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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Given the likely issue with availability of suitable DC rapid chargers at peak holiday travel times over the coming summer when EV drivers will be travelling to popular UK holiday destinations at the same time, it would be useful to gather a list of suitable existing locations, close to motorway junctions, where large clusters of >7KW AC chargers are already available.

This could allow EV drivers to plan long-ish breaks in their journeys when they will be confident that they will have access to a working charging point even, if the required charge boost will take 2 or more hours, because this can be used for a meal or shopping break.

This strategy may be less stressful than relying on DC rapids which may have queues or other technical issues that make the overall transaction 'less than rapid' and with significant unpredictability. (I am thinking of CCS drivers using MSAs) 馃槴馃槴馃槴

For example, within 1 mile of my local motorway access point, J7 of the M5 at Worcester South, there is Worcestershire Parkway railway station which has over 22 (yes twenty two!) 22kW ChargePoint posts, a mix of both tethered and un-tethered.

In this example, the railway station has limited facilities apart from toilets but it does have regular trains into Worcester city centre (Foregate St) where there are shopping and eating opportunities. This would allow travellers from the north, heading to the south west, to plan a journey break here with some predictability that they would not encounter the sort of stressful situations that we regularly learn of here.

This example would be of most benefit to those with cars that can charge at close to 22kW, or at least at significantly above the 7kW regular home charging speed.
 

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Given the likely issue with availability of suitable DC rapid chargers at peak holiday travel times over the coming summer when EV drivers will be travelling to popular UK holiday destinations at the same time, it would be useful to gather a list of suitable existing locations, close to motorway junctions, where large clusters of >7KW AC chargers are already available.

This could allow EV drivers to plan long-ish breaks in their journeys when they will be confident that they will have access to a working charging point even, if the required charge boost will take 2 or more hours, because this can be used for a meal or shopping break.

This strategy may be less stressful than relying on DC rapids which may have queues or other technical issues that make the overall transaction 'less than rapid' and with significant unpredictability. (I am thinking of CCS drivers using MSAs) 馃槴馃槴馃槴

For example, within 1 mile of my local motorway access point, J7 of the M5 at Worcester South, there is Worcestershire Parkway railway station which has over 22 (yes twenty two!) 22kW ChargePoint posts, a mix of both tethered and un-tethered.

In this example, the railway station has limited facilities apart from toilets but it does have regular trains into Worcester city centre (Foregate St) where there are shopping and eating opportunities. This would allow travellers from the north, heading to the south west, to plan a journey break here with some predictability that they would not encounter the sort of stressful situations that we regularly learn of here.

This example would be of most benefit to those with cars that can charge at close to 22kW, or at least at significantly above the 7kW regular home charging speed.
Don't all the railway station chargers tend to get used all day from early morning by commuters?
 

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Issue with using council operated chargers is that a) they'll be broken and b) if they're not broken they will be covered by some bobby no name charging company you've never heard of and involve getting a card by post before you go or some half arsed app that doesn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Don't all the railway station chargers tend to get used all day from early morning by commuters?
Perhaps such a site would have a high-ish occupancy during the working week, however unlikely for a 26 post site on a Saturday lunchtime in the holiday season.

This particular example may not be typical as it is a new build site which has had significant future proofing investment to attract EV owners.
 

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Just off A34, ok not an m'way but ought to be, Westgate Shopping Centre car park in nearly-central Oxford has a lot of 22 kW chargers. You pay for parking, and its' not cheap, but the electricity is. Decent loos at the very top story of the shopping centre. Just plug in and wave some card at it seems to work!
 

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The suggestion of using 7Kw charging posts on a long journey to boost range and avoiding Motorway Service Areas (MSA), on the face of it, has merit. Over a couple of hours, then 50 miles range could be added, and excellent if it could be done with a meal break and exploring a new area.

However for me, if I am on a long journey, then I want to make steady progress and 2 hours stop overs could become tedious, especially when having to leave the motorway and find a charging post in an unfamiliar area, which adds unnecessary stress.

After doing a quick review of 7Kw posts in my local area, most are in supermarket carparks and time restricted to 1.5 / 2 hours, there is a couple at the council offices, but these are quite often blocked with employees vehicles during the day. There are some 7Kw Podpoints at Whitley retail area, but because these are free, they tend to be hogged for long periods.

This scenario will be echoed in most areas of the country, so would be off putting for me and possibly others and consequently wouldn't look at this as a viable option.

If I was looking to leave the motorway to find a charger then it would be for a rapid charger (Instavolt by choice) and add 150 miles range in 45 minutes, not 50 miles range, in 2 hours on a 7Kw charging post.

To me, level 2 charging away from home only works on day visits and if you are lucky enough to find a suitable charger at your destination, hook up for a few hours while away. National Trust locations are good for this, Fountains Abbey comes to mind, but even then you have to be lucky to find one free, there are more EV's on the road now (good thing) and don't forget, Level 2 charging, you have to compete with PHEV's, are always looking for a charge, especially when it's free.

