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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Last January I ordered a space-saver wheel for my e-Niro from Brayley's the Kia dealer in Enfield and they required payment of £216 up front. Later, before I received the wheel, Kia told them that the wheel was unsuitable for the car so of course they agreed to refund me. Two weeks ago they requested my bank details and promised to pay me the next day. Last week they said that "you could be anybody" and that I would need to supply ID.They asked for a photo of my debit card by email and I could hide the 16 digit number. They promised to refund me last Friday. I told them that I would visit them in person if they failed to pay me. They failed to pay me so today I made the 20 mile round trip to collect the money. They apologised but they said that they couldn't pay me straightaway but they promised to pay me later that day without fail. I asked for compensation for all my wasted time and the journey to the dealership. The sales executive took my request to the manager who made this statement: "If it was a petrol car we would give you compensation such as a full tank of petrol, but as it is an EV there is nothing we can do."
They again failed to pay me today so I will again make the 20 mile round trip tomorrow and I will be a little more strident.
Can anyone recommend a half decent Kia dealer in the London area?
Update: refund received today so no need to pay them another visit.
 

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I personally think it’s a disgusting attitude to take to a customer. They really hate EV’s I think.
Ask for the cash equivalent to a tank of fuel seems justifiable after 2 20 mile trips.
Also they are at fault, they should have known you can’t use the space saver on an EV and not sold it to you in the first place.
 

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Seems very expensive for a spare wheel - this chap reckons you can just about fit a full size wheel in the boot. Is a steel rim and basic tyre a cheaper option, does have the advantage of being a long term, full speed spare while you get the regular wheel repaired or tyre replaced allowing you to shop around and do it when convenient.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Seems very expensive for a spare wheel - this chap reckons you can just about fit a full size wheel in the boot. Is a steel rim and basic tyre a cheaper option, does have the advantage of being a long term, full speed spare while you get the regular wheel repaired or tyre replaced allowing you to shop around and do it when convenient.
I have followed Peter Cary's advice and now have a full size spare wheel. The steel wheel cost £72 and a cheap tyre cost £55. Total £127 so cheaper than the spacesaver. It's a tight fit but doable.
 

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As covered on SpeakEv before, isn't it dodgy to try to jack up an eNiro yourself? Or is there a fairly safe way to raise one enough to change wheels?
 

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As covered on SpeakEv before, isn't it dodgy to try to jack up an eNiro yourself? Or is there a fairly safe way to raise one enough to change wheels?
Same guy who did the spare wheel video shows how to do this:
Personally I will live with calling someone out as I'm not exactly in the wilderness.
 
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Seems very expensive for a spare wheel - this chap reckons you can just about fit a full size wheel in the boot. Is a steel rim and basic tyre a cheaper option, does have the advantage of being a long term, full speed spare while you get the regular wheel repaired or tyre replaced allowing you to shop around and do it when convenient.

His tyre was 215/55 R17 I wondered if it was a 215/45 or 40 R17 would it decrease the diameter enough to fit In the recess without removing the trim.
By my reckoning that makes 215/55 a 668 diameter.
215/45 a 626 diameter.
and. 215/40 a 604 diameter.
I don’t have my car yet so can’t check the available space but would be interested to know if there is enough.
Someone on here may be a tyre fitter to measure a tyre.
I would use it to get me home or to the tyre fitters, fitted by the rescue service.
 

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I assume that they can take credit card payments and therefore, there is absolutely no reason as to why they cannot do a refund back onto your card, assuming you paid originally by card.

And be prepared to make a scene, standing in the middle of the showroom, request the refund onto your card and sit there until they do it and you get the receipt from their machine
 

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I have followed Peter Cary's advice and now have a full size spare wheel. The steel wheel cost £72 and a cheap tyre cost £55. Total £127 so cheaper than the spacesaver. It's a tight fit but doable.
I’m thinking of going that way too. I can’t imagine driving a car without a spare on board.
I have two concerns though, the original tyres are super high load and speed rated (94W iirc?) so is your cheap tyre similarly rated? This is a very heavy car at ~1800Kg.
Secondly, is the overall diameter the same as original tyres? If not it could cause issues with the ABS/Traction control systems if one tyre spins at a significantly non standard RPM.

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As it is for emergency use only I bought a budget tyre, a Mazzini ECO670 215/55 R17 rated at 98W, and I managed to put it in position while leaving the front insert in place. I assume the diameter is the same as the Michelins but I haven't measured it. The side inserts need to be removed to fit and remove the wheel. It was difficult because the tyre grips the floor and sides. Next time I will put some plastic sheeting underneath to help it slide in. To stop the wheel rocking I tilted the wheel forward and put a piece of 38mmx70mmx100mm wood underneath the tyre at the back. This also allows space for some tabards etc under the wheel which can be accessed from the rear corners. I used a short piece of 8mm threaded rod, a small metal plate and a wing nut to clamp the wheel securely. I managed to fit all the tools listed by Peter Cary in the front insert. This leaves a large extra storage volume inside the wheel. The photo also shows the pump and a first aid kit on the right.
134376
 

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I have the same concerns re jacking up the car (though if the owner's manual supports it then I suppose it is OK).

I also think that this is going to a lot of effort for something that IME happens no more than a couple of times a decade and even then normally is a screw or nail in the tread, i.e something the repair kit should fix OK.
 

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How did you pay, if you had paid by credit card, after being messed around I'd have just got the cash back from the bank. Less hassle with the bonus that the bank would likely add on a charge to the dealer for having to faff about due to their incompetence.
 

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We bought a new Mini in 2003 which had no spare, then sold it a few years later with 85k on the clock, having not had a single puncture.
Well I’ve had my fair share of flat tyres over my driving lifetime. I admit they are usually few and far between but they do happen. I am just not comfortable taking the risk, no matter how slight. I also don’t believe in squirting in horrible gunk in a desperate attempt to get going on a cold, dark wet and windy Sunday night. Not all kinds of punctures can be fixed with the gunk either.

Having a spare on board is simply peace of mind IMHO. But it’s a personal choice at the end of the day.

Peter
 

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We bought a new Mini in 2003 which had no spare, then sold it a few years later with 85k on the clock, having not had a single puncture.
I’ve had 3 in 4 years, all screws and I’m a low mileage driver, 2 were in Aldi car park. It’s just down to your luck.
 

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40 years of motoring and I've only ever been stranded by flat tyres and locking wheel nuts.

On a separate note, for emergency jacking duties I've purchased a Sealey hydraulic scissor jack. It passed its tests with my wife operating the jack. Photos are on this website.
 

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I have the same concerns re jacking up the car (though if the owner's manual supports it then I suppose it is OK).
Kia's official view is that the e-Niro should not be jacked up by someone who isn't a professional because there is a risk of the car slipping and doing damage to the battery which cannot be repaired. I have fitted a full size spare so that the emergency services can change it if I get a puncture. The wheel fits in the boot if the ten screws are removed holding the frame in place. They can be put back once the wheel is in place. My logic is that I shall have plenty of time to undo 10 screws while waiting for the RAC!
 
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