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hi
I bought phev 5hs 2017 millage- 34000
I charged battery full but its show me 13mil only on electric instead of 28 mil
any advice? what I can do ?
 

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Design 2.4
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Because of the time of the year I am using my heater at 22 degrees more often, this time of year my guess-o-meter shows 28-29miles if I switch the heater off, in reality using B5 I achieve about 27miles

If I switch the heater on from the word go it drops to 20miles, I achieve around 20 miles using B5.

I just use the charge mode to extend my range and keep warm.
 

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Plus preheating the car from the mains (as much as possible!) before you set off means that the heating requirement is much lower and the range is improved.

I seldom see below 16 miles on our 70k 2015 model.
 

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Plus preheating the car from the mains (as much as possible!) before you set off means that the heating requirement is much lower and the range is improved.

I seldom see below 16 miles on our 70k 2015 model.
I am struggling to understand the manual how to preheat using the mains, I have tried to follow the manual but the timer uses my PHEV battery to preheat.

My PHEV is plugged into my PodPoint EV charger, the PHEV charger timer is set to 00.30 - 04.30 am. I plug the PHEV into the charger set the heating timer leave the heater in the ON position, press the button on the key fob to temporarily disarm the timer charger, heater works but uses my PHEV battery.

Do I have to physically switch off my charger timer for the heater to work using electric ?
 

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You have set it only to charge during those hours, so it won't charge outside those hours when the heater starts.

It's not that simple though. If the PHEV is fully charged when the heater kicks in, mine will not restart charging even though the SOH is dropping. So I've had to rejig my charge timer so that either (a) it is still charging when the heater kicks in or (b) it is fully charged already and starts to charge at the same time as the heater. The heater will take more power initially (4kW) even than a Type 1 cable can supply, but the power will drop as the car warms. I set it to finish heating 5-10 minutes before I need to leave, so that the charger can fill the battery a bit. But it's a trade-off between refilling the battery and the car cooling down.

There are loads of tips on this and loads of other things in Richi's FAQ here:
 
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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Design 2.4
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You have set it only to charge during those hours, so it won't charge outside those hours when the heater starts.

It's not that simple though. If the PHEV is fully charged when the heater kicks in, mine will not restart charging even though the SOH is dropping. So I've had to rejig my charge timer so that either (a) it is still charging when the heater kicks in or (b) it is fully charged already and starts to charge at the same time as the heater. The heater will take more power initially (4kW) even than a Type 1 cable can supply, but the power will drop as the car warms. I set it to finish heating 5-10 minutes before I need to leave, so that the charger can fill the battery a bit. But it's a trade-off between refilling the battery and the car cooling down.

There are loads of tips on this and loads of other things in Richi's FAQ here:
Ok I will reset my charge timer to 00.30 - 10.00 to enable the heater to work on the mains:)
 

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Ok I will reset my charge timer to 00.30 - 10.00 to enable the heater to work on the mains:)
As I said, it's not that simple, at least on my 2015 pre-facelift model. If the charge starts at 00:30 and finishes a 04:00 (say), it won't start charging again if the heating comes on at 07:00. It seems to 'sleep' once the charging is finished so the 07:00 heating will come off the battery. The PHEV only allows one charge timer per day, so I'm not sure there is a way to get 4 hours cheap charging in the middle of the night and heating off the charger in the morning. Has anyone managed to do it?
 

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As I said, it's not that simple, at least on my 2015 pre-facelift model. If the charge starts at 00:30 and finishes a 04:00 (say), it won't start charging again if the heating comes on at 07:00. It seems to 'sleep' once the charging is finished so the 07:00 heating will come off the battery. The PHEV only allows one charge timer per day, so I'm not sure there is a way to get 4 hours cheap charging in the middle of the night and heating off the charger in the morning. Has anyone managed to do it?
Ok, my model has I think about 5 different timed settings up to 10 - 20 minutes at a time, not that I have tried them. As we only travel short journeys it is not a real problem.
 

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It would make sense that they've upgraded it to allow you set more than one timer a day in newer models, as it's a bit of a PITA in our's. We can program 3 sets of on/off times for heating and charging, but it only allows you to have a single set active a day
 

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It got 5 charge setting and 5 heater setting, however deleted the heated windscreen on 2020 models shame.

This morning I switched off the charge timer and set the heater for 20 minutes it worked, for the first time due to minus temperatures the ICE started up because the heater was left in the on position.
 

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I achieve around 20 miles using B5.
B5 converts a lot of kinetic energy into electricity, which you then convert back into kinetic energy, and each conversion loses energy (it is impossible for any conversion to be 100% efficient).

Try B0 and a light foot.
 

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B5 converts a lot of kinetic energy into electricity, which you then convert back into kinetic energy, and each conversion loses energy (it is impossible for any conversion to be 100% efficient).

Try B0 and a light foot.
No it doesn't. It can convert kinetic energy if you release the throttle. If you don't release the throttle, you can coast in B5 if you want. Or you can slow down if you need to by releasing the pedal. B0 simply removes the option to slow down without using the brake
 

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No it doesn't. It can convert kinetic energy if you release the throttle. If you don't release the throttle, you can coast in B5 if you want. Or you can slow down if you need to by releasing the pedal. B0 simply removes the option to slow down without using the brake
Sure, if you balance your foot perfectly and physically emulate the effect of B0, which I hypothesise is unlikely to be accurate for an extended period of time.

Braking in B0 also uses regenerative brakes before engaging non-regenerative brakes, so really all B5 does it make it harder to coast/drive efficiently. My view is that B numbers are a safety feature: B2 emulates typical ICE engine braking, and the high B values emulate ICE engine braking with low gears. There is a risk that a driver accustomed to driving an ICE would be dangerously surprised by the pure inertia of B0.

Personally, I find B5 useful for spreading the braking 'effort' between fingers and toes, and then I revert to B0 - maybe I am extra lazy?
 
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