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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone happen to know or have experience of wading floodwater in an id.3? Last weekend I got caught in torrential rain and flooding and managed to avoid floodwater that had killed a BMW 6 series by driving on the pavement.

But I wonder if, not having a tail pipe, if the batteries are fully sealed, maybe an ev could wade deeper than a comparable ice?
 

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Volkswagen ID.3 Life
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The guidance is the same for an ICE vehicle; no deeper than the centre of the wheels. However, in theory an EV should be less likely to cut out, but I wouldn't trust the seals on the doors not to let water in.
 

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I know hydrolock etc. There was a guy with a Zoe on here that had been for a Wade and it destroyed the battery.....
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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The Zoe has air cooling for the battery, which is a route in for the water, I think that flooded Zoe had water in the cooling ducts. In theory with the liquid cooled packs in other cars you don’t have that risk, there’ll be another one though. They’re not designed to go underwater.
 

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I think the risk is more from water getting past the door seals or floating downstream more than it upsetting the battery.

I've personally been through about 8 or 9 inches (slowly) in the local ford with zero side effect.
 

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Puma GTE > Suzuki Jimny > BMW Z4 > Cupra Leon ST
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I think the risk is more from water getting past the door seals or floating downstream more than it upsetting the battery.

I've personally been through about 8 or 9 inches (slowly) in the local ford with zero side effect.
While everything important is mostly sealed, the seal is not perfect and you can damage other components that may not stop the car immediately but that with the water will degrade later on
I think it really depends on how long the car will stay under water...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The water must be no higher than the lower edge of the vehicle body...that's bang on 9 inches on the id.3.

The trouble with wading through floodwater is that the depth increases as you approach the lowest point. Which of course is uknown to you looking from the edge. I think that's what did for the beemer abandoned in the middle of the junction.

9" isn't a lot...using the kerbs to guess the depth might be safe if we assume that above the kerb is don't risk it.
 

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Renault Zoe 50
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The only way to know the depth for use is to wade in and test it yourself, or wait for some other car to go through.

Otherwise, best to find another route.
 

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ID.4 First Edition
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As someone who got stuck halfway through crossing a flooded junction in an ICE car I'd feel much more confident doing it in an electric car. No intake to get flooded etc. Check out this video of an old skool Leaf easily getting through a deep test trench:


Or this one of a Model X doing the same in the real world:


Unless VW have really dropped the ball with their water proofing I'd expect the IDs to perform similarly. I'd guess that the dire warnings in the manual are more to cover their backs against lawsuits than there being any real risk of electrical failure.
 

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As someone who got stuck halfway through crossing a flooded junction in an ICE car I'd feel much more confident doing it in an electric car. No intake to get flooded etc. Check out this video of an old skool Leaf easily getting through a deep test trench:


Or this one of a Model X doing the same in the real world:


Unless VW have really dropped the ball with their water proofing I'd expect the IDs to perform similarly. I'd guess that the dire warnings in the manual are more to cover their backs against lawsuits than there being any real risk of electrical failure.
Why tempt fate? Door seals are to keep wind and rain out, not half a ton of water pushing against them.

It's like risking a "splash proof" watch by taking it swimming.
 

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As someone who got stuck halfway through crossing a flooded junction in an ICE car I'd feel much more confident doing it in an electric car. No intake to get flooded etc. Check out this video of an old skool Leaf easily getting through a deep test trench:


Or this one of a Model X doing the same in the real world:


Unless VW have really dropped the ball with their water proofing I'd expect the IDs to perform similarly. I'd guess that the dire warnings in the manual are more to cover their backs against lawsuits than there being any real risk of electrical failure.
No proof from that video that the Tesla driver didn't have a padding pool in their car after that. I'd say it's far riskier on a Tesla, given their variable build quality -especially poorly hung doors that might not have a good seal all around. Pretty much all cars have an opening up and behind the brake pedal and into the engine bay - if water goes higher than the opening, you're going to get wet feet.
 
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