save it... :ROFLMAO: At least 4 large curved very sharp shards of shiny steel - on the order of 8mm long by 3mm in diameter each. And I haven't even checked the level plug - which also has a magnet in these gearboxes...

Anyone game to take a guess at where the shards come from? Given their curvature and size I'm sticking with the chipped gear theory...

I drained the oil into a measuring jug and got exactly 1.4 litres so it wasn't short on oil. The oil is completely black and opaque so I don't know how much other metallic residue might be in it.

Of course Murphy had to throw a spanner in the works - in the last 2 days while the Leaf has been up on stands the 12v battery has gone completely dead - it was right down to 4v which was too low for my intelligent charger to believe it is a car battery and not a motorcycle battery. :(

I had to use my hobby RC charger to start the charging and get the voltage high enough for the other charger to believe it was a car battery. Chances are discharging so low has done permanent damage (Lead Acid batteries don't like full discharges) so I may be up for a new 12v battery at the end of this which is a shame as I've had no problems at all with the 12v battery in this Leaf.

The car had already sat for 3 weeks without being used with no sign of 12v battery discharge, (and I occasionally used the timed climate control which would give the 12v battery a 15 minute charge session) so I think what has caused it is following the procedure to disable the parking brake.

Normally you can't turn off the car without the parking brake locking automatically, for removal of the gearbox you don't really want the parking brake engaged - the Nissan procedure to avoid this is to put the car in neutral then pull a certain fuse under the bonnet before turning the car off - this cuts power to the parking brake actuator.

However I had noticed that while on the car was constantly complaining about "put the car into park" after I did this and I'm guessing that the ECU in charge of operating the parking brake did not go to sleep when the car was turned off as it was still monitoring the parking brake status. Hence the battery went flat. Argh!! So if you disable the parking brake using the Nissan recommended fuse pulling method make sure you disconnect the 12v battery soon after.

Anyway, back to work...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,509 Posts
And this is a low mileage vehicle as well?!? I'd be tempted to say its had a few traffic light grandprixes or just a hell of a lot of very short trips in its life.

Generally the fluid and bits like that are generally when boxes have got higher up in the milage for the same age. usually about 60k so just after the warranty and on taxi's as well..
 
161 - 180 of 297 Posts
Top