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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've have had a VW Golf GTE for 5 years now. My wife and I think that it's getting long in the tooth, and expensive decisions are imminent. We are therefore looking at a full EV, namely the E-Niro 4+. But it's such a different world. The GTE hybrid had no range anxiety - if we run out of electrons we use the ICE. Simples.
But with an EV, planning a long journey seems fraught with worry.
ABRP recommended an Osprey charge point in a Travelodge. Can anyone just drive into a hotel and start charging?
Do public charge points always have cables attached, or do we have to travel with both cables with us all the time, just in case?
Is there a way of finding out which charge points are free and which aren't?
It used to be take a break, toilet, coffee, move on - 20 mins at most. Now planning seems to require take a break, toilet, sit down meal, move on - stationary time nearer an hour. Does one get used to this new world?
Silverback (and wife)
 

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We've have had a VW Golf GTE for 5 years now. My wife and I think that it's getting long in the tooth, and expensive decisions are imminent. We are therefore looking at a full EV, namely the E-Niro 4+. But it's such a different world. The GTE hybrid had no range anxiety - if we run out of electrons we use the ICE. Simples.
But with an EV, planning a long journey seems fraught with worry.
ABRP recommended an Osprey charge point in a Travelodge. Can anyone just drive into a hotel and start charging?
Do public charge points always have cables attached, or do we have to travel with both cables with us all the time, just in case?
Is there a way of finding out which charge points are free and which aren't?
It used to be take a break, toilet, coffee, move on - 20 mins at most. Now planning seems to require take a break, toilet, sit down meal, move on - stationary time nearer an hour. Does one get used to this new world?
Silverback (and wife)
The e-Niro has such a good range that you are not very likely to suffer from range anxiety.
Depends on the hotel whether you can use their charge points without becoming customers.

Rapid chargers always have cables attached - you could not be expected to carry the weight of a cable which can carry more than 50 kilowatts. Fast chargers (up to 11 kilowatts) do not usually have cables attached so you need your own cables for these. However they are so slow that they are mainly useful for destination chargers.

Some charging networks (e.g. Ecotricity) have an app which shows which chargers are in use.
 

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Kia e Niro 2020
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Agreed, I think the range of the E-niro would mean even a 300/400 mile trip will only need 1 stop to charge... circa. 45 mins or so... enough for a wee, leg stretch and something to eat. That is only 25 mins more than you would normally stop for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. What's the fastest a 4+ can charge at? It doesn't have a Chademo connector does it? Can it then use a 50Kw charging point - and if so, what current is it taking?
:confused:
Thanks
Silverback
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020
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You're getting over 200 MPH rapid charging with an e-Niro (or Soul or Kona) as long as you stay in the optimal 10-80% range and can find a 75+ kW charger. Newer cars will have even faster charging.

IMO the main issue is infrastructure, since obviously rapid charging at fast speeds relies on the chargers supporting those speeds, on top of all the usual reliability concerns.

Honestly even without COVID, I bet we'd have to use public charging maybe 5 times over the 3 year lease of the car. It's not a dealbreaker by any means.
 

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Humanity seems to be psychologically resistant to changing and yet quite good at adapting to change once that change has occurred. I suspect there is an evolutionary reason. Just before you get an EV, you probably lean towards thinking "this is a bit scary" but a short while after it you may be more at "this is fine".

Long journeys are worse because there is some hassle and not all charging points are reliable in the UK by the look of the posts on this forum (although I don't currently live in the UK). But the time spent at charging stations is won back by not having to go to the petrol station local journeys.

Do do some advance planning like checking if you have to download an app for your chosen charging station or not or if you can register a payment card in advance or whatever and having a plan B (e.g. plan to arrive to charger with 50 miles of range remaining and then you already know as you pull up what other charger you will use if A charger doesn't work).
 

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Thanks for the replies. What's the fastest a 4+ can charge at? It doesn't have a Chademo connector does it? Can it then use a 50Kw charging point - and if so, what current is it taking?
:confused:
Thanks
Silverback
The eNiro has CCS.
You should get around 45-48 kw/h from a 50Kw charger
Mine is a first edition & fastest I've seen was 68kw at an ionity 150 station.

