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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I’m in the early stages of choosing a new vehicle and am really keen to get into EV life.
I’ve been looking at either the Corsa-e or the Peugeot e-208 and was wondering if anyone has any pros or cons of either vehicle?
Also what are the fundamental differences between 7.4kwch and 11kwch?
Finally, any tips or advice for a potential EV newbie?

thanks in advance
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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The 11kwh charger will charge about 50% faster, but only at 7kw on a home charger.
On the public AC chargers which are 22kw (Fast) or 43kw (Rapid/Quick) you will still only charge at your vehicles charger rate, so always best to op for the faster built-in charger.

Many supermarkets have free 7kw chargers for customers to top up whilst shopping, otherwise these are usually regarded as 'destination' chargers where , for example, you can charge up overnight or at a Park & Ride, hotel etc.

Sorry I can't comment on your choice as I've not driven either but I suggest posting your intended use. E.G daily journey miles, any regular long journeys, will you be able to charger at home and/or work?
 

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MG5
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Hi everyone,
I’m in the early stages of choosing a new vehicle and am really keen to get into EV life.
I’ve been looking at either the Corsa-e or the Peugeot e-208 and was wondering if anyone has any pros or cons of either vehicle?
Also what are the fundamental differences between 7.4kwch and 11kwch?
Finally, any tips or advice for a potential EV newbie?

thanks in advance
Hi, I was looking at a small EV just to use commuting but when I took the MG5 out for a test drive I was hooked with a great price, space, and range ( even more on the LR).
Advice. Get a smart meter now so you are ready to get a smart tariff like Octopus Go at 5p/kWh for four hours over night.
Always carry your 'granny charger' and a type 2 cable.
Get ready to have a page of apps for charging points and locators. Zap-Map is a must.
Have fun☺
 

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I would also consider the Kia Soul at this price point.

Much bigger range, 11kw charger as standard and better equipped. Now under £30k with discounts.

If you are looking a tiny lease, the corsa is a lot cheaper, otherwise the Kia is a bit more money for a much better car, with a much longer range (I have done 312m in mine on 1 charge,)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi, I was looking at a small EV just to use commuting but when I took the MG5 out for a test drive I was hooked with a great price, space, and range ( even more on the LR).
Advice. Get a smart meter now so you are ready to get a smart tariff like Octopus Go at 5p/kWh for four hours over night.
Always carry your 'granny charger' and a type 2 cable.
Get ready to have a page of apps for charging points and locators. Zap-Map is a must.
Have fun☺
Thanks! I hadn’t even heard of the MG5 until I joined this forum so it’s great to have other perspectives.
We already have a smart meter installed and I learnt last night that my energy provider has just introduced an EV friendly tariff too!

The 11kwh charger will charge about 50% faster, but only at 7kw on a home charger.
On the public AC chargers which are 22kw (Fast) or 43kw (Rapid/Quick) you will still only charge at your vehicles charger rate, so always best to op for the faster built-in charger.

Many supermarkets have free 7kw chargers for customers to top up whilst shopping, otherwise these are usually regarded as 'destination' chargers where , for example, you can charge up overnight or at a Park & Ride, hotel etc.

Sorry I can't comment on your choice as I've not driven either but I suggest posting your intended use. E.G daily journey miles, any regular long journeys, will you be able to charger at home and/or work?
So basically I should go with the 11kwh charger? Will I encounter any issues with this charger?
I drive to work 3-4 times a week and it’s a 45-50 mile round trip including motorway. The only other longer journey I would consider “regular” is my parents 32 miles away. Then we make infrequent long journeys when taking holidays here in the UK. I’ve downloaded zap-app already to test out the route planner etc and seem to get on with it fairly well.

I am hoping to be able to charge at home, that will probably be the deciding factor. Charging at work is possible but a little more difficult as I’ve learnt from colleagues that the charger has a 4 hour limit and then starts to charge you the earth for “overstaying”. I’m a nurse in a busy A&E so popping out four hours into my shift to move the car isn’t really an option.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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Thanks! I hadn’t even heard of the MG5 until I joined this forum so it’s great to have other perspectives.
We already have a smart meter installed and I learnt last night that my energy provider has just introduced an EV friendly tariff too!



