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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Warning, long post! :)

I'm looking for a bit of practical advice and info from owners of the 30kWh Leaf, especially if you also have owned a C-Zero/Ion/i-Miev.

Some will know I've been driving a Peugeot Ion daily for 3 years (along with a seldom used ICE to cover longer trips and large load carrying) with the Ion originally bought as a "2nd car" but which has basically assumed the role of primary car - around 14k miles a year on the Ion and only 2k miles on the ICE! We try to use the EV as much as possible (and for all commuting) and only fall back to the ICE when necessary.

My daily commute is 35-37 miles depending on the exact route I take, occasionally requires a bit of errand running after work and is what I'd describe as "combined cycle" driving - a mix of 30mph residential and city and 55 mph on the motorway. I actually manage 5-5.4 miles/kWh in summer on this commute but in winter its more like 3.3-3.7 due to the terribly inefficient PTC heater in the Ion.

Unfortunately, we've now outgrown this car, both in terms of range and in physical size, and need something a bit bigger and with a significant bump in range. My son was one when we got the car and didn't take up a lot of room, he'll be 4 in a few months with another step up in child seat size required very soon and it's getting a bit tight... :)

Over the 40k+ miles I've done in the car (which is now knocking on 60k miles) it has experienced significant range loss (about 5 miles in winter 8 miles in summer) with realistic range now about 55 miles in summer and 38 in winter on my commute however to be honest the winter range when I first bought the car was less than I hoped for (vs summer) and was already marginal, arriving home in winter with only about 5 miles left which is not good for either the nerves or the battery... Now it's dropped enough that I have zero margin and the only sensible way to get by in the winter now is a 10 minute splash and dash on the way home at a perfectly positioned Instavolt. However it's a bit of a chore having to do this and it's really starting to grate.

Other things which have worn me down about the car after 3 years besides being a bit small and too short in range for our current needs are -

  • Slow heater warm up (5 minutes to get hot air) and huge range loss from using it, up to 40% at city speeds.
  • No plugged in preheating and you can't run the heater while charging, including rapid charging (partially solved by adding after market heated seat covers which can run while rapid charging)
  • Pretty uncomfortable (for me at 6 foot) driving seat and position with no steering wheel adjustment - big problem as I sometimes have lower back problems. I've tried all kinds of cushions, covers etc, but concluded that the seat is beyond redemption compared to the comfy electrically adjustable leather seats in my ICE.
  • Surprisingly zippy from 15-40mph and catches out a lot of ICE cars in this speed range but agonisingly slow to initially get moving from stationary to 10 mph - sometimes dangerously so at busy roundabouts where it's hard to judge how much to lead the throttle when pulling out resulting in the odd hair raising moment.
  • Poor visibility especially to the rear due to massive headrests but also to the front quarters (I often can't see traffic lights when first in the queue if there is no repeater across the junction without serious contortion)
  • No spare wheel and no room to even fit a space saver - I've had three punctures all of which have required long waits for the AA as I can't do anything to repair it myself and inflation kits always fail me due to the location of the puncture, usually in the sidewall...
  • Odd and different front / rear tyre sizes, limiting tyre choices to only those which are available in both sizes, and making a single spare wheel impossible as the front hubs are keyed to prevent swapping front/rear wheel rims. Impossible to rotate tyres between front and rear to extend their life.
  • Front brakes seem to rust up very easily despite daily use and are nearly impossible to keep in good condition in winter. They always "grind" annoyingly with the sound of rust no matter what I do, and that's after replacing front discs/pads last year...
  • Not a fan of RWD and the way it will kick out the back like you're some idiot driver if you put your foot down a bit too much on a wet roundabout. The traction control does recover the situation but only after you've made a fool of yourself. I'm a longtime FWD driver so I have mixed feelings about driving a RWD car.
Don't get me wrong, I like a lot about the car, it's agile and fun to drive in the city, it's quirky to look at and drive, its a dream to park and manoeuvre in over crowded supermarket car parks due to very tight steering lock and being so narrow (every park is a parent and child! :D) it can fit an amazing amount of stuff with the back seats down etc...and for somebody else this is their ideal runabout car that is fun to drive... but we now need something a bit bigger and better and circumstances have changed to allow that soon.

So I'm looking to get something with at least twice the range especially winter range to replace it, and something with a good bit more room so that the ICE falls mainly to long distance duties instead of long distance and/or large load duties. For comparison my ICE is a 1997 Citroen Xantia V6 - an old but very comfy car which despite being a "saloon styled" hatchback has a very good boot size and gives a lot of room with the rear seats down flat as well.

I've done a bit of thinking and looking around and concluded that in the £10-12k price range that I'm looking at and despite my misgivings about the styling and lack of battery thermal management, a Leaf 30 is probably the only BEV that fits the bill at the moment, and that I'm willing to forgive those two failings if it will be a good reliable, comfortable family/commuting car in nearly all other regards and be a good stepping stone for us, and then in another 4 years I can check the market again to see what else has moved down into the 2nd hand market at affordable prices.

A Leaf 24 is getting a bit old now, is out of battery warranty, and doesn't give the necessary bump in range that I'm looking for, especially after future degradation is taken into consideration.

I've ruled the Zoe out for a few reasons - the main ones are AC only rapid charging (which is going away rapidly, ha ha, with none of the numerous Instavolts in my area supporting AC) lack of split rear seat (almost essential with a child seat and simultaneously squeezing in as much stuff as possible - we use the split rear seat very frequently on both our cars and it's a deal breaker to not have one) as well as the 22kWh Zoe not having enough of a boost in range to make the switch worthwhile, while the 40kWh Zoe is still too new and expensive. I'm also not sold on the build quality of the Zoe (reliability issues) and am not interested in battery lease, which most cheap Zoes seem to be. So it's out.

So I have many Leaf 30 questions, some of which are no doubt answered if I spent hours trawling many threads however I've found a lot of gaps so I'll put them all here.