I've driven from Edinburgh to the south of France in it in 2.5 days. The only extra long stop we did was after arriving at one service area to find the charger in use we decided we had just enough to get to the next one. We arrived just as another eNiro was plugging in. Had to wait for them.

Most times we find that by the time we had something to eat and a walk the car was done

Sent using Tapatalk (I'm on my phone so sorry for any auto correct screwups)
 

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'19 i3 120Ah / '20 Kona 64kWh / '21 e208
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Is there a way of finding out which charge points are free and which aren't?
ZapMap, WattsApp and PlugShare apps - and/or the apps of most of the individual networks will tell you this - for eg the Instavolt app.

In ABRP, you can tell it to only route you via your preferred networks and/or avoid specific chargers completely. Plus, it will also by default prefer charging location that have more than one charger and are >50kW.

With a car with range like the eNiro, and now that chargers are dotted around much more frequently, you can essentially choose how long you want to stop for in most circumstances. A longer stop (obviously) means you can drive for longer until the next stop. A shorter stop means you get going again sooner, but will need to stop for another short charge sooner. ABRP helps here - it’s aim is always to get you from A to B in the shortest overall time (taking into account the charging curve of the car and any charger preferences that you may have set).

I find that 25-30 min stops go by quickly. Longer than that can start to drag, unless you’re using time to have a proper meal or something like that. The charging speed of the eNiro is good compared to many shorter range cars, but is nowadays fairly slow when compared to other longer range cars with similar sized batteries.

Have a go with putting the eNiro into ABRP for a really long trip - for example -I’ll hopefully (Covid permitting) drive my Kona (essentially the same underneath as the eNiro) from London to the South of France in the summer. According to ABRP, the total journey will involve 3h13m of charging, across 5 stops - ranging from 20 m to just over an hour. It’s 12-13 hours of driving so even in a diesel car with 600-ish miles to a tank I’d still be stopping for a fuel up, some food, a few loo beaks etc. The actual difference in total journey time is probably nearer to 1 hour.
 

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The main difference, I find, is not so much the time but more the impact on flexibility. With an ICE car you have more flexibility - for now at least. If I drove a diesel car to the south of France we could choose to take our break stops where-ever we wanted - within reason - provided they weren’t too far from the general route. We could detour slightly to a nice quaint village for lunch, and then later take some breaks at various beauty spots. The diesel fill up could happen pretty much anywhere within the last 300 miles of the trip.

In most EVs - even many longer range ones like the eNiro and Kona - there is currently less flexibility - and you have to accept that and be comfortable with it. For eg, in order for the total journey time for the trip to France to only be within an hour or so of the diesel, we will need to stop at specific points - namely where there are ultra rapid chargers. That means eating there too - either in the motorway service area restaurants or picnicking. And any detours to visit quaint villages or beauty spots are of course doable (provided they don’t eat into the planned range of the leg too much) but they will just add time to the journey - you still need to take the other breaks at designated locations so the car can charge.

Flexibility with EVs is improving as more rapid and ultra rapid chargers are installed - but it will be several years at least until they offer the same sort of flexibility as most ICE cars do now.

Personally, I’m completely comfortable with this though - as (especially if you have off-street parking) they are more convenient than ICE cars for the majority of the time - especially if most destinations are within, say, 45% range of home all year round.
 

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In US e Niro 2020 can be charged on CCS Connector found at charging stations . E Niro can accept 100kw/h charging rate.
Thanks for the replies. What's the fastest a 4+ can charge at? It doesn't have a Chademo connector does it? Can it then use a 50Kw charging point - and if so, what current is it taking?
:confused:
Thanks
Silverback
 

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Kia e Niro 2020
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ZapMap, WattsApp and PlugShare apps - and/or the apps of most of the individual networks will tell you this - for eg the Instavolt app.

In ABRP, you can tell it to only route you via your preferred networks and/or avoid specific chargers completely. Plus, it will also by default prefer charging location that have more than one charger and are >50kW.

