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Since getting my new Nissan Leaf I’ve been considering getting an extension lead that will enable me to use the EVSE ‘brick’ charger when the car is too far from a 13a socket. I’ve looked at the options and was all set to purchase a lead from www.industrialextensionleads.co.uk, when I remembered that I had a mains hook-up lead left over from the days when I had a caravan. Being a caravan mains hook-up the lead is heavy-duty at 2.5mm and rated at 16amps. I remembered that I also had a fly lead that enabled the hook-up lead to connect to a 13a socket. At this point I was halfway there.

I remembered that the generator I use has a 230v Commando socket. In order to use the generator, I had to make up (with 2.5mm cable) an adapter to enable me to connect appliances with 13a plug to the generator. The next question was would they all connect and allow me to charge the car using the EVSE ‘brick’ charger?

I uncoiled the cable, connected them all, and plugged in the EVSE ‘brick’; no faults were indicated. I did notice that the only part that was getting slightly warm was the 13a plug that was plugged into the house 13a socket, all others were OK. This after ½ hour.

I will remake the connections to the 13a plug, but this seems an ideal piece of ‘kit’ to carry when travelling away from home.

Using the lead and two ‘adapters’ gives me a heavy-duty extension lead that is rated to 16amps. Using the Commando plug to 13a socket adapter on its own enables me to also charge from Commando-socket equipped charging points.

See attached photo for the lead and adapters. What are your thoughts on this arrangement?
 

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I did notice that the only part that was getting slightly warm was the 13a plug that was plugged into the house 13a socket, all others were OK. This after ½ hour.
This is THE problem with an extension lead and why they cannot be recommended.

In your evse with the short lead from plug to 'brick', overheating at the mains plug will be picked up by the brick and shut the unit off. This is not fool proof and there are still example of singed plugs with even just the evse, but at some point it'd shut off. Not so with an extension lead.

I am really surprised that no-one has yet made for sale an 'EV extension lead' with a thermal cut out to each of the plug ends for exactly this reason.
 
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Using the lead and two ‘adapters’ gives me a heavy-duty extension lead that is rated to 16amps. Using the Commando plug to 13a socket adapter on its own enables me to also charge from Commando-socket equipped charging points.
See attached photo for the lead and adapters. What are your thoughts on this arrangement?
I have used the same combination of parts and have had no problems so far.
My hook-up cable is 25m long and my EVSE pulls 9.5 amps at 240 volts (measured).
The 13A plug-top does get hot, I measured 50C using an IR thermometer after an hour.
It was still that temperature after 2 hours so I guess that's OK, nothing seems to be melting.
 

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That's exactly what I used whilst I was waiting for my type 2 charge post to be installed.

Worked fine - but obviously check the 13a parts for overheating. No problems in my case
 

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In your evse with the short lead from plug to 'brick', overheating at the mains plug will be picked up by the brick and shut the unit off.
If only that were true. Lots of "granny cables" have no thermal monitoring in the plugs.

Agree with your general point though - UK 13A plugs are a liability because of the heat generated by the built-in fuses.

I'm surprised that nobody has tried to build a 13A plug that meets the regulations but which uses a non-thermal fuse and so doesn't get hot.

BS1362 covers the requirement for plug-top fuses. I don't have a copy, but I wonder if anything in the standard states that it actually has to be a thermal fuse and couldn't in fact be a different type of circuit breaking device.
 

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I will remake the connections to the 13a plug, but this seems an ideal piece of ‘kit’ to carry when travelling away from home.
I'd be inclined to replace it with a new heavy duty one. 13amp plugs aren't all the same. Fine for most purposes, but not necessarily for the current needed to charge a car.
 

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So, I just ordered one of these and replaced the 13A plug with a 16A Commando plug. I then use it to plug my existing 10A EVSE into when I need to plug into a 16A Commando socket.

The RCD gives me piece of mind...
It might have been better to do that the other way around. Your EVSE should have an RCD in it already, but the cable leading up to it is unprotected - so you want the RCD at the end near the wall socket to protect the cable lying on the ground and the plug/socket in front of the EVSE (and indeed the EVSE itself if it gets run over).

So 13Aplug->RCD->commando skt would be more useful than commando plug->RCD->13A skt.
 

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So indeed, I agree entirely - This does put the RCD near the wall socket!

I have one of these that I plug into it as you describe if I need a longer run - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Masterplug-HLP2013-2IP-Outdoor-Weatherproof/dp/B004R255VQ

(fully unwound of course!)

This means I can deal with a 13A socket and a commando socket and still run an extension a long way without carrying too much kit...

Mine is all about taking power from a commando...
 
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