  • Range ? I get the impression that 100-110 miles is realistic in summer with the heater off for my sort of commute (max speed 55-60mph for half the journey, 30mph for the rest) and maybe 80 miles in winter, would that be fair ? My aim is to double my current range, so 70 miles for winter and 110 miles for summer would double what I have now, with the winter figure being the more important one as the winter is where I struggle. Arriving home with potentially 45 miles left in winter instead of 2-3 miles or charging on the way home would be a complete game changer for me and take a lot of the stress and tedium out of commuting.
  • After living without one for three years I definitely want a Heat pump to minimise range penalty from heater use - from what I understand that means Acenta or Tekna ?
  • How quickly does the heater heat up in freezing conditions until it is blowing warm to hot air into the cabin ?
  • Which spec levels support remote control via phone app ? Acenta and Tekna or only Tekna ?
  • I understand that there might be a one off charge to "reset" the telematics unit from a previous owner before I could connect, however are there any on-going charges or subscription for using app remote control, and if so how much ?
  • There is a pre-heating timer which I believe will run for 45 minutes on power or 15 minutes on battery, correct ? Can this only be programmed through the dashboard or can it also be programmed through the app ?
  • Can the pre-heat timer handle multiple times per day ? For example 6:50am in the morning for leaving home and 4:50pm at night for leaving work ?
  • If the pre-heat timer starts on schedule does that alert me on the phone app and/or give me the opportunity to switch it back off again from the app ? (If I forgot to disable the timer during the holidays for example)
  • How much control is there over the pre-heat configuration - I understand you can set a target cabin temperature, will it automatically switch the vents to the window and will it also bring on the AC if there is a lot of condensation on the inside of the window ? (heat alone is sometimes not enough)
  • I understand you can run the heater in the car while charging both AC and Chademo ? I assume though that with a 3.3kW on board charger you wouldn't actually get much charging done with the heater on though...so one potential advantaged of the 6.6kW charger.
  • Can you set a charge limit for AC and/or DC or does it always charge to 100% ?
  • Does the car have a heater and accessory only parking mode that is safe against accidental driving ? I quite often have to sit and wait for people in the car and like to leave the radio and heater on (if I have the range!) while I wait, sometimes my 3 year old is climbing around in the car while I wait and loves to fiddle with buttons... In my Ion it has a regular gear lever which locks in park unless I press the brake pedal to release it as well as a conventional ratchet handbrake. So the chance of him accidentally bumping the car into drive while I'm sitting in the drivers seat is zero. How would you approach that situation in a Leaf so you can run the heater, interior lights, radio etc such that driving is not possible by accident even if the "gear lever" and other controls someone in the passenger seat can reach are fiddled with ?
  • Is there cruise control, and is it radar adaptive ?
  • Which spec levels get Leather seats - Tekna only ? Which spec levels get electrically adjustable drivers seat including tilt of the base ? I'm someone that typically needs to tilt the front of the seat base up as I have long legs, cars with flat nonadjustable seat bases (like the Ion) are usually uncomfortable for me as they don't support my thighs.
  • How much better is the audio in a Tekna with the "Bose bump" - is it worth the loss of space in the boot or is it just an inconvenience having that bump there for no real gain ? I'm a bit of a HiFi nut in the house (build my own speakers as a hobby etc) yet I've never had a good car audio system so I'd forgive the bump if the improvement in sound quality is big enough over the standard system in the Acenta.
  • Does the car have room to fit a space saver wheel (underneath or inside ?) and does it come with one or is it an optional extra ? I've seen in one video it comes with a tyre pump and jack so that suggests it at least has the option to fit a space saver. After three punctures and long AA waits I would love to have a car with a spare wheel again to take back control in those situations...I'm perfectly capable of changing a wheel.
  • Is the 6.6kW on board charger fairly rare, and what sort of price increase would it usually entail over a similar condition 3.3 ? I have a 7kW tethered Rolec at home which I've only ever been able to use at 3.3kW on my Ion. I do sometimes do multiple long trips on the weekend and quite often charge at home before going out a second time the same day so 6.6kW would in theory benefit me however it's not a show stopper if I found a car that was perfect in other ways but only 3.3kW.
  • I understand the 30 has an 8 year 100k mile drivetrain/battery warranty - does Nissan require frequent regular servicing with them to "maintain" this battery warranty ? If so how can you check if previous owners have kept up the servicing, and what is the servicing schedule (time/miles) and cost ? Does it have a separate shorter "all car" warranty of say 3 years, and does this warranty also require sticking to the servicing schedule to be valid ?
  • A very subjective question this but would you say the Leaf has a comfortable ride ? The Ion has a very firm, somewhat bouncy ride especially at the rear which will actually launch itself in the air if you go a bit fast over a narrow judder bump... :p It's not a comfortable car over bumps in short. On the other hand my Xantia has near magic carpet ride quality with active hydraulic suspension that few other cars can match. I'm assuming that the Leaf will be somewhere in between - more comfortable than the Ion but not as comfy as the Xantia...
  • I believe Accenta and Tekna come with different wheel sizes, does this affect the ride significantly ? I'm not a fan of low profile tyres with large rims and I'm more interested in good ride quality than zooming around corners, at least when driving a Leaf... ;)
  • Wind/road noise at motorway speeds ? Again, there's a lot of wind and road noise at 70mph in the Ion, most of the wind noise coming from the single large wiper blade at the front, whereas there's hardly any wind noise at the same speed on my Xantia despite not having Aero blades fitted...
  • What kind of key/fob does the Leaf have and what features can it activate ? I've seen one video where a button can pop the charge flap, but I don't know what else it can do.
  • Do the rear seats have Isofix and how well do you find child seats fit ? We currently have a Maxi-cosi 1-3 year old seat with a 90 degree swivel (actually without Isofix) but will soon need a slightly bigger seat. Getting a child in and out of the car without too much hassle is a big factor. As the Leaf is lower than the Ion I know it won't be quite as easy to lift him in but there should be more room in front of him.
  • What other spec and feature differences are there between Acenta and Tekna that aren't covered by previous questions ?
Anyway that's all I can think of for now but I'm sure I'll have more questions.

Am I thinking realistically here with my expectations ?
 

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Apologies that I was the owner of a 24, not a 30, but can answer some of your questions...


  • Range ? I get the impression that 100-110 miles is realistic in summer with the heater off for my sort of commute (max speed 55-60mph for half the journey, 30mph for the rest) and maybe 80 miles in winter, would that be fair ? My aim is to double my current range, so 70 miles for winter and 110 miles for summer would double what I have now, with the winter figure being the more important one as the winter is where I struggle. Arriving home with potentially 45 miles left in winter instead of 2-3 miles or charging on the way home would be a complete game changer for me and take a lot of the stress and tedium out of commuting.
My 24, which was at 88% SoH, so about 19kWh usable ranged from 45 (depths of winter, wet, headwind, heater on) to 90 (middle of summer, 56mph hypermiling behind trucks) miles. You should have 24-25kWh usable in a Leaf 30 and so 60 to 120 would be the equivalent under those same circumstances. You, as an experienced EV driver, should easily be able to rely on a bit more in winter than my absolute worst case.

  • After living without one for three years I definitely want a Heat pump to minimise range penalty from heater use - from what I understand that means Acenta or Tekna ?
  • How quickly does the heater heat up in freezing conditions until it is blowing at least warm air into the cabin ?
Yes, but Visia 30s are basically not a thing.

Heater is basically instant - PTC at first until the heat pump gets going.

  • Which spec levels support remote control via phone app ? Acenta and Tekna or only Acenta ?
  • I understand that there might be a one off charge to "reset" the telematics unit from a previous owner before I could connect, however are there any on-going charges or subscription for using app remote control, and if so how much ?
Both have the same telematics support. There's no subscription charge, and I've never heard of a one-off charge to re-assign it either.

  • There is a pre-heating timer which I believe will run for 45 minutes on power or 15 minutes on battery, correct ? Can this only be programmed through the dashboard or can it also be programmed through the app ?
  • Can the pre-heat timer handle multiple times per day ? For example 6:50am in the morning for leaving home and 4:50pm at night for leaving work ?
  • If the pre-heat timer starts on schedule does that alert me on the phone app and/or give me the opportunity to switch it back off again from the app ? (If I forgot to disable the timer during the holidays for example)
  • How much control is there over the pre-heat configuration - I understand you can set a target cabin temperature, will it automatically switch the vents to the window and will it also bring on the AC if there is a lot of condensation on the inside of the window ? (heat alone is sometimes not enough)
Do not rely on the Nissan App to do anything. It is horrendously unreliable.

I can't remember off hand how the timers worked, I only had them set for once per day. Charge timers don't work more than once per day, however.

  • I understand you can run the heater in the car while charging both AC and Chademo ? I assume though that with a 3.3kW on board charger you wouldn't actually get much charging done with the heater on though...so one potential advantaged of the 6.6kW charger.
Yes you can. Once the cabin is up to temp it takes about 300-500W to maintain.

