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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For those of you about to do the first insurance renewal - I thought my experience might be of interest.
Last December I insured the brand new model S90 with LV (list £78k - £5k) & it cost me £515.16
Today I received the LV renewal letter & they wanted £730.25 claiming they had just increased it by £60
A quick scout around confused.com and that was reduced to £443.78 with Hastings Direct (with added legal cover) for exactly the same cover as I had before.
Worth noting that given some of the ridiculous quotes FOR IDENTICAL COVER - it appears the companies simply do not want the business.
= £416.79 per year without legal
£416.88 per year
£457.91 per year (includes breakdown and extra legal)
£574.20 per year
£616.00 per year
£1127.22 per year
£1129.97 per year
£1378.08 per year
£1408.44 per year
£1425.13 per year
£1437.00 per year
£1447.00 per year
£1466.70 per year
£1478.42 per year
£1489.52 per year
£1591.83 per year
£1685.83 per year

In spite of Georg's comments on the recent Town Hall about (edited Direct Line) I just could not be bothered to type in all the stuff they want to get their quote.
 

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Are you sure Hastings cover the battery? I'm sure I read somewhere that Hastings and Admiral consider it a consumable and whilst ok in an accident it wasn't covered for any accidental damage, e.g. Metal debris damaging it. Worth checking the small print.



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Hi

It was me who posted about the battery. Not only do Admiral and their other brands not cover the battery, pretty much every insurer will not allow you to go to Tesla approved body shops to get dents etc fixed.

I use NFU because they understand EVs. All the rest - and I spent HOURS on the phone - don't get it.

Do your research, ask the questions, because you might not get the answer you want. Having to spend 20k on a new battery because your insurer won't cover it is something you probably want to know beforehand....
 

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I don't think they can stop you using the Tesla approved body shops but will try to limit the claim to what their own approved repairers will charge. I had this with Admiral on my new Lexus. Their approved repairer would never have worked on the model and I flatly refused for anyone other than Lexus to do the work. They offered cash as an alternative, about 50% of the Lexus quote. Lexus argued their costs were not exorbitant due to the pearl effect finish etc and Admiral caved in.


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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I think the suggestion was meant to be Direct Line rather than First Direct.
Yes typo I meant Direct Line and have edited above
Also I find it hard to get worked up about the fine print of the policy as I have not made a claim in over 30 years so it is really about keeping plod happy
 

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For lower cost EVs like the Leaf or Zoe a claim that requires a replacement battery world probably just result in a full write off claim so not such an issue.
I think you may be missing the point. If the battery is not covered there is no valid claim, so no write off as far as the Insurer is concerned. The cost falls to you.


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I think you may be missing the point. If the battery is not covered there is no valid claim, so no write off as far as the Insurer is concerned. The cost falls to you.


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Just out of interest, do you have any data regarding how many Model S's have suffered catastrophic battery damage without any other damage to the car in the way you suggest above ?

My understanding was that the Model S had titanium underbody armour protecting the battery from road debris (presumably this would be covered) and that the battery was essentially a structural component of the car.

As such I'm not sure how you would destroy the battery without destroying much of the rest of the car too.

I'm just not convinced that there is a problem under any kind of plausible scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm just not convinced that there is a problem under any kind of plausible scenario.
I suspect it would also be almost impossible for them to justify the battery in a MS as a "consumable" given a "new" replacement is nowhere on sale
 

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Just out of interest, do you have any data regarding how many Model S's have suffered catastrophic battery damage without any other damage to the car in the way you suggest above ?

My understanding was that the Model S had titanium underbody armour protecting the battery from road debris (presumably this would be covered) and that the battery was essentially a structural component of the car.

As such I'm not sure how you would destroy the battery without destroying much of the rest of the car too.

I'm just not convinced that there is a problem under any kind of plausible scenario.
No, I haven't any data on it all, I was simply reporting what @ebyard had posted previously. It's too early for me to start researching the market but the fact the some do and some don't is worthy of note.

I'd want to ask them the question "what happens if I skid off the road and severely damage the underside of the car and the battery needs safety investigation etc etc, is the battery covered?"

