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The LEAF (at least '64 onwards) appears to do this automatically. First time I went through the rigmarole of letting air out and watching the display drop, which got some funny looks at the filling station. :eek:
Since then I can confirm that the readout adjusts between at least 3 sets of wheels without having to use the forget function.
 

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Personally if your doing some mileage i'd leave them and swap them as the front wears down and replace them, so then the back wheels get the new set of tyres.
My rears have lasted near 56k on the car and are the original fit tyres and will be swapped done before summer is out for crossclimates.
Front tyres wear that bit more due to the extra nose weight in a leaf, but i also carry my speed in corners while coasting to save a bit of juice at times and because its so well planted so only get 20-25k out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #145 (Edited)
Front tyres always wear about 2 to 3 times faster than rears in a FWD car since the front tyres are doing the steering (lateral grip/slip angle when cornering especially if understeering) putting down all the power when accelerating (and sometimes enduring wheel spin/slip) and also doing about 70% of all braking.

I've never been a believer in just letting the front tyres wear down and then just replace them while letting the rears stay on for years longer - swapping fronts and rears when the fronts are about 1mm or more down on the rear so that they can equalise gets you the maximum mileage from the tyres, and also avoids running very old tyres on the rear that may be starting to go hard and losing their grip despite having plenty of tread. (Wait until the rear end spins out on a wet road because those ancient rear tyres have gone hard with age and have been overlooked because they still have plenty of tread...)

I'm also not a believer of always having the best tyres on the rear of a FWD car - nobody will care that the rear didn't spin out under hard braking if the nose plowed into the car in front of you due to the worst tyres being on the front where >70% of the braking is done...

Obviously you don't want good tyres on the front and bald ones on the back - that is dangerous, but if we're talking about 6mm vs 4mm tread depth then it's perfectly OK to move the 6mm tread to the front where extra grip is required vs the rear which just needs to follow and is not braking hard nor accelerating at all.

I've just recently done something similar on the Xantia where the front tyres were getting down maybe 2mm vs the rears which have hardly worn - swapped them to the rear and the handling is absolutely fine and safe, and I like to really push that car so I would know if the handling had become unsafe in any way.

I know the whole put your best tyres on the rear or front debate is quite controversial but provided that the worst tyres still have a decent amount of tread it can be beneficial for the best ones to be on the front on a FWD car and can sometimes even improve the handling balance slightly. Personally I prefer to rotate front to rear before the difference between them gets too significant.

Also keep in mind that the electronic stability control on modern cars will go a long way towards arresting any slight tendency for the rear of the car to step out even if it did happen. So the risk is even lower than it was with an old car like the Xantia that has no ESC or even traction control.
 

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Excellent. Just swap the wheels then. :)
I should have added the caveat that LEAFs have a disturbing tendency to wear the inside edges of the rear tyres (there's no adjustment on the camber) so swapping with the front is sensible where you wear the outside edge slightly faster ......
 

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Discussion Starter #147
I should have added the caveat that LEAFs have a disturbing tendency to wear the inside edges of the rear tyres (there's no adjustment on the camber) so swapping with the front is sensible where you wear the outside edge slightly faster ......
I'll keep an eye on that. The rear tyres look almost as new - 6 and a bit mm and no signs of wear on either shoulder. Fronts have some noticeable wear on the outside shoulders. I suspect all four tyres have been replaced at the same time and the car has then done quite a bit of mileage on them and is now starting to see normal wear on the front, and that front and rear have not been swapped yet and probably should have been a few thousand miles ago. They're still close enough together that it should be safe to swap the better ones to the front and from that point on they will start to equalise.
 

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What @Kingpleb1 was suggesting was to wear the fronts out, move the old rears to the front and put new tyres on the rear. Repeat each time, then you are never left with old rubber on the rear, you always have the greater tread on the rear and saves a lot of effort of moving tyres around.
 