  • Does the car have a heater and accessory only parking mode that is safe against accidental driving ? I quite often have to sit and wait for people in the car and like to leave the radio and heater on (if I have the range!) while I wait, sometimes my 3 year old is climbing around in the car while I wait and loves to fiddle with buttons... In my Ion it has a regular gear lever which locks in park unless I press the brake pedal to release it as well as a conventional ratchet handbrake. So the chance of him accidentally bumping the car into drive while I'm sitting in the drivers seat is zero. How would you approach that situation in a Leaf so you can run the heater, interior lights, radio etc such that driving is not possible by accident ?
Yes. Press the power button twice without foot on brake.

  • Is there cruise control, and is it radar adaptive ?
Yes. No. There is also a speed limiter function

  • Which spec levels get Leather seats - Tekna only ? Which spec levels get electrically adjustable drivers seat including tilt of the base ? I'm someone that typically needs to tilt the front of the seat base up as I have long legs, cars with flat nonadjustable seat bases (like the Ion) are usually uncomfortable for me as they don't support my thighs.
Tekna is the only one that has "Leather". I'm unconvinced. No Leaf 30 has any kind of electric adjustment for the seats.

  • How much better is the audio in a Tekna with the "Bose bump" - is it worth the loss of space in the boot or is it just an inconvenience having that bump there for no real gain ?
Inconvenience. I used to design amplifiers and am a recovering audiophile. The Bose system was really pretty awful - high intermodulation distortion and the sub has massive group delay on it that makes it sound half a beat behind. It also has the typical failing of small subs whereby it overemphasises the mid-high bass and doesn't really add any real extension - there's nothing appreciably below 40Hz with it fitted. I'd have taken it out at some point if we'd kept the car.

  • Does the car have room to fit a space saver wheel (underneath or inside ?) and does it come with one or is it an optional extra ? I've seen in one video it comes with a tyre pump and jack so that suggests it at least has the option to fit a space saver. After three punctures and long AA waits I would love to have a car with a spare wheel again to take back control in those situations...
There's a couple of nice posts somewhere on this forum showing setups that people have done to fit a spare with a new higher boot floor. It comes with a can of goop and an inflator.
  • Is the 6.6kW on board charger fairly rare, and what sort of price increase would it usually entail over a similar condition 3.3 ? I have a 7kW tethered Rolec at home which I've only ever been able to use at 3.3kW on my Ion. I do sometimes do multiple long trips on the weekend and quite often charge at home before going out a second time so 6.6 would in theory benefit me however it's not a show stopper if I found a car that was perfect in other ways but only 3.3.
I've been watching Leaf 30s for a colleague, and it doesn't seem to carry much extra value in the used market because it seems that few used dealers or punters understand the difference. It's fairly rare because it had a disproportionate impact on new lease rates so few people took it up.

  • A very subjective question this but would you say the Leaf has a comfortable ride ? The Ion has a very firm, somewhat bouncy ride especially at the rear which will actually launch itself in the air if you go a bit fast over a narrow judder bump... :p It's not a comfortable car over bumps in short. On the other hand my Xantia has near magic carpet ride quality with active hydraulic suspension that few other cars can match. I'm assuming that the Leaf will be somewhere in between - more comfortable than the Ion but not as comfy as the Xantia...
The leaf has a very soft ride. Softer in ways than our Lexus GS, definitely softer than the Model 3. It's comfortable but not sea-sick inducing. If you enjoy the Xantia it's closer to that end of the spectrum. Handling is surprisingly good, thanks to the Low CoG and centralised mass, it doesn't roll as much as you expect for the softness.
  • I believe Accent and Tekna come with different wheel sizes, does this affect the ride significantly ? I'm more interested in good ride quality than zooming around corners, at least when driving a Leaf... ;)
The Tekna remains pretty comfortable. To me, however, the bigger deal is that the Tekna tyres are literally twice the price of the Acenta tyres for a comparable brand/type (eg Crossclimates for our Tekna were £460. Primacy 4 for my friend's Acenta were £230). 2p/mile for Tekna tyres, 1p/mile for Acenta (assume 23k from a set)

  • Wind/road noise at motorway speeds ? Again, there's a lot of wind and road noise at 70mph in the Ion, most of the wind noise coming from the single large wiper blade at the front, whereas there's hardly any wind noise at the same speed on my Xantia despite not having Aero blades fitted...
Very acceptable. The wind noise is well controlled with the funky lights pushing air away from the door mirrors so there's very little mirror flutter (but you do notice if you get a crosswind that spoils this you get flutter from one side only!). Especially with the Crossclimates on it was a pleasingly quiet place. I took a mate out in the Model 3 and his immediate comment was that he thought it was noisier than my Leaf was.
  • What kind of key/fob does the Leaf have and what features can it activate ? I've seen one video where a button can pop the charge flap, but I don't know what else it can do.
3 button fob. Lock, unlock, open charge flap. All Acenta/Tekna have keyless, so you don't need to use the fob to open the doors or boot - press the lock/unlock button on the handle and if you have the key on you it will work (usually, not always reliable, very sensitive to keyfob battery, even if it says it's ok).

  • Do the rear seats have Isofix and how well do you find child seats fit ? We currently have a Maxi-cosi 1-3 year old seat with a 90 degree swivel (actually without Isofix) but will soon need a slightly bigger seat. Getting a child in and out of the car without too much hassle is a big factor. As the Leaf is lower than the Ion I know it won't be quite as easy to lift him in but there should be more room in front of him.
Yes it has ISOfix. My brother has a 24 Tekna and a 2 year old (and shortly a second one). I've not heard complaints from them about it.

Am I thinking realistically here with my expectations ?
I'd expect nothing less from someone as thorough as you. :). But yes, you are. A couple of items not touched on:

Acenta have Halogen H4 headlamps that have a reputation for being pretty poor. Tekna have LED headlamps that are quite decent (a match for the Xenons I had in my Volvo V70 - not as good as the Model 3 or Lexus GS450h LEDs), but main-beam is halogen and basically useless.

Tekna has heated seats - only a few Acentas with a specific (very rare) option pack did.

However, as an Ex-Leafer, if it was my money I'd buy a Kia Soul EV instead of a Leaf 30. No App, but at least then you don't have the expectation vs one that is routinely unreliable. The Soul has a more efficient drivetrain (but poor aero so loses efficiency quickly at speed - my calculations/estimation have it meet the Leaf at about 65mph), better build, better infotainment, thermally managed battery, all Souls have 6.6kW AC. Also the whole-car warranty is 7 years/100k, so a 16 plate Soul still has over 3 years warranty on it. All have heated seats, etc - basically the only option was colour, very high spec car otherwise. Had a petrol Soul as a rental in the USA, and it was a very endearing and honest car, but suffered the same highway-speed efficiency hit (32mpgUS in town, 32mpgUS highway was our experience). Then again, my brother would rather gouge his own eyes out than have a Soul, so there's that...
 

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Couple of further musings, re-reading a couple of points you mentioned.

A-Pillar visibility: The Leaf is AWFUL for this. The little quarter windows are pretty pointless and the angle/size of the pillars was terrible for me. I've never owned any other car as bad for this, but you could literally lose a transit van in that blindspot. T-junctions need a good work-out to move around to look around the A-pillars, and the Leaf is a prime candidate for Constant Bearing Decreasing Range accidents.