So basically I should go with the 11kwh charger? Will I encounter any issues with this charger?
I drive to work 3-4 times a week and it’s a 45-50 mile round trip including motorway. The only other longer journey I would consider “regular” is my parents 32 miles away. Then we make infrequent long journeys when taking holidays here in the UK. I’ve downloaded zap-app already to test out the route planner etc and seem to get on with it fairly well.

I am hoping to be able to charge at home, that will probably be the deciding factor. Charging at work is possible but a little more difficult as I’ve learnt from colleagues that the charger has a 4 hour limit and then starts to charge you the earth for “overstaying”. I’m a nurse in a busy A&E so popping out four hours into my shift to move the car isn’t really an option.
With those journeys, the granny charger that should be supplied will be adequate to keep you topped up overnight and avoid the need to have a 7kw charger installed. You might need to have an outdoor 13a socket fitted for it depending on what sockets are within about 5m of the car's charging port.
 

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As has been said all over this forum - a granny charger should NEVER be used as the regular form of charging an electric car - it is for irregular emergency use only. It is safer if you can drop to 6A charge rate but still not safe long term.

See here for just ONE of many many examples of why

There are literally hundreds of cases the same on this forum alone - I have had it happen to me as well, it’s not myth or fokelore - it happens.

Put simply, a 3 pin plug was never designed to take that much power for that long continuously.

If cost an issue, get a commando socket installed as a bare minimum
 

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Both of your proposed choices (Corsa-e and Peugeot e-208) have 100kW DC rapid charging using the CCS connector. This is what you will use "on the road", but with around 200 miles range when fully charged you'll only need this for longer journeys.

At home you will use your 7kW AC wall charge point, using the Type 2 connector (which is part of the CCS socket on the car). So I don't see much point in going for anything over 7kW AC.

You will need the Zap-Map app for away-from-home journey planning to see where the rapid chargers are (motorway service areas for example). There is also a web-based version to run on your PC (which I tend to use for planning).

Best to do your own research - there is loads of information out there.

PS: My Leaf came with both cables: Type 2 for a quick top-up away from home at supermarkets, for example and the Granny 13A domestic socket charger. In over 3 years I have NEVER used the Granny charger, and only rarely used the Type 2 cable (mainly in a car park where it was free to use and offset the car parking charge :))

I also have a tethered (Type 2 cable permanently connected to charge point) 7kW PodPoint for home charging.
 

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My wife went through this process earlier this year, and her favourite was the Peugeot e-208, she felt it had the edge over the Corsa-e. We went and looked at both, then she spotted the Renault Zoe, and changed her mind and bought that instead. Mainly it came down to her personal preferences and the look and interior of the Zoe, but it's much faster AC charging has also turned out to be an unexpected benefit. On her last long trip she had planned to charge at a CCS rapid, but it was in use. Didn't much matter though, as the Zoe has a 22 kW AC charger, so she just used the AC cable on the charge point that wasn't being used.

My advice would be to look at several different models and see which best suits your needs. There isn't much to choose between any of them in this price range, they are all good cars, with a reasonable range and few known faults. It may just come down to the look of the car as much as anything else. In my wife's case she really liked the flame red colour the Zoe is available in, and I strongly suspect that counted for as much as anything else! She picked up her new Zoe at the end of March and is still very pleased with it.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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As has been said all over this forum - a granny charger should NEVER be used as the regular form of charging an electric car - it is for irregular emergency use only. It is safer if you can drop to 6A charge rate but still not safe long term.

See here for just ONE of many many examples of why

There are literally hundreds of cases the same on this forum alone - I have had it happen to me as well, it’s not myth or fokelore - it happens.

Put simply, a 3 pin plug was never designed to take that much power for that long continuously.

If cost an issue, get a commando socket installed as a bare minimum
Go by the vehicle handbook. If it states not to use the granny charger except in an emergency, then don't.

Otherwise follow the guidance in the handbook regarding monitoring the socket for overheating.

One socket in my porch does get slightly warm after several hours, the other does not so not dangerous to use.
I have also fitted a smoke alarm on the wall above the socket as a 'peace of mind' warning when charging overnight.
 