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Discussion Starter #149
What @Kingpleb1 was suggesting was to wear the fronts out, move the old rears to the front and put new tyres on the rear. Repeat each time, then you are never left with old rubber on the rear, you always have the greater tread on the rear and saves a lot of effort of moving tyres around.
That's fine if you believe that it's best to always have the best tyres on the rear of a FWD car, something which while being "popular wisdom" I don't subscribe to. The front tyres work much harder and do much more, so the roles of the tyres and demands placed on them are not the same at all. The rear tyres get an easy life and it shows in the wear rates. By rights a FWD car should have slightly larger tyres on the front for better handling just like some RWD cars have slightly larger tyres on the rear.

If you rotate front to rear when the tread depth at the front is more than about 1mm below the rear you keep them nice and even anyway. Maybe not something that most people can be bothered with doing, (especially if they're paying someone else to do it) but I'm not scared of swapping tyres around once a year... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #150 (Edited)
I finally have Connected services set up! Only took a week of email and phone calls with a two day wait between every interaction with Nissan support...

At first I couldn't get the verification stage to go through at all (where it asks you to turn the car on for a minute then off again) but I eventually remembered that I'd disabled "data upload" in connected services settings when I'd realised the car was still attached to a previous account.

This seems to prevent the verification stage working, as soon as I reset connected services back to defaults (which turns data upload on again) it went through straight away.

I've been testing it quite a bit tonight and it, err, actually seems to work properly. :p I know, I know, wait until peak hours and it will let me down. :)

The refresh option to retrieve current state of the car such as battery SoC is quite slow (takes a minute or two) and does sometimes time out, and occasionally the app asks me to log in again if I haven't used it for a while (although it rememberes the credentials so I just press OK and don't have to retype anything) however so far stopping and starting climate control and starting charging has a 100% success rate with a delay of between 20 seconds and a minute or so before the car responds, and every time the car responds I get a notification back to the phone that the action has succeeded. So it seems that sending commands to the car is more reliable than retrieving its state.

Another thing I noticed is that while the You+Nissan web portal login is notoriously unreliable and gives errors that my login details couldn't be confirmed half the time, this doesn't seem to affect the phone app, which so far has not given a single credential failure.

I see in the iOS app store that the app was only updated less than two weeks ago with the version prior to that released in December last year - perhaps this brand new version addresses some reliability issues ?

One odd behaviour I notice with pre-heating is that if the battery is not fully charged and there is a charge timer preventing it charging, if you enable remote climate control it always draws the full 6kW - meaning that if the heater isn't consuming most of it the remainder goes to the battery and charges the battery even though I haven't triggered a remote charge start. I managed to gain 15% charge on the battery just in the time I was testing turning remote climate control on/off a few times...

Given that you can't stop a charge remotely but you can stop climate control remotely, this is an interesting loophole to allow you to effectively start charging and then stop it part way through, all remotely as once the cabin is up to temperature the heater uses little power and most then goes to the battery.
 

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Simon says- "Given that you can't stop a charge remotely but you can stop climate control remotely, this is an interesting loophole to allow you to effectively start charging and then stop it part way through, all remotely as once the cabin is up to temperature the heater uses little power and most then goes to the battery."

- That's a very interesting observation, and it is probably worth getting others on here to check it out and verify that is happening on theirs. I'll certainly give it a go. You're an apple fanboy, it will be interesting to see if the app behaves the same on a more civilized platform:p!
 

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Discussion Starter #152 (Edited)
- That's a very interesting observation, and it is probably worth getting others on here to check it out and verify that is happening on theirs. I'll certainly give it a go. You're an apple fanboy, it will be interesting to see if the app behaves the same on a more civilized platform:p!
Keeping in mind that remote climate start while plugged in is limited to 2 hours so you would get at most 2 hours charging although you could restart it. It also may not work very well with a 3kW charger as the heater would be using a larger share of what was available. But it's an interesting hack if the car is plugged in on the charge timer and you want to put a bit more charge in remotely and then stop it again remotely at a certain point. It's a shame there isn't a proper stop mode for the charge start function.