Totally unrelated but Admiral have a policy clause which invalidates your policy if you cause an accident due to drink and drugs. They limit their liability to that required under the RTA. Now you could argue serves you right for driving over the limit, and I'm certainly not condoning drink driving etc, but I don't know of any other motor policy that has that clause.

I guess with all these things DYOR to your satisfaction.


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I think you may be missing the point. If the battery is not covered there is no valid claim, so no write off as far as the Insurer is concerned. The cost falls to you.


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Yes but the point I was making is that it is highly unlikely that there would be a claim for battery replacement without the rest of the car being written off.
 

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Yes but the point I was making is that it is highly unlikely that there would be a claim for battery replacement without the rest of the car being written off.
Understood. I was insured with Admiral up until July and still have the policy wording. Interestingly, and albeit only a quick glance through it, I can't find any clause that excludes the battery either explicity or implicitly. I wonder whether it has come from some of the other EV's where you have a rental or lease type arrangement on the battery. Caveat Emptor and all that I guess.
 

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Fact is, insurance is all about the unexpected.

Just because you have 30 years no claims doesn't mean you won't have a shunt tomorrow. Keeping the law happy is one thing but making sure your car (and bank balance) is protected is worthy of some proper research.

No matter how well built the car, or how protected the battery may be, it makes sense to get a level of cover you are happy with.

Personally, I don't want to fork out 20k on a new battery so using an insurer that covers it was high on my list.

Make a list of what's important to you and ask questions accordingly.

Re. body shop; yes you could use a non Tesla approved place, but most body shops only know how to bash steel. The MS is mostly aluminium and much more delicate. Also I suspect a non Tesla shop would invalidate any existing warranty. Might be worth checking that out.
 

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Speaking to Aviva re the valet parking thing, thought I'd ask them about insuring the Tesla. They are not insuring them at the moment, although they will for me as I got a quote from them when I was compiling the man maths dossier for SWMBO. That's handy for me. Asked them why and the principle reason is the need for Tesla approved only repairers and the inherent costs therein. They then threw in for good measure concerns over auto pilot and battery problems, but I think these were 'what else can we throw into the mix' rather than genuine concerns.




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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think it is about time the insurance ombudsman stopped this unethical practice of bumping up the renewal prices, I find it's the same with house insurance too and really P's me off.
Even more galling when one of the cheaper quotes is from the very company who you are already with :( (as regularly happens to me with Admiral on my other car)
 

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Understood. I was insured with Admiral up until July and still have the policy wording. Interestingly, and albeit only a quick glance through it, I can't find any clause that excludes the battery either explicity or implicitly. I wonder whether it has come from some of the other EV's where you have a rental or lease type arrangement on the battery. Caveat Emptor and all that I guess.
I cleared this up with Admiral today with a direct question to the underwriters following you mentioning this to me before (on TMC I think!).

You are in fact correct in what you say above, this is all to do with historic deals from Renault and Nissan where the battery was leased separately to the vehicle. In this case they did not insure the battery as the policy holder did not technically own it. Nothing to do with it being consumable.

With EVs where the battery is included in the price of the car and not leased separately then they are covered.

Still not taken up insurance for my X yet, but now have proper quotes from Admiral (who all my existing cars are with) and Direct Line. Still have another option to follow up on before I commit to an insurer.
 
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I cleared this up with Admiral today with a direct question to the underwriters following you mentioning this to me before (on TMC I think!).

You are in fact correct in what you say above, this is all to do with historic deals from Renault and Nissan where the battery was leased separately to the vehicle. In this case they did not insure the battery as the policy holder did not technically own it. Nothing to do with it being consumable.

With EVs where the battery is included in the price of the car and not leased separately then they are covered.

Still not taken up insurance for my X yet, but now have proper quotes from Admiral (who all my existing cars are with) and Direct Line. Still have another option to follow up on before I commit to an insurer.
Excellent work . A lack of insurable interest being the technical reason, and good to know. Further evidence that Aviva were waffling yesterday and the real reason they don't want Tesla's is the lack of control over repair costs. I don't entirely blame them for that, it's a licence for manufacturers to print money and we end up picking up the cost through increased premiums.



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