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I’m a nurse in a busy A&E so popping out four hours into my shift to move the car isn’t really an option.
Certain car manufacturers offer discounts to those working in the NHS. I've certainly seen MG EVs offered for a reasonable discount under this 'Blue Light' scheme. It would be worth mentioning this when enquiring.

Kind regards
- Garry

P.S. Thank you.
 

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As a Corsa-e owner for a year now, I would advise you to ignore the need to get an 11kW version. Unless you have a 3 phase electricity supply at home (which the vast majority of people don't, here in the UK) and you have access to 11kW or greater chargers at work, you'll be paying extra for something that you would hardly ever use. The standard 7kW charger is fine.

With your type of commuting, you'd only need to charge up after every 3 round trips. I used a granny charger for about 6 weeks before my 7Kw EVSE was installed. Never had a problem with it. Yes, the plug would get slightly warm after an all-night charge but never worryingly so. Just remember that the rate that you can put miles back into your battery is what matters.

With a granny charger, you'll put about 6 miles range back into the battery every hour that you charge. With a 7kW type 2 charger (at home or at a car park) you'll recharge at around 21 miles every hour of charging. If you use a rapid charger you'll put anything from 150 to 300 miles in an hour of charging. (depends on the state of charge of the battery and the power of the charger but the Corsa and the Peugeot will charge at up to 100kW.

So, for example, If you've commuted 3 times and driven ~150 miles from a fully charged battery, you'll have approximately 20%-25% battery charge left. If you were to plug in with a granny charger at home for say 10 hours, you could put back in 60 miles. If you had a 7kW EVSE at home, you'd fully charge the car back to 100% in that time. If you were to stop at a 50kW rapid charger with 20% battery charge, you'd get back to just over 80% (or ~ 160 miles of range) in 35 minutes. If you used a 100kW or greater rapid charger, you would get to 80% charge in less than 25 minutes.

So, based on what you described as your typical weekly driving pattern, you'd be fine with just a granny charger if you plugged in every night. However, better to have the 7kW fast-charging capability at home and you'd only need to top up maybe 2 or 3 times a week. If you have a smart meter and use something like Octopus Go or Go Faster tariff, you could charge up at an off-peak rate for only 5p/kWh which in the Corsa-e or e-208 would give you less than 1.5p/mile cost of "fuel". Work out how much you pay a week in fuel at the moment for your ~200 miles/week. With a Corsa-e or e-208, you'd spend just £3 a week in "fuel".
 

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So basically I should go with the 11kwh charger? Will I encounter any issues with this charger?
I wouldn't use that as the sole reason for deciding which car to get.
As several others have already said, when charging at home, 11kW charger will not give you 11kW unless your home has a 3 phase electricity supply. That's very rare in the UK but more common on the European mainland. You'll get 7kW at home.
Away from home, you're likely to want a rapid charger which has nothing to do with the 7kW/11kW choice.
 

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11kw doesn't matter if you charge at home. CCS charging on both is good and quick. The Corsa is often discounted. There was a lease offer with them at £175 a month so I'd avoid paying anything like the list price. Sub £25k is where you need to aim really.

Drive both and see which you prefer. If you do a lot of night driving then the Matrix LED headlights are a real benefit.

Other daft annoyance is that you can't pre condition either of them below 50% battery so I found that kept the battery state of charge higher than I wanted more of the time.
 

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I'd reiterate what has been said above. The 11Kw charger is a nice to have, not must have. Had my car since Dec, done coming up for 8000 miles. These have included 300 mile trips in winter needing to splash and fash to get home. Never found a need for 11Kw charger on my niro 4+.
In my opinion you will be good with just about any EV. If you do a lot of long journeys, then look at the charge time from 10% to 80%. The rest is all about your comfort likes. For me the cooled Seats were the USP along with the large boot.
My advice is lots of test drives and see what feels right.
 
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With regard to having an 11 kW charger in the car, I'd also say that I don't think it's really that useful. My last three cars have all been capable of charging at 11 kW, but I have never once used it, 99% of charging has been at 7 kW charge points, mostly at home but quite often destination charge points at hotels and self-catering places. I would say that having a 22 kW charger in the car does make a difference though. That charges fast enough to consider using it for on-route charging on a trip. An hour stopped having a break, maybe lunch, on a 22 kW charge point may well add around 80 to 100 miles, so pretty useful.
 