Steering wheel position - No reach adjust. I'm 5ft7 and always felt that the steering wheel was too far away from me with everything else set up right.

Zippy: The Leaf is a nippy car, and with decent tyres on has quite strong front-end grip. However, its traction control is not at all clever - it can allow too much slip under acceleration at junctions, and yet a slip over a bump (I used to have this routinely going over a gutter at the bottom of our drive, 180degree turn in from the road), then it does the ICE thing of cutting power for a specified time-out of 1 second. The Tesla is notably far better at traction control that's goal is providing traction, rather than preventing wheelspin by preventing drive. Conversely, the stability control does have one good trick for climbing a slippery/snowy slope, whereby if you turn off the traction control, the stability control provides a limited-slip behaviour, braking the spinning wheel to push torque back across the open diff to the gripping wheel. In other words, you can climb a snowy slope with one spinning wheel and one gripping wheel.

Brake seizing: I had a seized brake - actually the inside OSF pad was seized into the carrier. The pins and piston were freely moving, but the inside pad was totally unable to move (and difficult to see that that was thecase). Removed the pad, cleaned up the rust off the pad ears, removed the stainless inserts from the carriers, cleaned underneath them, put all back together and it was fine.

Braking performance of the Leaf isn't very good - definitely the worst of any car I've had since 2008. Not only was max deceleration not as strong as others, but it's also the most inconsistent I've ever had for brake feel - blame the combined regen/braking system. To some extent our Lexus hybrid suffers from a similar inconsistency, but if you stamp it then that car STOPS (aided by 4-piston monoblock calipers and mad 365mm floating-rotor discs). Sometimes it really felt like the Leaf decided that today wasn't a day for stopping, even with the pedal hard down. It's possible that this was affected by the seized pad, but no sideways pull was evident and it passed MOT. Over the 19 months and 12200 miles I drove the Leaf I never would describe the brakes as "confidence inspiring".
 

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I agree with the above apart from the conclusion about the Soul - it is a considerably more expensive car (at today's prices) and suffers from lift-off oversteer in extremis (particularly loaded) more than the LEAF which if you have been caught out by I'd watch out for.
You can fit the space-saver either in the boot or under the boot floor but to get to the it in the latter case means making the rear diffuser removable (or deleting it as on the early Australian cars that were so fitted) which means that you'll get very dirty accessing it as sods law dictates it will be dark/wet/muddy when you get a puncture.
I took would recommend getting the Tekna for the heated seats / wheel and the LEDs - the dipped beam is good enough for country lanes up to 60 and as mentioned the main beam is no better - and then change to 16" wheels (lots available from Juke's etc.) for cheaper tyres, lower energy consumption (probably not much more than 0.2 miles/kWh but it all helps) and a better ride.
Just a pedantic note on the chargers - they are 3.6 and 6.6 kW which put 3.0 and 6.0 kW DC into the battery according to Nissan, and as above it was about an £1,100 option so only a few dealer demonstrators have them.
As above both the charge and climate timers only work once a day. The heater will pull 4 kW briefly but settles down quickly to under 1 kW so you can keep charging whilst running it, particularly at rapids. Whilst there is no Rapidgate issue the charging rate falls off quickly so don't plan on going much past 80% or you'll have other EV owners banging on your windows and writing rude messages on your car. :rolleyes:
We have two "identical" LEAFs and one brakes well - the other doesn't - yet I've physically checked brakes / suspension etc and suspect the electronic servo but can't prove it. I can only suggest some aggressive treatment on your test drive - try something just short of a full ABS emergency stop from 60 - 20 if the traffic is clear and you'll either know what we mean or have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Apologies that I was the owner of a 24, not a 30, but can answer some of your questions...
Sorry, I didn't mean to exclude anyone - I'm just not sure how much overlap there is in specs and features between the Gen 2 24kWh and the 30kWh. You have some great answers.
My 24, which was at 88% SoH, so about 19kWh usable ranged from 45 (depths of winter, wet, headwind, heater on) to 90 (middle of summer, 56mph hypermiling behind trucks) miles. You should have 24-25kWh usable in a Leaf 30 and so 60 to 120 would be the equivalent under those same circumstances. You, as an experienced EV driver, should easily be able to rely on a bit more in winter than my absolute worst case.
I can do a lot worse than 35 miles in winter on my Ion if I try.... :D My 35 mile winter figure is based on fairly conservative driving for range - sticking to 55mph in the slow lane when on the motorway etc...so I can see how an absolute worst case winter figure could get as low as 60 on the 30kWh with 80 being more typical of careful driving. Either way it's roughly double what I have available now for a comparable driving style.
Yes, but Visia 30s are basically not a thing.
I'd already ruled the Visia out due to lack of heat pump but that's good to know.
Do not rely on the Nissan App to do anything. It is horrendously unreliable.
So I've heard... hence trying to find out if it's possible to set two pre-heat timers per day to handle the after work scenario as well. This winter has been extremely mild so far but in a bad winter my windscreen is totally iced up when leaving work as well as in the morning as the car spends the day parked on the road. So while it sounds like the heater comes on very quickly and would de-ice quite rapidly, being able to do it remotely or by 2nd timer would still be good.

I think I read somewhere that someone had written a 3rd party app to replace the Nissan one that is more reliable, or did I imagine that ?
Tekna is the only one that has "Leather". I'm unconvinced. No Leaf 30 has any kind of electric adjustment for the seats.
Oh that's a real shame. The last three cars prior to the Ion including my current ICE have all had electric adjustment for the seats and you kind of get used to that degree of adjustability. Can you at least tilt the seat base back or are you limited only to up down and backrest angle ? I don't mind a good cloth seat if it's comfortable, although that was before I had a 3 year old agent of destruction...
Inconvenience. I used to design amplifiers and am a recovering audiophile. The Bose system was really pretty awful - high intermodulation distortion and the sub has massive group delay on it that makes it sound half a beat behind. It also has the typical failing of small subs whereby it overemphasises the mid-high bass and doesn't really add any real extension - there's nothing appreciably below 40Hz with it fitted. I'd have taken it out at some point if we'd kept the car.
That's disappointing. I'm not a fan of excessive upper bass either, I find it quite tiring. On the other hand what I'm listening to now with two factory front door speakers is probably a lot worse. I guess I'll save my quality listening time for the living room. :)
The leaf has a very soft ride. Softer in ways than our Lexus GS, definitely softer than the Model 3. It's comfortable but not sea-sick inducing. If you enjoy the Xantia it's closer to that end of the spectrum. Handling is surprisingly good, thanks to the Low CoG and centralised mass, it doesn't roll as much as you expect for the softness.
Hard ride and hard seats is really beginning to wear on the Ion, it sounds like the Leaf would be big improvement there. I love the ride and handling of the Xantia (It's a V6 Hydractive 2) there's not much like it for ride which is why I cling to it as my fun car despite it being 23 and something of a gas guzzler. If it's any consolation I do 90% of my miles in an EV though and that would increase further if I did have a Leaf with more range than I have now.
The Tekna remains pretty comfortable. To me, however, the bigger deal is that the Tekna tyres are literally twice the price of the Acenta tyres for a comparable brand/type (eg Crossclimates for our Tekna were £460. Primacy 4 for my friend's Acenta were £230). 2p/mile for Tekna tyres, 1p/mile for Acenta (assume 23k from a set)
Expensive lower profile tyres and a big Bose hump certainly put me off the Tekna a little bit and make me lean more towards the Acenta.
Acenta have Halogen H4 headlamps that have a reputation for being pretty poor. Tekna have LED headlamps that are quite decent (a match for the Xenons I had in my Volvo V70 - not as good as the Model 3 or Lexus GS450h LEDs), but main-beam is halogen and basically useless.
The headlights in my Xantia are pretty useless - even after fitting higher output bulbs, so I'm pretty used to that... the headlights in the Ion are significantly better.
Tekna has heated seats - only a few Acentas with a specific (very rare) option pack did.
Hmm, I've added heated seat covers on the Ion and find they make a huge difference to comfort and how much you need to use the heater. I had kind of assumed the Acenta would have them but apparently not! Not a show stopper but a strike against the (standard option) Acenta.
However, as an Ex-Leafer, if it was my money I'd buy a Kia Soul EV instead of a Leaf 30. No App, but at least then you don't have the expectation vs one that is routinely unreliable. The Soul has a more efficient drivetrain (but poor aero so loses efficiency quickly at speed - my calculations/estimation have it meet the Leaf at about 65mph), better build, better infotainment, thermally managed battery, all Souls have 6.6kW AC. Also the whole-car warranty is 7 years/100k, so a 16 plate Soul still has over 3 years warranty on it. All have heated seats, etc - basically the only option was colour, very high spec car otherwise. Had a petrol Soul as a rental in the USA, and it was a very endearing and honest car, but suffered the same highway-speed efficiency hit (32mpgUS in town, 32mpgUS highway was our experience). Then again, my brother would rather gouge his own eyes out than have a Soul, so there's that...
No matter how good it is technically the old Kia Soul EV does not pass the WAF test, (I won't repeat what she said when I've shown her a picture of one) and while I find the Leaf 30 a bit of an "ugly duckling" I find the original Soul hideous looking, and just can't get past the looks.