One other interesting thing I noticed (or confirmed, as I've seen it described on another forum) is that remote climate control (and presumably timer as well) only uses the resistance heater if the car is plugged in, but uses the heat pump if the car is not plugged in...(clearly shown in Leafspy)

I guess the assumption is that when plugged in there isn't a shortage of power so the heat pump isn't needed - and the resistance heater is faster to warm up and hotter so does a faster job of melting ice. But when not plugged in the heat pump is used to do a slower but more efficient job.

Another possible reason is that the resistance heater is silent (just the inside blower fan which is inaudible from outside) while the heat pump brings on the radiator fan and the heat pump itself - which are both moderately audible from outside the car, especially on a still morning. Perhaps it's considered more neighbour friendly for plugged in pre-heat / remote-heat to not bring on the "noisy" radiator fan and compressor unnecessarily ?
 

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One odd behaviour I notice with pre-heating is that if the battery is not fully charged and there is a charge timer preventing it charging, if you enable remote climate control it always draws the full 6kW - meaning that if the heater isn't consuming most of it the remainder goes to the battery and charges the battery even though I haven't triggered a remote charge start. I managed to gain 15% charge on the battery just in the time I was testing turning remote climate control on/off a few times...

Given that you can't stop a charge remotely but you can stop climate control remotely, this is an interesting loophole to allow you to effectively start charging and then stop it part way through, all remotely as once the cabin is up to temperature the heater uses little power and most then goes to the battery.
Yes, this is annoying with variable tariffs as if you don't want the inefficiencies of running the climate control from the battery then you start charging at what is a potentially a more expensive time, and equally you may end up with a higher level of charge than intended.

My experience was that this was a worse issue with the LEAF24 as it went past the 80% limit that you could set on that. I never discovered whether the climate control turns off if you leave it - I presume that it does after a certain length of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #154
According to the notification that comes back through the app when you enable remote climate control, it will run for 2 hours plugged in or 15 minutes unplugged from the time you start it.

On the other hand the climate timer seems to be a departure timer where the heating runs for an indeterminate amount of time up until the departure time (presumably calculated based on how cold the interior is and how long it will take to reach the target set point) then switches off at the nominated departure time.
 

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According to the notification that comes back through the app when you enable remote climate control, it will run for 2 hours plugged in or 15 minutes unplugged from the time you start it.
Interesting - I obviously failed to read that. Two hours on a LEAF30 with a 6.6kW obc is about 50% of the battery capacity so will not be a good idea at the wrong time on certain tariffs.
 

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Discussion Starter #156
Well you would presumably only manually command the climate control on remotely using the app 15-20 minutes before you leave ? And if you change your mind about leaving you can remotely command it off again. The two hours only applies to manually turning it on remotely and then leaving it.

The in car timer only seems to bring it on just long enough before the departure time to get up to temperature, so not very long. (About 20 mins when I tried it)

Note: timing the climate control through the app is different to setting it in the car.

The timer in the app seems to be server side where the server simply delays sending your command to the car until the set time. However the car sees it as a manual remote request and would thus run for 2 hours plugged in unless you stopped it.
 

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The remote climate can turn on and off within this 15/120min window as it just aims to reach the set temp you have set on the dash. once it hits that it turns off or to a very very low level and waits for the temp to go out of range again.

Its great in the summer when your on a freevend and want to keep the car cool as it will never reach 16'c on my leaf with a black car and black interior in bright sun its a heat magnet so will run AC almost constantly.
For heating it does the same and is great when there is Ice or Snow on the car as the cabin gets upto temp, then shuts off... cools down a bit and then comes back on. Specially when the temp is set to 30'c its on for ages :D

On the tyres front as @i-s was saying, its the old move forward and replace technique. for me it works fine as i go thru at least one set of front tyres a year and this year the rears have just lasted ages due to them being the enasave tyres and me doing so many motorway miles but they are coming upto the limiter now so crossclimates will go on them and the current cross climates on the front will move to the back with 5mm+ of tread still on them and the circle of tyre life continues :) I've only broken my newest on the rear mantra in this leaf as the tyres have worn so well and with lockdown still going it was impossible nearly to get booked in, and my mileage dropped to about 2k/pcm
 

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At first I couldn't get the verification stage to go through at all (where it asks you to turn the car on for a minute then off again) but I eventually remembered that I'd disabled "data upload" in connected services settings when I'd realised the car was still attached to a previous account.