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Travelling around the island of Ireland there are lots of 22kW three phase chargers and very few rapids. In these circumstances having a three phase 11kW charger is beneficial, it makes quite the difference when out and about. Outside that example it's absolutely not worth paying extra for. The Zoe has 22kW AC charging as standard, which can be really useful, but mostly I charge it at home so..... 7kW. Zoe is definitely worth a look. It will go further than the Stelantis cars and is a really nice drive (I haven't tried the 208 or the Corsa). I think renault are still offering 0% PCP deals which does affect the sums quite a bit. I'd also advocate checking out the Soul. The battery and drivetrain are a cut above what's in the 208 and the corsa.
 

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Go by the vehicle handbook. If it states not to use the granny charger except in an emergency, then don't.

Otherwise follow the guidance in the handbook regarding monitoring the socket for overheating.

One socket in my porch does get slightly warm after several hours, the other does not so not dangerous to use.
I have also fitted a smoke alarm on the wall above the socket as a 'peace of mind' warning when charging overnight.
So, the owners manual knows the quality and condition of the socket you plug into does it - course it doesn’t.

Granny chargers are absolutely fine, until the day they aren’t.

I used the same socket at work for 8 months with no issues at all, until one day, checking my app, I noticed the car wasn’t charging, I popped out to check it to find smoke pouring out the socket!

Once I finally managed to remove the plug from the socket (it had welded itself in a bit) the socket had basically melted, and couldn’t have been more than a few minutes away from being on fire.

So I don’t care what the manual says - 3 pin, 13A sockets are not designed to take 10A for 10+ hours day in day out - as I say, it will be fine for months, you will feel happy and secure, and then one day it could melt - and if you are asleep in your bed, it could start a house fire - all to save £200 - stupid.

If you have an EV, charge it off a proper charger, if you don’t have one, get one or charge it somewhere that does.

See


Seriously, there is enough info just on this site - we should not be advocating using a granny charger as a main charging solution.
 

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So, the owners manual knows the quality and condition of the socket you plug into does it - course it doesn’t.

Granny chargers are absolutely fine, until the day they aren’t.

I used the same socket at work for 8 months with no issues at all, until one day, checking my app, I noticed the car wasn’t charging, I popped out to check it to find smoke pouring out the socket!

Once I finally managed to remove the plug from the socket (it had welded itself in a bit) the socket had basically melted, and couldn’t have been more than a few minutes away from being on fire.

So I don’t care what the manual says - 3 pin, 13A sockets are not designed to take 10A for 10+ hours day in day out - as I say, it will be fine for months, you will feel happy and secure, and then one day it could melt - and if you are asleep in your bed, it could start a house fire - all to save £200 - stupid.

If you have an EV, charge it off a proper charger, if you don’t have one, get one or charge it somewhere that does.

See


Seriously, there is enough info just on this site - we should not be advocating using a granny charger as a main charging solution.
Well said.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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So, the owners manual knows the quality and condition of the socket you plug into does it - course it doesn’t.

Granny chargers are absolutely fine, until the day they aren’t.

I used the same socket at work for 8 months with no issues at all, until one day, checking my app, I noticed the car wasn’t charging, I popped out to check it to find smoke pouring out the socket!

Once I finally managed to remove the plug from the socket (it had welded itself in a bit) the socket had basically melted, and couldn’t have been more than a few minutes away from being on fire.

So I don’t care what the manual says - 3 pin, 13A sockets are not designed to take 10A for 10+ hours day in day out - as I say, it will be fine for months, you will feel happy and secure, and then one day it could melt - and if you are asleep in your bed, it could start a house fire - all to save £200 - stupid.

If you have an EV, charge it off a proper charger, if you don’t have one, get one or charge it somewhere that does.

See


Seriously, there is enough info just on this site - we should not be advocating using a granny charger as a main charging solution.
Only the tiny percentage that have had issues post on forums and of those, some will never have monitored the socket in the first place.

Its not for anyone on here to tell others what to do, it's for us each to make our own decision, and also consider what the handbook and the supplying dealer says.
 
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