To me the Leaf is only a stepping stone while I bide my time for better longer range EV's to shuffle their way down the second hand market. The end goal in maybe 4-5 years from now would be something like the Kia e-Niro which I'm quite taken with as a family car.... but way, way too expensive for me new.
 

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Having had a Soul I would say the Leaf is a better all rounder. The Soul EV has NO connected functions so you can't pre heat from an app and it won't pre heat when not plugged in. Handling wise the Soul was typical tall uninspiring car. It also was scary when braking on uneven surfaces. It would just stop doing regen but not apply friction braking for around half a second or more then decide it could then be arsed to do it. It was well built and well equipped. Interior quality was good. I think the Soul is less fugly than the Leaf 30. But both are double baggers.

Leaf does let you use full heat and radio in the double power button press mode that it has. Zoe was useless. You could turn the fans on for 10 minutes at a time with no heat. Or turn the radio on for 10 minutes. It automatically cuts off.

I've only driven 2 Leaf 40s. If the ride is the same in the 30 then it's basically comfortable and competent. The Soul was more pogo stick and so was the Zoe. Zoe also had a rear end wiggle over bumps too. It was fun but could get a bit tiresome.
 

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Well, that's settled re the Soul then!

I'd say the "optimum" spec of a Leaf 30 is a Tekna with 16" fitted and the sub removed.

The driver's seat has fore-aft, base height and back recline functions. I recall the base angle tends to change with height (the rear of the base comes up more than the front as you heighten it).

My experience with the app was that for the last 7 months of owning the car I was never once able to get charge status from the car, but I could send "climate on" command. I had the morning covered by the timer (and there's a setting somewhere in it that you can set the timer to work only on external power or both - but the option name doesn't make obvious what it is), and then used the app in the evening. What I have heard is that if lots of people are trying to use the app at once (eg switch on climate remotely on a cold morning) the nissan servers can't cope and it just doesn't work (EVMan on youtube has spoken to this).

The climate command from the app is a simple on/off. There's a setting somewhere in the car to set what the preheat temp is (distinct from the current cabin temp), and it will switch on the heated wheel for you too. If you leave the seat heater switch set on then it will do that too, but if you don't, it won't turn it on for you. Generally I found the heated wheel to be good as a pre-warm function and to take the chill off the wheel, but in actual driving it got too hot for comfort (made my hands sweat) and then cut off for 10 minutes (even cycling the power switch didn't bring it back).

Re the brakes - there's actually been a lot of noise out of new zealand regarding the braking issue, and there are firmware updates available for the brake module that are meant to improve the "will I, won't I" effect. However, when I enquired with Nissan they denied there was any problem, told me it was probably because I'd charged it up and had no regen (not true, and when I drive the same commute daily, I know when it suddenly decides to behave differently!) and refused to countenance the idea of providing a software update.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
A-Pillar visibility: The Leaf is AWFUL for this. The little quarter windows are pretty pointless and the angle/size of the pillars was terrible for me. I've never owned any other car as bad for this, but you could literally lose a transit van in that blindspot. T-junctions need a good work-out to move around to look around the A-pillars, and the Leaf is a prime candidate for Constant Bearing Decreasing Range accidents.
Sounds the same as the Ion then. Ridiculously thick A pillars with the silly little windows (due to the A-pillar brace) that are very hard to look past. When I come to a junction and look left the left hand A-pillar is at the right angle to perfectly obscure the entire road to the left. I literally can't see if anyone's coming from the left without leaning forward or backward to see past the A-pillar. :rolleyes:

Also driving on a slight right hand curve means the right A-pillar totally blocks my view of the cars in front of me unless I lean to the left. I had sort of assumed a lot of modern cars were the same due to the way A-pillars are designed for safety now with a much shallower angle and a brace. Older cars like my Xantia have infinitely better A pillar visibility due to the pillars being skinnier and being at a steeper angle, the disadvantage of course is the A-pillars would fold up in a collision as they aren't very strong...

On top of the A-pillar visibility issue though the high seating position in the Ion means that your upwards visibility towards nearby traffic lights is severely limited, also it has the largest front headrests that I've ever seen on a car, combined with the rear headrests the rear visibility is terrible. I suspect the Leaf is not quite as bad on these two points.
Steering wheel position - No reach adjust. I'm 5ft7 and always felt that the steering wheel was too far away from me with everything else set up right.
Every car I've ever driven without reach adjustment feels like the steering wheel is a bit far away when the seat is adjusted for my legs to reach the pedals correctly. The Ion has no reach or rake adjustment at all on the steering wheel, the Xantia has a small amount of rake adjustment (not much really) and no reach adjustment either.
Zippy: The Leaf is a nippy car, and with decent tyres on has quite strong front-end grip. However, its traction control is not at all clever - it can allow too much slip under acceleration at junctions, and yet a slip over a bump (I used to have this routinely going over a gutter at the bottom of our drive, 180degree turn in from the road), then it does the ICE thing of cutting power for a specified time-out of 1 second.
Yes the Ion does something similar - if you drive over a slippery patch like a smooth metal grating, any significant wheel slip and it cuts the torque in half for about 2 seconds before it brings it back again.
The Tesla is notably far better at traction control that's goal is providing traction, rather than preventing wheelspin by preventing drive. Conversely, the stability control does have one good trick for climbing a slippery/snowy slope, whereby if you turn off the traction control, the stability control provides a limited-slip behaviour, braking the spinning wheel to push torque back across the open diff to the gripping wheel. In other words, you can climb a snowy slope with one spinning wheel and one gripping wheel.
Are you referring to the Leaf or Tesla in your latter point ? On the Ion if you leave stability/traction control on (there is only one button for both) it will do differential braking of the real wheels (RWD car) if there is wheel slip at slow driving speeds. So you can get moving up an icy road as it will apply the brake to only the side where the wheel is spinning and reduce but not eliminate the power on the other wheel.

