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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm looking to finalize an EV purchase in the next few weeks. In all the excitement, test drives, and research it dawned on me...what about home charging!? Realistically when should I approach a home installation company to get an idea of the feasibility and costs of installing a home kit?
 

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If you plan to apply for the Gov't grant for a charger unit you will need to show as a minimum a signed order form contract for the purchase of a BEV so that your selected installer can process the paperwork involved. It seems from your comment that you not yet at that stage though. Once the purchase contract is available that is a good time to begin the process as frequently there can be quite a delay involved even with a perfectly straightforward installation. There can often be some unforeseen glitch that can raise problems, and an early start will reveal those and give time to overcome any technical difficulty. Many installers do not visit to survey though and will rely on photos of your existing meter and CU as well as drawings of a suitable cable route. That process can start anytime.
 

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So I'm looking to finalize an EV purchase in the next few weeks. In all the excitement, test drives, and research it dawned on me...what about home charging!? Realistically when should I approach a home installation company to get an idea of the feasibility and costs of installing a home kit?
I think the sooner you get an idea of costs and maybe options, the sooner you can formulate your opinion as to which way to go with respect to EVSE and if applicable, installers you feel happy to use
 

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Jubby, the above replies all have merit. As long as you get a Granny cable when you collect it/have it delivered, that's all you'll need for a while. Overnight charging at home at 8A (or similar, about 2kW) should suffice for the few weeks' wait you'll endure while waiting for a 7kW job.
 

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So I'm looking to finalize an EV purchase in the next few weeks. In all the excitement, test drives, and research it dawned on me...what about home charging!? Realistically when should I approach a home installation company to get an idea of the feasibility and costs of installing a home kit?
Do you have your own driveway?
Have you been in touch with your DNO to check on cutout fuse rating.?
Is your house fully electric already, shower, cooker, heatpump? What is the peak electric load.?
Do you have a SMETS2 smart meter.
Have you thought about where you want the EVSE aka charger sited. Do you know if there is a obvious cabling route to that site from your meter.
How old are your house electrics eg new build last 5 years, pre-war.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you plan to apply for the Gov't grant for a charger unit you will need to show as a minimum a signed order form contract for the purchase of a BEV so that your selected installer can process the paperwork involved. It seems from your comment that you not yet at that stage though. Once the purchase contract is available that is a good time to begin the process as frequently there can be quite a delay involved even with a perfectly straightforward installation. There can often be some unforeseen glitch that can raise problems, and an early start will reveal those and give time to overcome any technical difficulty. Many installers do not visit to survey though and will rely on photos of your existing meter and CU as well as drawings of a suitable cable route. That process can start anytime.
Cheers for the insight, particularly as I do plan on taking advantage of the Govt. grant. And you're absolutely right, I haven't even finalised a choice in EV (hopefully in the next few weeks) but will be sure to hit the ground running when I do!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think the sooner you get an idea of costs and maybe options, the sooner you can formulate your opinion as to which way to go with respect to EVSE and if applicable, installers you feel happy to use
Cheers Somex. And yes I think you did a good job on reading between the lines. From what research I've done, I expect to pay about £800-1000 for a home install. Obviously there are a few different providers now in the market, so the ability to shop around may not only be helpful, but take time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Jubby, the above replies all have merit. As long as you get a Granny cable when you collect it/have it delivered, that's all you'll need for a while. Overnight charging at home at 8A (or similar, about 2kW) should suffice for the few weeks' wait you'll endure while waiting for a 7kW job.
Definitely. Equally, I have also thought about not rushing into a decision and charge from a granny setup until I've gotten used to the conversion from ICE to EV, but also to see how well it integrates into my daily life/general lifestyle.

But then again fast charging options in my area are fairly limited and I'm not sure how feasible it will be to rely solely on trickle charging from a 3-pin setup will be. I'm just mindful that nothing is typically straight forward, and living in a home that is 100+ years old, I'm almost certain it will take time for an installer to survey a solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Do you have your own driveway?
Have you been in touch with your DNO to check on cutout fuse rating.?
Is your house fully electric already, shower, cooker, heatpump? What is the peak electric load.?
Do you have a SMETS2 smart meter.
Have you thought about where you want the EVSE aka charger sited. Do you know if there is a obvious cabling route to that site from your meter.
How old are your house electrics eg new build last 5 years, pre-war.
Yes, I do (luckily) Freddy.

