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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I live in an apartment building without an EV charger. I'm thinking about how I would charge an EV if I had one (which I don't). I think I would basically limit my mileage as much as possible and then take the car to a local public charging station once in a while (hopefully no more than once a week). I would leave the car charging at the station for 4-8 hours...while I find something to do during that time. Maybe I would bring my bike and ride someplace.

Alternatively, or in addition to this, I could charge a portable battery in my apartment and wheel it out to my car once in a while to charge from the portable battery.

My landlady already told me she doesn't want extension cords around the place, so that eliminates the possibility of dangling a cord from my patio into the parking lot. ;)


My question: does anyone actually do this (use a portable battery and/or make regular, lengthy trips to public charging stations)?


Thanks,
Be
 

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30KW Tekna (2017)
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Goodness think of the losses!

Ac to Dc, then dc to ac, to granny to dc

Why not just use a rapid charger?
 

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A number of people only use public charge points but accept higher electricity costs and greater than difficulty.
Do you have access to Rapids or chargers that you can walk to/from home/work?
 

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And the cost of the equipment and your time going back and forth , why not just rent another apartment with a socket
 

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I don’t have a home charger, it’s amazing what you can find to do for exercise in remote car parks and woodlands for a few hours!

:ROFLMAO:
 

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Using just public chargers if that's all that's available to you where you live has got to be better and definitely more economical compared to filling a car with fuel and having the hassle of servicing and repairs that all ICE cars suffer more than EVs
 

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Offer to pay your landlady $50 a month for the “inconvenience” oF having a cable overnight for 3 days a week, she’ll come round!
 

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Look on Plugshare, see what charging options are around you and see if you can make something work around your routine. Is there a DC Fast charger at a local grocery store or a gym that you visit for example? An AC Charging station in walking distance from your home that you could leave the car at overnight every now and then? Or somewhere close to your workplace, or even better, if your workplace would consider installing a charge point?

Since public charging is your only option, ensure that there is more than one viable option in case that location's charging equipment breaks down, or is busy when you need to use it. And when picking a car make sure you go for one that has plenty of range for your needs, and that has fast rapid charge speeds so you aren't having to go out of your way to plug in and wait around all the time.

I have managed for years without having the ability to charge at home, both in the UK and in the US. It can work just fine, but as others have mentioned above, if you are moving to EV for cost savings, you're not going to get such an impressive result compared to others who can charge at home since you're going to be paying more for electricity for the most part.
 

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Also why not flip it around, rather than charge each night at home, why not ask your employer if you can charge at work? Even if you offer to pay power.
 

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Hi,

I live in an apartment building without an EV charger. I'm thinking about how I would charge an EV if I had one (which I don't). I think I would basically limit my mileage as much as possible and then take the car to a local public charging station once in a while (hopefully no more than once a week). I would leave the car charging at the station for 4-8 hours...while I find something to do during that time. Maybe I would bring my bike and ride someplace.

Alternatively, or in addition to this, I could charge a portable battery in my apartment and wheel it out to my car once in a while to charge from the portable battery.

My landlady already told me she doesn't want extension cords around the place, so that eliminates the possibility of dangling a cord from my patio into the parking lot. ;)


My question: does anyone actually do this (use a portable battery and/or make regular, lengthy trips to public charging stations)?


Thanks,
Be
No, totally crazy idea on every level.

Better to move home to an apartment that offers charging facilities in site.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Don't DC fast chargers degrade the battery? I've read that they are not for regular use, only for the occasional long trip.

Also, regarding the expense of public charging stations, the ones I have around my place are all labeled "cost: $0". Could that be for real?

I don't want to change apartments because I consider my current apartment to be my home.

For reasons I don't want to discuss, I can't count on electricity generation at my job.

Thanks for your responses, everyone.

Goodness think of the losses!

Ac to Dc, then dc to ac, to granny to dc

Why not just use a rapid charger?
 

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I would just warn that FREE charging will likely end at some point. Also being FREE means its likely to be used a lot of the time, and increasingly so as more EVs are bought. A paid charger is much more likely to be available and maintained to use when you want it. Personally I would not have an EV without home charging of some sort. Good luck.
 