I've managed to get moving on some pretty hairy icy stretches thanks to that system, although I do have all season tyres as well. If I disable ASC/traction control however then pressing the throttle in the same conditions will just spin the wheels like crazy. The main time you would use that is if you're in deep snow - in that situation the traction control limits the power/speed so much you can't get moving while disabling it allows you to get moving in deep snow.
Brake seizing: I had a seized brake - actually the inside OSF pad was seized into the carrier. The pins and piston were freely moving, but the inside pad was totally unable to move (and difficult to see that that was thecase). Removed the pad, cleaned up the rust off the pad ears, removed the stainless inserts from the carriers, cleaned underneath them, put all back together and it was fine.
Mechanical brake maintenance I can sort myself, I always DIY that stuff...
Braking performance of the Leaf isn't very good - definitely the worst of any car I've had since 2008. Not only was max deceleration not as strong as others, but it's also the most inconsistent I've ever had for brake feel - blame the combined regen/braking system. To some extent our Lexus hybrid suffers from a similar inconsistency, but if you stamp it then that car STOPS (aided by 4-piston monoblock calipers and mad 365mm floating-rotor discs). Sometimes it really felt like the Leaf decided that today wasn't a day for stopping, even with the pedal hard down. It's possible that this was affected by the seized pad, but no sideways pull was evident and it passed MOT. Over the 19 months and 12200 miles I drove the Leaf I never would describe the brakes as "confidence inspiring".
I've read about the inconsistent brake feel in the Leaf. To be honest the brakes in the Ion are pretty rubbish though.

I've replaced the front discs and pads due to corrosion and warping and overhauled the rear drums and they're still only what I'd call serviceable but not inspiring. The front calipers have a rubber bush on one of the slide pins that ends up swelling and jamming the pin - fitted new pins and bushes and used the correct supplied grease and it did it again in 6 months! Replaced the pin with the rubber bush step for the metal only version (normally only used on the top pin) and no more problems with jamming in 2 years however the discs rust terribly so the pads are always grinding on a lip of rust which makes them less sensitive than they should be unless you go out of your way to give them a regular no-regen workout.

The rear drums get really grabby when wet. A couple of winters ago it got so bad that the slightest touch of the brake pedal was locking up the rear left wheel and causing a skid on snow/ice, and twice the rear left wheel locked completely after I stopped due to a binding shoe and I couldn't get moving forwards until I reversed first to unlock it. With another car behind me at the traffic lights! After I overhauled the rear drums it is much better but still a little bit grabby when wet. I've never been a fan of drums. Front discs and pads are available in the after market but the rear drums and shoes are not!

The brakes aren't a patch on those in the Xantia which can really haul arse when you stamp on them.
 

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I had sort of assumed a lot of modern cars were the same due to the way A-pillars are designed for safety now with a much shallower angle and a brace. Older cars like my Xantia have infinitely better A pillar visibility due to the pillars being skinnier and being at a steeper angle, the disadvantage of course is the A-pillars would fold up in a collision as they aren't very strong...
I too thought all modern cars were rubbish for this, and had also read that curtain airbags meant the pillars needed way more space. I believed those things until I first drove a 4th gen (2012-2019) Lexus GS. The GS has so much attention applied to the design of the A-pillar that it's almost magically thin compared to other modern cars. No, not as thin as cars from 40 year or more back, but at least the GS has roof strength. Way better visibility than my late 90s galants, 2003 Accord, 2011 V70.


Are you referring to the Leaf or Tesla in your latter point ? On the Ion if you leave stability/traction control on (there is only one button for both) it will do differential braking of the real wheels (RWD car) if there is wheel slip at slow driving speeds. So you can get moving up an icy road as it will apply the brake to only the side where the wheel is spinning and reduce but not eliminate the power on the other wheel.
Sorry, wasn't clear - the Leaf. If you turn traction off it will allow the slip, but the stability control is always there, and provides the limited slip behaviour (as I understand it - certainly there's no mechanical LSD and that's the behaviour I was getting). I've not yet had the Tesla in snow, and not something I'm looking forward to (hmmm... 250kW RWD car on Pilot Sport 4 in the snow... what could possibly go wrong? My alternative, of course, is to take the Lexus.... a 250kW RWD car on P Zeros. doh!)

I've managed to get moving on some pretty hairy icy stretches thanks to that system, although I do have all season tyres as well.
I know I don't need to tell you that that's the important bit.

Mechanical brake maintenance I can sort myself, I always DIY that stuff...

I've replaced the front discs and pads due to corrosion and warping and overhauled the rear drums and they're still only what I'd call serviceable but not inspiring. The front calipers have a rubber bush on one of the slide pins that ends up swelling and jamming the pin - fitted new pins and bushes and used the correct supplied grease and it did it again in 6 months! Replaced the pin with the rubber bush step for the metal only version (normally only used on the top pin) and no more problems with jamming in 2 years however the discs rust terribly so the pads are always grinding on a lip of rust.
I think that's de rigeur for all Mitsubishis? Certainly my galants were awful for brakes... My 1998R Galant taught me all about stripping down brakes, greasing pins, replacing discs and pads, etc. My 2001 Galant never actually got to that stage (it had the bigger front discs... the piddly 256mm jobs on the 98 were not up to the job) because it had so much else wrong with it (For some reason I ignored the received wisdom about avoiding the GDI engines like the plague, and bought a GDI...). Sadly, after a long family history with Mitsubishis, that car ended it (and more the shame because the 98 was a great car).
 

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Does the car have room to fit a space saver wheel (underneath or inside ?) and does it come with one or is it an optional extra ? I've seen in one video it comes with a tyre pump and jack so that suggests it at least has the option to fit a space saver. After three punctures and long AA waits I would love to have a car with a spare wheel again to take back control in those situations...I'm perfectly capable of changing a wheel
It probably has plenty of room to fit a so-called 'space saver' wheel either in the boot or slung underneath. I say probably as my only experience is with the slightly bigger Leaf 40kWh.

However, whether or not you can fit a toy wheel isn't the real problem ! If you have to use it, you'll need to put the 'real' wheel somewhere so a space that only just accommodates the toy version probably won't take the damaged one - a point conveniently overlooked by people who'd flog you a 'space saver' ! Note also that when using one of those things, you'd be restricted to 50mph and urged not to go further than 50 miles (but it's so unpleasant using one that you probably wouldn't want to exceed 15 mph or 10 miles).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I know I don't need to tell you that that's the important bit.
I've had Vredestein Quatrac 5 on the Ion since its first winter - they're one of the few decent all season tyres (3PMSF rated) that are available in both the tyre sizes the car needs, we've had no snow or ice this winter (yet) but last winter I was driving circles around other cars that were stuck on their presumably summer tyres on relatively modest inclines.