  1. I've only previously made contact with my DNO with the setting up of a smart meter (which due to COVID, and attempted rescheduling of engineers since March last year) still hasn't happened.
  2. House is not fully electric. Gas for hob (which we will be converting to electric in a few month's time) and combi-boiler. Not sure about peak load but we typically use about 10kwh per day (it's gone up since both my wife and I started working from home since Covid).
  3. No smart meter (see first comment)
  4. Yes, realistically because of the convenience of having a drive (end of terrace unit) we have a side gate that runs next to our gas/electrical mains. From what I can see from surveys past, it should more or less be a direct line.
  5. House was built in the 1930s; not sure on the age of internal wiring but we had an updated consumer unit installed two years back (the original was a fuse board o_O).
 

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Cheers James for the info; this makes sense. If you don't me asking, which make/model did you go with?
I got a Myenergi ZAPPI fitted by the approved installer, that was June 2018, I think the grant has been cut since then.
I could have had a charger fitted free but I have solar panels and their charger did not take advantage of SOLAR, also Myenenergi will charge the car at the lowest cost per KWh anytime the sun does not shine enough, all I have to do is plug it in when I come home and it will be charged for the next time I need it
 

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Cheers Somex. And yes I think you did a good job on reading between the lines. From what research I've done, I expect to pay about £800-1000 for a home install. Obviously there are a few different providers now in the market, so the ability to shop around may not only be helpful, but take time.
Judging by forum members experiences, both the service provided and indeed the prices quoted by installers varies from “let’s discuss this further” to “piddle off, go forth and multiply ,you are having a laugh”😂and yes, the luxury of having time to do your research is most beneficial
 

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. . . I have also thought about not rushing into a decision and charge from a granny setup until I've gotten used to the conversion from ICE to EV, but also to see how well it integrates into my daily life/general lifestyle. . .
Rather than a 'proper' wall outlet, you might consider having a 32A 'Commando' socket fitted (and tell your local sparks that you're thinking of buying a welding set. That wouldn't qualify for the OLEV grant, but OTOH wouldn't have its price artificially boosted by the people who seem to think that being OLEV approved is a licence to print money. Before we get the usual shrieks of horror, the only bit of uprating required to make it completely safe for EV charging would be to install an extra earthing point (which might add £10 to price of job).

With a 'Commando' socket you could then buy an 'Ohme' charger (£400 from the Ohme website or £200 if you're an Octopus customer) and charge car at up to 7kW (just like a 'proper' wall outlet) and if you don't like the Ohme, all necessary cabling would have been done to enable a cut price installation that would qualify for the OLEV grant.
 
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In order to get OLEV grant you need VIN number at least that is what I was told, I got that 2 weeks after ordering and my charger was installed 4 months before I got the car
This is not the case. You need proof of purchase for an EV, sales invoice or finance documentation is fine.

I would recommend going with a company that does all the paperwork and claims the grant for you. Going down the installer route you will probably have to claim the grant yourself. Loads of hassle.

I don't understand this commando socket For a glorified granny charger. It's the same cost as getting a Pod point tethered charger and they do everything for you claim the grant etc.

It just seems like a messy sub optimal solution at similar or more cost than a proper dedicated charger with more work involved.

Chargers seem to be something people make really hard work of for some reason.
 

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They haven't changed I had a charger installed a few weeks ago no vin required just a sales invoice. Pod point did everything claimed grant etc. I wasn't asked for a vin number at any stage

Maybe if you go to the route of finding your own installer and claiming the grant yourself ?
 

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I would recommend going with a company that does all the paperwork and claims the grant for you. Going down the installer route you will probably have to claim the grant yourself. Loads of hassle.
I don't think you can claim the OLEV grant yourself - unless of course you're an OLEV registered installer, in which case you wouldn't need advice from this website.

But, many OLEV registered installers appear to be inflating the cost of the job so that they make a profit on the job and keep all the grant for extra profit !

I don't understand this commando socket For a glorified granny charger. It's the same cost as getting a Pod point tethered charger and they do everything for you claim the grant etc.
It's simply a case of getting a local tradesman who isn't an OLEV registered installer so doesn't have the same overheads as one of them to do the electrical wiring at a much cheaper price

To describe an Ohme unit as "a glorified granny charger" clearly demonstrates lack of understanding of it ! It does in fact meet all the same safety standards as a tethered charger (though may require a low cost additional earthing point if fitted outdoors) and offers the additional bonus of being very easy to disconnect and store elsewhere if you're worried about it being stolen or used by unauthorised 'visitors'. If you really wanted to, you could have a fixed version of the Ohme fitted by an OLEV registered installer who would then be able to claim the grant. However, I strongly suspect that route would result in a higher nett cost than the commando route.

FWIW, my (Rolec) charger was fitted by an OLEV registered installer but that was back in the day when the grant was worth claiming and before installers had cottoned on to the concept of inflating prices to keep the grant as a bonus.
 
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