With a car with range like the eNiro, and now that chargers are dotted around much more frequently, you can essentially choose how long you want to stop for in most circumstances. A longer stop (obviously) means you can drive for longer until the next stop. A shorter stop means you get going again sooner, but will need to stop for another short charge sooner. ABRP helps here - it’s aim is always to get you from A to B in the shortest overall time (taking into account the charging curve of the car and any charger preferences that you may have set).

I find that 25-30 min stops go by quickly. Longer than that can start to drag, unless you’re using time to have a proper meal or something like that. The charging speed of the eNiro is good compared to many shorter range cars, but is nowadays fairly slow when compared to other longer range cars with similar sized batteries.

Have a go with putting the eNiro into ABRP for a really long trip - for example -I’ll hopefully (Covid permitting) drive my Kona (essentially the same underneath as the eNiro) from London to the South of France in the summer. According to ABRP, the total journey will involve 3h13m of charging, across 5 stops - ranging from 20 m to just over an hour. It’s 12-13 hours of driving so even in a diesel car with 600-ish miles to a tank I’d still be stopping for a fuel up, some food, a few loo beaks etc. The actual difference in total journey time is probably nearer to 1 hour.
Apologies for my ignorance, what is ABRP?
 

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We've have had a VW Golf GTE for 5 years now. My wife and I think that it's getting long in the tooth, and expensive decisions are imminent. We are therefore looking at a full EV, namely the E-Niro 4+. But it's such a different world. The GTE hybrid had no range anxiety - if we run out of electrons we use the ICE. Simples.
But with an EV, planning a long journey seems fraught with worry.
ABRP recommended an Osprey charge point in a Travelodge. Can anyone just drive into a hotel and start charging?
Do public charge points always have cables attached, or do we have to travel with both cables with us all the time, just in case?
Is there a way of finding out which charge points are free and which aren't?
It used to be take a break, toilet, coffee, move on - 20 mins at most. Now planning seems to require take a break, toilet, sit down meal, move on - stationary time nearer an hour. Does one get used to this new world?
Silverback (and wife)
If you go for the e-Niro you won't regret it. As others advise, just plan your charging stops with a fallback option on a long journey. You soon stop worrying. That said, it might be worth holding your horses; there are some interesting new EVs in the offing, not least from VAG and Hyundai/Kia, which will probably hit the sweet spot as regards range, namely WLTP of around 310-320 miles. They will give you a decent stint at the wheel between stops on the motorway, which is what counts when you're going places, as opposed to touring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just want to say a big thank you to everyone who replied. Your postings have been very positive and encouraging (no trolling here). As a result, we have (literally) just placed an order for an E-Niro.
Hope you're all right!!
Thanks again 🍫🍫🍫
Silverback (and SWMBO)

Richard Wood : Thanks for your comments. My car mad friend is telling me that there are new Kia cars pending, better chassis, two motors etc etc. but car manufacturers never stop developing, and there is always something better, just a short while away.:) At our age, this may well be the last car we buy, and our GTE is getting a bit long in the tooth. A hybrid is a very complex vehicle, and there is a lot to go (very expensively) wrong. So we've calculated that we should change now while it's going OK and trust in the Kia 7 year warranty. It's just the new world we have to get used to, as mentioned in my OP. Thanks for the contribution. (y)
 

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Just want to say a big thank you to everyone who replied. Your postings have been very positive and encouraging (no trolling here). As a result, we have (literally) just placed an order for an E-Niro.
Hope you're all right!!
Thanks again 🍫🍫🍫
Silverback (and SWMBO)

Richard Wood : Thanks for your comments. My car mad friend is telling me that there are new Kia cars pending, better chassis, two motors etc etc. but car manufacturers never stop developing, and there is always something better, just a short while away.:) At our age, this may well be the last car we buy, and our GTE is getting a bit long in the tooth. A hybrid is a very complex vehicle, and there is a lot to go (very expensively) wrong. So we've calculated that we should change now while it's going OK and trust in the Kia 7 year warranty. It's just the new world we have to get used to, as mentioned in my OP. Thanks for the contribution. (y)
I was in the same boat when I ordered our e-Niro 'off plans' as it were in December 2018. Time not on our side!🙄
 
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