Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 20 of 1115 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm purposely starting a new thread as the old one contained completely wrong technical specs. There is also a very negative thread in General EV Discussion.

Great technical summary here: In-Depth: 2017 Countryman Cooper S E Hybrid - MotoringFile

I too was very skeptical when I originally thought the new Countryman was based on the same hybrid setup as the BWM Active Tourer. However, it's quite clever. With ICE powering the front wheels and electric at the rear, you get dynamic 4 wheel drive. Power comes from a 134hp 3-cylinder petrol engine and a 87hp electric motor, giving a peak of 221hp. 3 driving modes:

AUTO eDRIVE – Purely electric driving up to 55 mph , the combustion engine is additionally enabled at higher speeds, in particular when accelerating quickly or when the battery charge falls below seven per cent.

MAX eDRIVE – Purely electric driving up to 78 mph , the combustion engine is additionally enabled at higher speeds or on kickdown.

SAVE BATTERY – The car is powered by the combustion engine, the battery charge state is kept above 90 percent or raised to this level by the starter generator.

I currently have a Golf GTE, and this looks quite attractive to me. I will confess a previous interest in Minis, so I am probably biased. Even I will except the new Countryman isn't the prettiest car in the world.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,811 Posts
I guess there is a market but I would imagine most Mini are only driven short distance so surely a BEV would have been a better solution? BMW tested a BEV model with a few leased in California.

In most countries it will be competing against the Ampera-e and I know what I would prefer :)

Edit: 87 HP in EV mode - yawn :sleep:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
That drive train setup is the same as the 2 Series Active Tourer, the 225XE?

It's basically a detuned version of the BMW i8 setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That drive train setup is the same as the 2 Series Active Tourer, the 225XE?

It's basically a detuned version of the BMW i8 setup.
The BMW 225XE can only do 55mph in electric mode (a deal breaker for me) but the Countryman can do 77mph, so something is different.

The BMW i8 is electric at the front and ICE at the back.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
The BMW 225XE can only do 55mph in electric mode (a deal breaker for me) but the Countryman can do 77mph, so something is different.

The BMW i8 is electric at the front and ICE at the back.
I know you started this thread because the other one contained inaccuracies, but it's incorrect to state that the 225XE can only do 55mph in electric mode, the 225XE also has MAX eDRIVE and can do the same 77mph as the Countryman.

Check the BMW website under MAX eDrive mode;

BMW 2 Series iPerformance Active Tourer : Introduction

You had me checking my sanity, I test drove one a while back and felt sure it was quicker than 55mph in all electric mode.

Also, it is the same concept as the i8, just turned around 180 degrees.

There isn't much new in the world, never mind in BMWs EV range!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
A range of 'up to 24 miles' is woeful. So 15-20 realistic. Unless a plug in has a range of 35 miles (average daily commute) it just seems pointless.
If you only need a car to do 35 miles a day, then just about any BEV from any era will manage that.

PHEVs will cut your petrol usage by about a third on any long journey. I've posted before that my GTE will do at least 30-50 electric miles for every 100-150 driven. 50 electric miles a day doesn't sound so bad does it, and still better than 100% petrol or diesel.

I couldn't do 100-150 miles in my old i3 without stopping to recharge or using the REX. 50-75 miles each way isn't an unusual commute for a lot of people these days, and 150 a day is nothing for 'Gareth Cheeseman, photocopier salesman'.

PHEVs have a place in the world.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,811 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,811 Posts
Yes it's a bit low, but it gives the Countryman S E the fastest 0-60 time of 6.8 seconds in the range when in dual drive mode.
Outside of UK, an Ampera-e (Bolt) does same 0-60 with no need to burn dinofuel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,811 Posts
The luggage compartment volume is 17.6 cubic feet and can be extended as required to a total of 47.6 cubic feet. That's 498 litres to 1348 litres.
If you have converted US specs that doesn't help compare with EU models as they are measured differently. Bolt has 17 cu ft (US spec) so just as big though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,811 Posts
PHEVs will cut your petrol usage by about a third on any long journey.
Based on reports from GTE owners it is clear that someone mainly doing long journeys would be better off with a (cheaper?) GTD. Same story with Outlander, which Mitsubishi made clear when they launched the PHEV.

Edit: With lower grant and expected worse residuals the GTE has a very narrow value case for a private buyer (20 mile commute) and the MINI will be same. Lower BIK makes either a sensible company car. Of course Eco warriors may be prepared to pay more for the greener image.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
If you have converted US specs that doesn't help compare with EU models as they are measured differently. Bolt has 17 cu ft (US spec) so just as big though.
I'll agree you are correct. Will you agree to stop mentioning the Ampera in every other post?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,860 Posts
Something that never seems to get mentioned is the requirement on most PHEV's apart from the Volt/Ampera to start the ICE when higher acceleration is required.

Surely if the engine is cold you don't want to go to full power immediately and I doubt the CAT will be working when cold either so the stop/start regime of a cold engine being brought in for occasional use can only increase pollution and cause premature wear.

Would the @donald concur?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,811 Posts
I'll agree you are correct. Will you agree to stop mentioning the Ampera in every other post?
But I am still upset we won't get the Ampera-e in UK and too small for us in USA ;)
 

·
I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
Joined
·
23,005 Posts
Something that never seems to get mentioned is the requirement on most PHEV's apart from the Volt/Ampera to start the ICE when higher acceleration is required.

Surely if the engine is cold you don't want to go to full power immediately and I doubt the CAT will be working when cold either so the stop/start regime of a cold engine being brought in for occasional use can only increase pollution and cause premature wear.

Would the @donald concur?
I do, and often I proffer the distinction between a "REx/EREV" and a "plug-in electrified ICE" by whether its performance envelope is delivered on electric only. If it has to use the engine, it isn't really an 'electric car' it's a fuel powered car that uses an electric transmission.

It makes a world of difference being able to use the car in its 'normal' mode and never having to hear the engine until the battery energy is all gone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Based on reports from GTE owners it is clear that someone mainly doing long journeys would be better off with a (cheaper?) GTD. Same story with Outlander, which Mitsubishi made clear when they launched the PHEV.

Edit: With lower grant and expected worse residuals the GTE has a very narrow value case for a private buyer (20 mile commute) and the MINI will be same. Lower BIK makes either a sensible company car. Of course Eco warriors may be prepared to pay more for the greener image.
Whilst I wouldn't ever describe myself as an 'eco warrior', there's no doubt that I was prepared to pay (using my own money) for a car that didn't just have a greener 'image' but one that is genuinely more economical than an equivalent size and power petrol car.

I struggled to hit 50mpg in my similarly sized and powered BMW 120d unless I drove like a saint.

I would not have purchased a GTD-E, should one have existed, not only because of the diesel emissions issue but also that such a beast would be even heavier than the GTE, given the weight of the diesel lump.

We all make choices as to what we drive for all sorts of reasons, and let's not forget that every vehicle has a pollution and resources penalty, even BEVs.

I really don't understand the outcry every time a new PHEV is launched though, where is the disdain for the dozens of ICE cars launched every year?
 
1 - 20 of 1115 Posts
Top