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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At The Peterborough services today I waited for an Outlander to finish so I could charge. It duly stopped at 80% which was a relief, so I unplugged it and started charging. I then hang around to offer the charger back if required when the driver returned. The Guy was cool with me unplugging although a little nonplussed as it was his first Rapid charge. I mentioned it had stopped at 80% and he replied that is all it ever does. I asked about the 30 mile range and he said thats rubbish some days he only gets 10 and after that it does 30 mpg. In his opinion the only good things about it are the low tax on benefit in Kind and it has all the goodies. As he does 200 miles per day it clearly is not the ideal vehicle for him. Made me feel good in my decision not to purchase one. I suppose 30 mpg on petrol may be quite good for the class of vehicle. Charging to 100% at home would be a small help. I do think this vehicle qualifying for low emissions tax is questionable.
 

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Doing 200 miles/day IMO he would be better off getting an ICE SUV with good mpg like the Qashqai... 50-60mpg and no charging delays.

Horses for courses :) EVs and PHEVs don't work for everyone.
 

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Indeed it looks like someone didn't do their homework.
 
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Made me feel good in my decision not to purchase one. I suppose 30 mpg on petrol may be quite good for the class of vehicle. Charging to 100% at home would be a small help. I do think this vehicle qualifying for low emissions tax is questionable.
I share your concern about some PHEVs exploiting tax loopholes, but I find the Porsche Panamera and Cayenne E-Hybrids more offensive, benefitting from the £5k plug-in car grant, low BIK and congestion charging 100% discount.

30 mpg isn't disastrous for a big heavy car like the Outlander but it's not as good as it would be running on diesel. I'm not sure whether the 200 miles per day owner is better off with his PHEV – he's certainly going to lose a lot of time in petrol stations. :)
 

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Nissan LEAF N-Connecta 40kWh; Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV
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Mitsubishi themselves acknowledge that for journeys over 109 miles their diesel version is more economical in terms of fuel use...artificial tax breaks being counter-productive to environmental concerns?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I share your concern about some PHEVs exploiting tax loopholes, but I find the Porsche Panamera and Cayenne E-Hybrids more offensive, benefitting from the £5k plug-in car grant, low BIK and congestion charging 100% discount.

30 mpg isn't disastrous for a big heavy car like the Outlander but it's not as good as it would be running on diesel. I'm not sure whether the 200 miles per day owner is better off with his PHEV – he's certainly going to lose a lot of time in petrol stations. :)
The 5k grant requires a good range if I am not mistaken. I am not sure how these vehicles qualify?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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I asked about the 30 mile range and he said thats rubbish some days he only gets 10 and after that it does 30 mpg.
Wow. That guy must have a seriously heavy foot. I got 21 miles today on electric in filthy weather over hilly terrain and I got 33+mpg on a previous long distance trip hauling a glider trailer over the Pennines.
 

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In over three months my average was 158mpg in the Outlander so it is certainly capable of low emissions. Even on petrol only 40mpg was a typical figure.
It is a flexible car which puts full environmental responsibility in the hands of the user which in my opinion is to be commended.
Mitsubishi have done a great job with this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow. That guy must have a seriously heavy foot. I got 21 miles today on electric in filthy weather over hilly terrain and I got 33+mpg on a previous long distance trip hauling a glider trailer over the Pennines.
Wow Eugene I am seriously impressed with your vehicle list. Nice to hear a more positive report. Towing a glider, now that takes me back. Will I be allowed to fly again with my Heart condition? I remember the nurse saying don't worry you will still be able to fly, I got all excited and she then said "I didn't mean as a pilot". Too busy trying to earn a living at present.
 

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How can we move our culture away from the need for 200 mile a day, 50,000 mile a year jobs?

We managed it 40 years ago with little difficulty and the Internet was supposed to empower easier/greener working but I see no evidence.

Are such jobs really necessary or are they just a hangover of woolly thinking that will soon vanish?
 

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How can we move our culture away from the need for 200 mile a day, 50,000 mile a year jobs?

We managed it 40 years ago with little difficulty and the Internet was supposed to empower easier/greener working but I see no evidence.

Are such jobs really necessary or are they just a hangover of woolly thinking that will soon vanish?

The world is now full of people who specialise in doing very spacific jobs, this means a limited number of people will ever be trained to do them.
100 years ago the villages we live in would of had the majority of its inhabitants working the land and other conected jobs, so having no commutes. Those same jobs are now done by huge machines and the people are no longer needed.

I for instance specialise in the refurb and building of commercial interiors, if I did not travel to work and only worked locally I would have to move house every couple of years as I would run out of local buildings to work on.

In 2006 I was involved in the installation of the new passport offices. There were a few firms that started the project, but as it was so complicated and every office had to be the same most of them pulled out. That left me doing something like 45 office out of about 70 the highest being John O'Groats the lowest being St Austell. Sometimes you have to go where the work is, thats just a fact of modern life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How can we move our culture away from the need for 200 mile a day, 50,000 mile a year jobs?

We managed it 40 years ago with little difficulty and the Internet was supposed to empower easier/greener working but I see no evidence.

Are such jobs really necessary or are they just a hangover of woolly thinking that will soon vanish?
I agree with Ian, my experience of mobile work is that firms do not bother to organise work so that mileage is minimised. When the charge points are fitted it is usually someone who has come from miles away. When two people in our village had fiber optic broadband fitted on the same day, same supplier, they sent two different guys, how mad is that. When I was sent a weeks work in advance I could see opportunities for saving distance by changing a few appointments, the firm did not like that so started only sending one day at a time.
 

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Yes AndyG, I understand the forces that have made the change to our society and have been subject to them myself. There will always be someone whose work forces them to do silly distances.

My question was how may we change them, I don't think it can go on too much longer and it does not seem to happen so much in other countries, but statistics are hard to find.

One factor is that many people profit from having company cars (the cost of running the car is less than they are paid via car expenses) and the cost of that transport is absorbed into the cost of the product, effectively invisible, so no real incentive for the driver or company to cut journeys or distances.

Perhaps the whole company car thing needs reviewing at governmental level to reduce the 'value' of the 'perk' so it is of zero or even slightly negative to the employee's pocket.
 

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Yes AndyG, I understand the forces that have made the change to our society and have been subject to them myself. There will always be someone whose work forces them to do silly distances.

My question was how may we change them, I don't think it can go on too much longer and it does not seem to happen so much in other countries, but statistics are hard to find.

One factor is that many people profit from having company cars (the cost of running the car is less than they are paid via car expenses) and the cost of that transport is absorbed into the cost of the product, effectively invisible, so no real incentive for the driver or company to cut journeys or distances.

Perhaps the whole company car thing needs reviewing at governmental level to reduce the 'value' of the 'perk' so it is of zero or even slightly negative to the employee's pocket.
My last company car was costing me £110 a month, that was a low emissions diesel.
If I had not gotten the choice of car it would have been a lot higher. That cost to me was to enable me to travel for work, so not much of a 'Perk' unless you use it for plenty of personal travel. Especially if you are on the road constantly, so not actually using it for commuting to a regular place of work.

That's one reason many companies pay you a car allowance, rather than supplying a car. As far as the tax man is concerned it is just a pay rise, and you then get to claim back some of the mileage costs for fuel. You might make a bit, but not a lot on top of the costs, certainly in the long run.
 

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As a woman I am also managing to charge at home, still slowly see other rant about Pod Point, and having done my homework, managing most of my daily journeys on electric power only with careful driving and no tail gating. I haven't filled up for over three weeks, despite driving over 30 miles distance on numerous occasions and two long drives. I therefor do feel the reduced tax should apply.
 
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