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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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The power of the LEAF+ is 160Kw (215hp) which makes the driving experience very refined comparable with the Polestar2 Standard Range in the power stakes. (which costs £40K)

The power of the MG5 is 115Kw (154hp) which makes it a good work horse but lacks the refinement of the LEAF+

To me it's a straight choice, MG5 - competent workhorse - Versus the LEAF + Refined EV.
I've done six, 250mile each way trips to Argyll in the last few months and the Leaf is so smooth, effortless, comfortable and quiet (no whine from the motor or transmission), with superb overtaking ability.
It feels like a quality motor.
 

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NISSAN LEAF 62Kwh
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The MG has active thermal management for the battery. It's liquid cooled, so no Rapidgate.
The LEAF+ doesn't need battery thermal management for journey's less than 300 miles in 1 day - over that range, then Rapidgate is a problem. Usually, with the LEAF+, it's the 2nd Rapid Charge of the day that heats the battery up, other than that the battery with no active cooling manages the internal heat reasonably well.

It's worth mentioning that in some cases active cooling of the battery is inefficient in that some areas of the battery are cooled while other areas of the battery is left with hot spots that can degrade at a faster rate.

Also if there is no active cooling, then less drain on the vehicle efficiency and going forward less to go wrong so cheaper running costs when out of warranty.

Basically in other country's with hot temperatures and daily journey's over 300 miles, then the LEAF with no active battery cooling is not suitable. But for the UK and for the average user the LEAF+ is a great buy and Rapidgate will never be an issue.


Came across this recent MUNRO video which strips down the battery thermal management system of the FORD - MACH-E and compared it a TESLA Model Y.

LOL check out the FORD parts count, never seen so many hoses and all that extra weight - I will take the LEAF+ all day every day

This is actually a candidate for a new Monty Python Sketch 😀

Mach-E Thermal System Part 2: A Detailed Comparison to the Model Y


 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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The LEAF+ doesn't need battery thermal management for journey's less than 300 miles in 1 day - over that range, then Rapidgate is a problem. Usually, with the LEAF+, it's the 2nd Rapid Charge of the day that heats the battery up, other than that the battery with no active cooling manages the internal heat reasonably well.

It's worth mentioning that in some cases active cooling of the battery is inefficient in that some areas of the battery are cooled while other areas of the battery is left with hot spots that can degrade at a faster rate.

Also if there is no active cooling, then less drain on the vehicle efficiency and going forward less to go wrong so cheaper running costs when out of warranty.

Basically in other country's with hot temperatures and daily journey's over 300 miles, then the LEAF with no active battery cooling is not suitable. But for the UK and for the average user the LEAF+ is a great buy and Rapidgate will never be an issue.


Came across this recent MUNRO video which strips down the battery thermal management system of the FORD - MACH-E and compared it a TESLA Model Y.

LOL check out the FORD parts count, never seen so many hoses and all that extra weight - I will take the LEAF+ all day every day

This is actually a candidate for a new Monty Python Sketch 😀

Mach-E Thermal System Part 2: A Detailed Comparison to the Model Y


44C* is the warmest I've seen and that was after a 120mile drive and on an Ultra rapid starting at 71kW at 23% and charging to 90%.
* about 3/4 on the temp gauge.
 

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MG ZS EV
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Early days to write the book on MG battery reliability -- their first EV, the ZS EV, went on sale in the UK less than two years ago.

People have had ten years to look at Leafs. It isn't clear exactly how well the experience with the original 24kWh battery will map to the latest 62kWh models. These also went on sale about the same time ago as the first MG EVs. Some owners fuss about the SOH on LeafSpy. I'm not sure anyone has lost a bar yet. (They sold so many, there must be someone, perhaps in Arizona, which is a bad place for passively cooled batteries, but I haven't heard of it myself.)

Kind regards
- Garry
Absolutely right but the original Leafs were showing signs of degradation at 40k miles, that doesn't seem to be the case with the ZS. And the BMS has been changed to drop the voltage range, people charge to full frequently but don't leave them on zero charge for long and so it seems they are really trying to make them very long lived.
 

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... Though the MG has a liquid cooled battery, which I understand is also LFP chemistry. This should lead to less degradation over time compared to the Leaf's air-cooled NCA battery.
The LR version has 61kWh vs 52.5kWh without any significant weight change (18-20kg which is probably largely accounted for by the MG Pilot stuff?) - I wonder if the LR has NMC chemistry like the ZS EV.
 