This seems to prevent the verification stage working, as soon as I reset connected services back to defaults (which turns data upload on again) it went through straight away.
This is interesting. I bought my first Leaf (2016 Acenta with 30kwh/6.6kw) on Monday and haven't had any joy getting through the verification stage despite trying several times now. I'm intrigued by what you said above about disabling the data upload services in the settings. Could you tell me how would that be done?

Despite buying the car in Scotland, it's clearly made its way here from the previous owner in Ireland, as all of the satnav bookmarks were places around there. What concerns me is that it's still tied to the previous owner in other ways, although the Nissan website says "Your vehicle has been added recently to the portal." when I try to do the fruitless ownership verification.
 

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Discussion Starter #159
Simon says- "Given that you can't stop a charge remotely but you can stop climate control remotely, this is an interesting loophole to allow you to effectively start charging and then stop it part way through, all remotely as once the cabin is up to temperature the heater uses little power and most then goes to the battery."

- That's a very interesting observation, and it is probably worth getting others on here to check it out and verify that is happening on theirs. I'll certainly give it a go. You're an apple fanboy, it will be interesting to see if the app behaves the same on a more civilized platform:p!
Looks like I should test a bit more thoroughly before posting! :rolleyes:

I thought I would use this trick to do 2 hours of timed charging tonight and luckily I was monitoring it with Leafspy. It turns out when you turn on remote climate control while plugged in the battery does indeed charge at full speed (minus climate control consumption which is very little in tonights mild weather) however after approx 15 minutes the battery charge rate dropped down from 6kW to just a few hundred watts - on average equal to the amount consumed by the heat pump as the heat pump continued to operate.

So, false alarm, sorry! The reason I got so much charge during last nights testing is due to stopping and starting remote climate control many times - each time would have given up to 15 minutes worth of charging at full speed, enough to bump the SoC up a few percent each time.
 

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Discussion Starter #160
This is interesting. I bought my first Leaf (2016 Acenta with 30kwh/6.6kw) on Monday and haven't had any joy getting through the verification stage despite trying several times now. I'm intrigued by what you said above about disabling the data upload services in the settings. Could you tell me how would that be done?

Despite buying the car in Scotland, it's clearly made its way here from the previous owner in Ireland, as all of the satnav bookmarks were places around there. What concerns me is that it's still tied to the previous owner in other ways, although the Nissan website says "Your vehicle has been added recently to the portal." when I try to do the fruitless ownership verification.
So you were definitely able to add your VIN number to the You+Nissan portal, and the car is now shown there ? If so, then don't worry, it is no longer attached to the previous owners account.

In my case the car was still on the previous owners account and when I tried to add the VIN number it said the car was already registered on another account and I couldn't get any further.

The week of emails etc to Nissan was to get the car removed from the previous owners account. I emailed copies of my drivers license and new V5C and apart from it taking a long time the process was fairly easy. They didn't just delete it from the previous owners account, they actually added it to my You+Nissan account which I had previously created, so in the end I didn't have to do the VIN adding process myself.

I tried maybe 5 times to get the verification of ownership of the car process to work without luck - it just stalled at the step after telling you to turn the car off.

So what I did on the car was go into settings, nissan connect services, then used "initialise all nissan connect svcs settings", and after that also went into "data upload settings" and made sure share vehicle information was enabled.

I don't know for sure whether it was the initialise option or just turning back on data upload settings (which I had previously disabled when I found the previous owner would still have access) which solved it, but the very next attempt went through.

Also the email from nissan support who set up the car on my account said to turn the car on for 5 minutes rather than the one minute that the website says, so maybe give that a try. The activation completed for me in a couple of minutes and before I had turned the car off again.

Good luck!
 
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