If charging on a long journey in summer is going to be such a problem, then I would look to travel by night when it's quiet. The only problem I have found travelling during the night, is that road maintenance is done at night and roads can be closed and detours have to be made, but for me, this is preferable to waiting in a long queue for a charger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The suggestion of using 7Kw charging posts on a long journey to boost range and avoiding Motorway Service Areas (MSA), on the face of it, has merit. Over a couple of hours, then 50 miles range could be added, and excellent if it could be done with a meal break and exploring a new area.

However for me, if I am on a long journey, then I want to make steady progress and 2 hours stop overs could become tedious, especially when having to leave the motorway and find a charging post in an unfamiliar area, which adds unnecessary stress.

After doing a quick review of 7Kw posts in my local area, most are in supermarket carparks and time restricted to 1.5 / 2 hours, there is a couple at the council offices, but these are quite often blocked with employees vehicles during the day. There are some 7Kw Podpoints at Whitley retail area, but because these are free, they tend to be hogged for long periods.

This scenario will be echoed in most areas of the country, so would be off putting for me and possibly others and consequently wouldn't look at this as a viable option.

If I was looking to leave the motorway to find a charger then it would be for a rapid charger (Instavolt by choice) and add 150 miles range in 45 minutes, not 50 miles range, in 2 hours on a 7Kw charging post.

To me, level 2 charging away from home only works on day visits and if you are lucky enough to find a suitable charger at your destination, hook up for a few hours while away. National Trust locations are good for this, Fountains Abbey comes to mind, but even then you have to be lucky to find one free, there are more EV's on the road now (good thing) and don't forget, Level 2 charging, you have to compete with PHEV's, are always looking for a charge, especially when it's free.

If charging on a long journey in summer is going to be such a problem, then I would look to travel by night when it's quiet. The only problem I have found travelling during the night, is that road maintenance is done at night and roads can be closed and detours have to be made, but for me, this is preferable to waiting in a long queue for a charger.
I agree that sites with a handful of 7kW posts aren't really worth trying to plan a one off long journey around, however I was thinking more about sites with an excessive provision of 22kW charging stations like the example given.

Most modern EVs can charge from AC somewhere in the 10-22kW range.
 

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Most modern EVs can charge from AC somewhere in the 10-22kW range.
True a lot of new EVs have an 11kW OBC which is better than 7kW, but not much! To my knowledge only Zoes (and possibly Smart EVs) could exploit the full 22kW, and for many of them, that鈥檚 their maximum 鈥渞apid鈥 speed anyway.
 
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Please excuse me if it's obvious but I have struggled to understand the benefit of huge numbers of 22kW AC. I thought that most EVs now charge at a max of 11 kW AC or faster on DC. So why not a majority of 7 or 11 kW AC (when a location is providing AC rather than DC), with a few 22 kW AC for cars that need greater than 11 kW AC? Are there many cars by volume that need greater than 11 kW AC because nothing else will do?

I realise that I might get laughed at but this is a genuine enquiry, I'm not trying to be clever.
 

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I think it comes from a practical sense of view, single phase supplies will do 7Kwh chargers and three phase will do 22 Kwh chargers. I've still not come across any 11 Kwh chargers but I assume they exist somewhere?
 

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I think it comes from a practical sense of view, single phase supplies will do 7Kwh chargers and three phase will do 22 Kwh chargers. I've still not come across any 11 Kwh chargers but I assume they exist somewhere?
Thank you. Now I see some logic. Cars that can charge up to 11 kW AC will do so on a 22 kW AC charger but can only charge at 7 kW on a 7 kW AC charger. But I guess that AC is cheaper to buy and install than DC chargers. And perhaps needs less overall power per total number of chargers installed.
 

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True a lot of new EVs have an 11kW OBC which is better than 7kW, but not much! To my knowledge only Zoes (and possibly Smart EVs) could exploit the full 22kW, and for many of them, that鈥檚 their maximum 鈥渞apid鈥 speed anyway.
Exactly what I was going to say, you beat me to it, the only EV鈥檚 that charge at 22Kw鈥檚 AC are the Zoe and I understand that Tesla models do as well.

Other manufacturers are now fitting 11Kw AC (Kona and IPace for example) this is in response to the growing market of businesses fitting 22Kw chargers for employees. This is being sold to them as future proofing plus slight quicker charging to accommodate higher ownership levels.

There is also charging losses to be considers as well, which is usually 10%.
 

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22 Kwh AC posts will also charge 11 Kwh capable cars at the full 11 kwh, whereas on my Zoe to get the full 22 Kwh AC I need a 44 Kwh Rapid charger, on 22 Kwh AC post I'm not sure how fast it charges probably maybe 18 or 19 kWh if you are lucky.
 
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