I live up a bit of a hill and many times have driven up that hill, un-gritted with fresh snow fall, turned into my street and into my driveway without so much as the slightest bit of wheel spin - driving carefully but not unnecessarily slowly, only to see other cars stuck, or spinning their wheels sliding backwards on the same stretch of road moments later. I've even had it through fresh deep snow that was deeper than the ground clearance of the car without getting stuck. Tyres really make all the difference.
I think that's de rigeur for all Mitsubishis? Certainly my galants were awful for brakes... My 1998R Galant taught me all about stripping down brakes, greasing pins, replacing discs and pads, etc. My 2001 Galant never actually got to that stage (it had the bigger front discs... the piddly 256mm jobs on the 98 were not up to the job) because it had so much else wrong with it (For some reason I ignored the received wisdom about avoiding the GDI engines like the plague, and bought a GDI...). Sadly, after a long family history with Mitsubishis, that car ended it (and more the shame because the 98 was a great car).
This is the first "Mitsubishi" (in PSA clothing) I've ever owned and I can't say it's a brand I would normally buy, certainly if it hadn't been an EV. While the EV side of the car is designed very well, (batteries, motor, etc) the car part of the car is pretty basic and cheap and that applies to the brakes, suspension, interior, body panels etc...
 

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  • Range ? I get the impression that 100-110 miles is realistic in summer with the heater off for my sort of commute (max speed 55-60mph for half the journey, 30mph for the rest) and maybe 80 miles in winter, would that be fair ? My aim is to double my current range, so 70 miles for winter and 110 miles for summer would double what I have now, with the winter figure being the more important one as the winter is where I struggle. Arriving home with potentially 45 miles left in winter instead of 2-3 miles or charging on the way home would be a complete game changer for me and take a lot of the stress and tedium out of commuting.
  • After living without one for three years I definitely want a Heat pump to minimise range penalty from heater use - from what I understand that means Acenta or Tekna ?
  • How quickly does the heater heat up in freezing conditions until it is blowing warm to hot air into the cabin ?
  • Which spec levels support remote control via phone app ? Acenta and Tekna or only Tekna ?
  • I understand that there might be a one off charge to "reset" the telematics unit from a previous owner before I could connect, however are there any on-going charges or subscription for using app remote control, and if so how much?
From my 3 months experience with a Leaf it will meet your Winter range needs. Not had one in the Summer so not sure about that.

I believe the Acenta is the lowest spec for the 30kWh and all have heat pumps.

The heater will blow hot air within a couple of minutes - much quicker than an ICE car.

All of them support remote control via the app. I have found My Leaf to be more convenient than the Nissan app, but it's slow to log in. It's meant to give statistics on driving performance but this hasn't worked since the start of December. It still works for checking battery status and starting the climate control. The app will notify you when the car stops charging - this seems to be reliable and was very useful when a rapid charge stopped whilst we were drinking coffee in a services.

There is no charge if the car is registered with a previous owner on the Nissan app. You just need to contact Nissan via their web site - they probably needed to see evidence you own the car - and they will do it for you. We had to take the car to a dealer for a TCU reset but there was no charge for this either. There is no onging subscription charge either and it wouldn't be worth paying for.

You can only set one time for each day for pre-heating. This is the departure time, not the time the pre-heating starts. I'm not sure how long it runs for. I don't think this can be changed from the app. You can set a climate control schedule from the app but I've not used it so don't know if it works.

You can't set a charge limit from the car. If you want to charge to less than 100% you have to set the timer and work out how long you need to charge for.

The car has a simple cruise control and a speed limiter, not sure if this is the same on the Tekna.

The Leaf has a foot operated "handbrake" and there would be no chance of this being accidentally released. There is also an accessory mode which you get if you press the start button once without pressing the brake pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
It probably has plenty of room to fit a so-called 'space saver' wheel either in the boot or slung underneath. I say probably as my only experience is with the slightly bigger Leaf 40kWh.

However, whether or not you can fit a toy wheel isn't the real problem ! If you have to use it, you'll need to put the 'real' wheel somewhere so a space that only just accommodates the toy version probably won't take the damaged one - a point conveniently overlooked by people who'd flog you a 'space saver' ! Note also that when using one of those things, you'd be restricted to 50mph and urged not to go further than 50 miles (but it's so unpleasant using one that you probably wouldn't want to exceed 15 mph or 10 miles).
Good point on needing room to put the punctured wheel, however the majority of the time the car would not be packed so tightly that I couldn't squeeze the punctured wheel into the normal cargo space in the boot or even at a stretch on the back seat in a plastic bag!

Despite that and speed limitations it's preferable to waiting for the AA. To give you an idea of the drama I've been through with punctures it goes something like this: (which has happened to me twice now, plus a third puncture under different circumstances)

Leave work and discover a flat tyre either before I get in the car or get a puncture soon after leaving work and pull over somewhere in the middle of Glasgow. I have both my partner and Son to pick up on the way home from two different locations.

Try to use the tyre inflation kit - it fails because the sidewall is damaged. (Wouldn't be safe to drive on it anyway) Call the AA then my partner to tell her to find her own way home by bus and walking. Wait 2+ hours for the AA to attend. (yes, over 2 hours both times) They try to repair the puncture and can't either. They offer to drive my car to the nearest tyre shop but of course none are open by this time as its after 7pm at night, and I don't want to leave my car in an unlocked car park and then have to find my way home some other way and find my way to the random tyre shop the next day when I'm supposed to be going to work.

AA offers to loan me their universal spare and follow me the 15 miles home... So they put it on and follow me home. When I get there I have to put the ICE out on the street, park the Ion, put it on stands and give back their spare wheel. Then I have to go back out in the ICE to pick up my Son and bring him home, about 3 hours late, and I finally get home to settle in for the night at about 9pm.

Now I can't drive the EV and have to take the wheel using my ICE to my normal local tyre shop. As it's an uncommon size at least for the Quatrac 5 they always have to back order it, which means I'm waiting several days for a tyre then can't get the wheel into them until the following weekend after the tyre arrives as I have no way to get there during their open hours during the week. Meanwhile I have to drive the gas guzzling petrol car which costs about half as much as the replacement tyre.

Then I drive to the tyre shop in the ICE with the wheel in the back, get them to fix it, take it back home then put it back on the car myself. Only after I have got home can I take the car for a test drive to double check the tyre balance is correct. (Yes I seem to have a lot of problems with getting tyres shops to balance wheels correctly)

A complete PITA. Now imagine the space saver scenario:

I notice a puncture, I spend maybe 10-15 minutes changing the wheel and stuff the original tyre in the boot somewhere. I then drive home normally delayed by perhaps half an hour, picking up partner and son, the following day I phone to order a tyre, then carefully drive to work for those few days on the space saver (I don't do more than 55mph normally anyway so 50 is not a hassle) until I can get the car into them, and they take the space saver off and fix the tyre.

Wow, that was easy. That's what it used to be like back in the days when cars routinely came with spare wheels! :LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
All of them support remote control via the app. I have found My Leaf to be more convenient than the Nissan app, but it's slow to log in. It's meant to give statistics on driving performance but this hasn't worked since the start of December. It still works for checking battery status and starting the climate control. The app will notify you when the car stops charging - this seems to be reliable and was very useful when a rapid charge stopped whilst we were drinking coffee in a services.
Thank you.

It was the My Leaf app that I was thinking of when I thought I'd read about a 3rd party app. Of course if the reason for problems with the Nissan app is overloading at the servers and this app still has to go through the same servers it could potentially still have issues at peak times, but if the issue is the app itself it may work more reliably. Do you have any problems with the app starting climate control at peak times on a weekday morning ?