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We used public charging for 6 weeks while we waited for our home charger to be fitted, bonus was it was free and only 20 min walk away. Even used to chuck the bike in the back of the Zoe as I could cycle there or back in 5 min. Even after we got the home charger we still took advantage of the free charging as it saved £12 in charging costs per week. Eventually though we got a smart meter so could take advantage of cheaper tariffs and now we just charge from home as its only costing £5 a week, I guess we're not that tight at saving money after all LOL!
 

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Hi,

I live in an apartment building without an EV charger. I'm thinking about how I would charge an EV if I had one (which I don't). I think I would basically limit my mileage as much as possible and then take the car to a local public charging station once in a while (hopefully no more than once a week). I would leave the car charging at the station for 4-8 hours...while I find something to do during that time. Maybe I would bring my bike and ride someplace.

Alternatively, or in addition to this, I could charge a portable battery in my apartment and wheel it out to my car once in a while to charge from the portable battery.

My landlady already told me she doesn't want extension cords around the place, so that eliminates the possibility of dangling a cord from my patio into the parking lot. ;)


My question: does anyone actually do this (use a portable battery and/or make regular, lengthy trips to public charging stations)?


Thanks,
Be
Hi there

We had exactly the same considerations before diving into EV ownership earlier this year.

We live in an apartment in central London and have to rely totally on public charging. We are fortunate in that we have 6 Polar (7kw or 3kw) charging stations, 2 Source London (22kw) and over 20 Ubritricity (3 kw) lampost chargers all within 5 - 10 minutes walk from home so there is nearly always something available when I need a charge. (Prior to lockdown) we changed our shopping habits and went to supermarkets that had (free) chargers - even a quick hour top up while you pop in for coffee or groceries at these is worth while.

Check your local area using Zap Map ( Map of charging points for electric car drivers in UK: Zap-Map ) to see what public charging is nearby. Which area are you in? (some are better than others - parts of London are particularly dense with chargers) Some leisure/retail locations also have chargers taht may be an option.

You should be able to get by on these local AC charges and save the rapid DC charging for when you are on a longer trip.

Happy Zap Mapping !

Good luck.
 

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Welcome. Where about in USA are you? In EV enlightened states there are rules allowing you to install charging in apartment complexes and companies who specialise in that market, but they vary state to state.

What is your motivation for considering an EV? With low cost of gas in most states it isn't likely you would save much money, especially if you have to pay for public charging.

We didn't buy our Model S in Florida to save money, although the lifetime Supercharging does help on long road trips ;)
 

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Hi,

I live in an apartment building without an EV charger. I'm thinking about how I would charge an EV if I had one (which I don't). I think I would basically limit my mileage as much as possible and then take the car to a local public charging station once in a while (hopefully no more than once a week). I would leave the car charging at the station for 4-8 hours...while I find something to do during that time. Maybe I would bring my bike and ride someplace.

Alternatively, or in addition to this, I could charge a portable battery in my apartment and wheel it out to my car once in a while to charge from the portable battery.

My landlady already told me she doesn't want extension cords around the place, so that eliminates the possibility of dangling a cord from my patio into the parking lot. ;)


My question: does anyone actually do this (use a portable battery and/or make regular, lengthy trips to public charging stations)?


Thanks,
Be
Is there a socket in your parking area? If there is a place you can charge, you don't need to do this, as you can buy a portable home ev charger for your car
 

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Some good advice above...no one has commented on the other part of your plan - charging from a secondary battery that you charge in your apartment then carry to the vehicle. That's because it won't work. Aside from the voltage and conversion required / losses incurred, a battery big enough to give anything approaching a useful range would be impossibly heavy and expensive. Public charging (or charging directly to the vehicle somehow) is your only option.
 

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Is there a socket in your parking area? If there is a place you can charge, you don't need to do this, as you can buy a portable home ev charger for your car
Bear in mind OP is in USA so the most likely socket in the parking area is 110V at 15A which is Level 1 charging. It is painfully slow - we used one when staying at timeshare in Key West and it took us several days of being parked up to get a useful charge.

In many cases it won't be allowed to use such a socket as electric will be paid by condo association. They probably already have a rule saying "no" - those with experience of home owners associations in USA will know how they like their rules!
 
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