Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone attempted to use a burst mode mains power controller to regulate the charge rate through a granny cable (ie Mennekes 16A mode 2)?
Would the charge controller get the hump is some of the mains cycles were missing?

By using a low voltage pulse width modulated signal switching a chunky solid state relay, it's possible to control the overall power supplied to a resistive load.
Most solar diverters use this method to syphon off excess PV power.

Comments and feedback welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,642 Posts
Has anyone attempted to use a burst mode mains power controller to regulate the charge rate through a granny cable (ie Mennekes 16A mode 2)?
Would the charge controller get the hump is some of the mains cycles were missing?

By using a low voltage pulse width modulated signal switching a chunky solid state relay, it's possible to control the overall power supplied to a resistive load.
Most solar diverters use this method to syphon off excess PV power.

Comments and feedback welcome.
This is a daft idea.

The AC charging protocol used by all commercially sold EVs in Europe/UK already has a method to control charging rate. Just build yourself an EVSE using an Arduino, kit of parts or a Viridian protocol controller.

regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,498 Posts
This idea will absolutely not work. Under no circumstances plug any form of EVSE into this kind of supply, every chance you'll break something/cause the PCD to fry/whatever. And a broken EVSE can damage your car, expensively. I have the £1300 bill to prove it.

The current is regulated by the car. Period. All the EVSE does is to tell the car the maximum current it's allowed to take. That's it. Up to the car to obey this "advice", and they all do seem to! You cannot limit the power taken by the car by throttling the mains supply. Don't even dream of doing this!

The EVSE will "offer" 0A, or anything between 6A and the maximum it knows itself, which might be limited by the cable from EVSE to car, might be limited by solar-aware logic etc, might be limited by domestic supply to 16A or 32A typically (though any value >=6, <=80A can be set in principle).
 

·
Registered
Nissan LEAF30
Joined
·
11,027 Posts
As above, don't risk it as the on-board charger on the car is likely to get upset, probably expensively. @HandyAndy 's suggestion is the better way to achieve the same thing via a safer Mode 3 device although beware of the lower limit of 6 Amps (~1.4kW unless you get a 110v unit from the USA or 100v from Japan and run your PV at that level also). Note that the efficiency of the on-board chargers often drops off a cliff at low levels so you may not achieve what you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,498 Posts
... Note that the efficiency of the on-board chargers often drops off a cliff at low levels so you may not achieve what you want.
This is car-dependent. I've charged my ID.3 at 6A on 240V at a very high efficiency of 90%, the same as I get at 32A. But Zoes have a reputation for not liking low amps charging, and they have a patented system that's very different to most other EVs I gather.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top