I like the suggestion earlier though - use the timer for the morning and the app for after work, as a workaround.
You can't set a charge limit from the car. If you want to charge to less than 100% you have to set the timer and work out how long you need to charge for.
So even on Chademo it will try to charge all the way to 100% ?
 

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DB- i-s has pretty much nailed it. Just a couple of points. I have a 2016 Tekna and for some peculiar reason known only to Nissan, they have LED low beams and halogen mains and filaments everywhere else.
The halogen mains are dreadful, worse than my classic ford popular I used to have, that gives you some idea how awful they are. I think the newer ones have full LED's but your price range precludes that.

The Nissan app is pretty dire, but there are a plethora of other apps you can use, myleaf is my favourite. If you are an Apple fanboy, then of course you will have to pay for them. The third-party apps still have to utilise the dreadfully slow Nissan API calls, and every update breaks everything. In your price range, you will be looking at a used one, make sure you get a Tekna as that has all the toys. Like I-S said, the Bose sound system is a waste of boot space. Like him, I was a professional PA systems (and video) technician, and the very first day I ripped it out and stuck it on a shelf in the garage.

My leaf is one of the most comfy cars I have ever had, and I have had lots. The only car that came close is my Ford Fairlaine limousine I had in Western Australia. My Peugeot 3008 wasn't too bad, but had a lumbar support bar that damaged my back when I was rear-ended. My Juke was just OK. The VW EOS was too low down but was ok once in the seat. I too am six foot, but with very long legs, as you age you get shorter, but it is the spine which compresses, your legs remain the same uncomfortable length. To give you some idea, with my injury I can cope with almost an hour driving the Leaf, but in my wife's little Fiat Panda, I am in serious pain after 20 mins. I do bemoan the lack of much steering wheel movement, and I too find traffic lights hard to see with the Leaf's big pillars at the front, contortions were the go until I mounted a small adjustable mirror on the dash to assist vision.

Cruise control is not radar adaptive, but the all-round vision is just amazing. As I remarked on another post here, with my brand-new Juke my wife had somehow managed to damage three alloy wheels within a few weeks, with this car and it's camera birds-eye view, they are in showroom condition 8 months later-just brilliant!

Child seats have the standard isofix, but they grow so fast my little 7-year-old granddaughter has been on a booster seat for 3 years and they are very easily managed (she is tall for her age though). The DAB radio is better than the VW EOS and does not blank anywhere near as often. That depends on your location to a great extent, if you live in a city you should have no trouble with reception on the Leaf HU except between tall buildings. In the country nobody gets good reception, although the New Forest near me has decent coverage, Devon and Cornwall are pretty dire just like mobile 'phone reception. It still has FM and AM bands though for that.

On the two long journeys I have done in my Leaf, I went from here in Poole to Blackpool (295 miles) in June, and stopped for two charges. The first leg was cross-country over the Cranborne Chase to Bristol,
105 miles, I charged at Wessex Nissan Gloucester, and that was on a wing and a prayer, dire warnings about battery level low and flashing dash lights. The second leg was less harrowing, Stafford Nissan 80miles, then charged with a granny charger at my destination with about 25 miles remaining on the guess-o-meter.
It can comfortably transport 4 adults with ample legroom in the back for those passengers.

There are a couple of annoyances, I mentioned the steering wheel adjustment (lack of) and the door pillars, the other is the way water comes in when it is wet. I purchased 4 window shades for my leaf and now can have ventilation without getting wet. The aerodynamic design of the Leaf seems to allow more water to ingress than with other vehicles, so I think they are a necessity. About £42 on Amazon if memory serves.

Cheers and good luck with your purchase, Tony.
 

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I think I read somewhere that someone had written a 3rd party app to replace the Nissan one that is more reliable, or did I imagine that ?
Just about all the apps use the Nissan servers so you get no advantage. The only alternative is the OVMS3 which is an expensive solution.
Oh that's a real shame. The last three cars prior to the Ion including my current ICE have all had electric adjustment
I'm 6'5" and overweight but fit comfortably so think that you need to try any Gen2 car to see if it's good for you.
Car a thick bin bag for the flat tyre / wheel.
 

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DB- One thing I forgot to mention-the noise level. The wind shields I purchased for the windows do add some wind noise, dependent on ambient wind speed and direction, up to about 45mph there is little to no difference, most of the road surfaces are so bad in Dorset and Hampshire that most of the sound you hear is from the dreadful roads. It's a real pity, after 33 years in Perth I had forgotten all about the abundant potholes and bad surfaces here, but that's another issue. I took my wife's cousin and her hubby out for dinner last Saturday night and he kept on about how quiet it was. He drives a top-of-the-range newish merc., so that should tell you something. Now he wants one....boys and their toys eh?

EDIT: These are the wind deflectors I bought--Wind deflectors 4-pc HEKO tinted NISSAN LEAF mk1 5-doors hatchback 2010-2017 | eBay

and here are the LED's I bought in place of the main beam halogens...seem ok so far but extreme care is needed when fitting to ensure the beam pattern doesn't change and blind other drivers. https://www.amazon.co.uk/KATUR-H8-H9-H11-Waterproof/dp/B07QYDN1D2/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=KATUR+H8+H9+H11+Led+Headlight+Bulbs+Mini+Design+Upgraded+CREE+Chips+Extremely+Bright+12000+Lumens&link_code=qs&qid=1579028377&sourceid=Mozilla-search&sr=8-1
 

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for some peculiar reason known only to Nissan, they have LED low beams and halogen mains and filaments everywhere else.
The halogen mains are dreadful, worse than my classic ford popular I used to have, that gives you some idea how awful they are. I think the newer ones have full LED's but your price range precludes that.
It is a bit peculiar, the lighting setup, but I remind myself that the Leaf was released in 2011, when batteries were in excess of $1000 per kWh - the rest of the car had to be pared back to the absolute bone to hit any kind of price point.

Brake/Tail: LED
Chimsel: LED
Reverse lights: Incandescent
Rear Turn Signal: WY21W Incandescent
Number plate lights: Incandescent
Rear Fog: Incandescent

Dip Beam: LED (Tekna and Gen1), Halogen (H4, Acenta and Visia)
Main Beam: Halogen (H9 Tekna, H4 Acenta/Visia)
Sidelight: W5W incandescent
Front Turn Signal: WY21W Incandescent
Side repeater Turn signal: WY5W Incandescent

DRL: Incandescent
Front Fog: Incandescent

If bulb "tuning" is remotely your thing... I replaced all of the ambered bulbs with chromed amber ones on our leaf - it was white and reducing the pallet to get rid of the "fried egg" was a small but satisfying improvement I felt. Pics here: Sold - 2015 Nissan Leaf Tekna 24kWh
 

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A complete PITA. Now imagine the space saver scenario:

I notice a puncture, I spend maybe 10-15 minutes changing the wheel and stuff the original tyre in the boot somewhere. I then drive home normally delayed by perhaps half an hour, picking up partner and son, the following day I phone to order a tyre, then carefully drive to work for those few days on the space saver (I don't do more than 55mph normally anyway so 50 is not a hassle) until I can get the car into them, and they take the space saver off and fix the tyre.

Wow, that was easy. That's what it used to be like back in the days when cars routinely came with spare wheels! :LOL:
Or you could do as I have done and keep a full size steel wheel under a false floor in the boot.

Same 10-15 mins changing wheel
Damaged one fits in space the spare came from.
Drive around at normal speeds for unlimited journeys for a couple of days whilst getting quotes for repair/replacement.
Swap wheels back
 
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