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I believe that the current MG5 is LFP and the LR will be NMC
"MG5: in China it’s called Roewe Ei5, available with either LFP (Shanghai Jiexin, also battery-swap version) or NMC (SAIC-CATL, 61 kWh"
There is good evidence out there that LFP cells can be very robust indeed and suffer less degradation then NMC with much higher cycle lives. I was surprised that the MG5 user manual makes no mention of avoiding charging to 100% routinely and wonder if this is why.
 

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Ok so made a massive mistake yesterday when we took the Volt into have a service..... My wife sat in the MG5 and I think she may be in love......

Haven't test driven one yet but my main concerns are the lack of delayed charging.
My question are......
Pay a bit more and wait for the LR with pro pilot (which I am 99% certain she wont use)
Buy a top spec LEAF+ which doesn't look massively smaller but will have a better range and the delayed charge
Wait a bit and buy one of the last SR which I am sure will go down in price.....

Although she now mostly works from home she does have times where she has to drive from home in Beds all over the country, including Manchester, Liverpool, Portsmouth, Exeter. The Volt has been great but when out and about she doesn't bother to look for a charger, something that will have to change. She in general doesn't drive for more than 2 hours without stopping.... She is a very keen gardener (she's been on Gardners World with our garden) so the estate would make life easier.....
Back to your original question @AndyG , (because I'm only just catching up) I chose a 62 Leaf over an MG last year because of range, build quality (opinion) and because the MG doesn't do timed charging nor pre-heating. I would agree with all the other positive Leaf comments in this thread about refinement, toys, power, boot space etc too. We now own two 62 Leafs if that helps. I can't comment on the finer details about MG ownership however.
 

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Zoe Devotee
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but once you've had an app to heat or cool the car remotely you soon realise how useful it :)
And when you lose an app (Zoe to ZS) how little you actually miss it and how infrequently you took advantage of the pre-heat/cool. ;) Plus the app has to work, which invariably it won't at least some of the time you want to use it. ;)

"if you can find one over 50kw" comment.
Only the connector is different.
Most of the fast (100kW and over) rapids seem to be CCS only these days?

You could go to:
464l: MG MG5 EV
420l: Nissan Leaf e+
Or go for the MG ZS EV with its smaller boot at 470ltrs. :ROFLMAO:
 

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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To sum up:
If you like the MG, buy it, if you like the Leaf E+, buy it.
Don't make a decision based on what is said on a forum.
Well, exactly. Only a test drive will tell you what you really need to know. Using magazine articles or forum chat to choose a car is not recommended.
 

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Absolutely right but the original Leafs were showing signs of degradation at 40k miles, that doesn't seem to be the case with the ZS. And the BMS has been changed to drop the voltage range, people charge to full frequently but don't leave them on zero charge for long and so it seems they are really trying to make them very long lived.
If nothing else had changed or mattered, you'd expect a 62kWh pack to degrade at 24/62 = 38.7% the rate of a 24kWh pack, as you are sharing the load over more cells. So, the SOH of an 103k mile 62kWh Leaf would be equivalent to that of a 40k mile 24kWh Leaf.

Lots of other things have changed though, and mileage is not the only thing that matters, so who knows what will really happen?

Kind regards
- Garry
 

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And when you lose an app (Zoe to ZS) how little you actually miss it and how infrequently you took advantage of the pre-heat/cool. ;) Plus the app has to work, which invariably it won't at least some of the time you want to use it. ;)



Most of the fast (100kW and over) rapids seem to be CCS only these days?



Or go for the MG ZS EV with its smaller boot at 470ltrs. :ROFLMAO:

True but I rarely had issues using Myleaf/Quickleaf, and the tesla app is pretty good :D

Having a PHEV at the minute as a stop gap with no app access is pants. really pants as i miss the cooling function big time or even checking when the battery is full or going to be full :)
 

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MG ZS EV
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Not sure I trust MG's figures - ZS has 6% top buffer, 3% bottom buffer and apparently 42kWh usable from 44.5kWh.

My tests suggest 40kWh usable is nearer the mark.
I am coming to that conclusion too. Got to zero more quickly than I expected last week on a long trip. Fortunately I was 5 miles from home when it turned —/—!
 
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