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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everyone,

Recently I purchased my first plug-in hybrid GTE 2016.

I have my own garage so I can charge it from the wall outlet (240V).

My question is if you can advise an extension cord that is safe for giving me no more than 2 extra meters. I live in Hungary so I need something like in the attached picture.
134593



Thank you very much in advance for your time and help!

Adam
 

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The only problem with using an extension lead is that it can overheat and unknowingly, you could cause an electrical fire. The standard 'granny charger' plug (which for your car will probably have a Euro Schuko connector on it) has a temperature sensor fitted, this is not common to plugs but is often used for EV chargers as it lets the charging box sense the temperature of the plug and shut things down if an overload occurs.

If you do use such an extension lead, I would be careful to make sure it is rated for 10 amps continuous current as that is what the car will draw. Many are not rated for this, especially if coiled up like in your picture!

Always seek the advice of an electrician if there is any doubt. A proper EV charger is a better solution in most cases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The only problem with using an extension lead is that it can overheat and unknowingly, you could cause an electrical fire. The standard 'granny charger' plug (which for your car will probably have a Euro Schuko connector on it) has a temperature sensor fitted, this is not common to plugs but is often used for EV chargers as it lets the charging box sense the temperature of the plug and shut things down if an overload occurs.

If you do use such an extension lead, I would be careful to make sure it is rated for 10 amps continuous current as that is what the car will draw. Many are not rated for this, especially if coiled up like in your picture!

Always seek the advice of an electrician if there is any doubt. A proper EV charger is a better solution in most cases.
Thanks a lot for the extensive explanation! Overheating is my biggest concern as well, I’ll look for an electrician for advice.
 

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If you plan to only charge overnight, you can set the "Granny Brick" to pull lower amps.
You can also change the in car settings to pull lower amps.

That way if you use an uncoiled heavy duty extension you can then run it at the 230v / 8amps rather than higher, this will reduce the temperature build up.
A Golf GTE pulling max 240v amps takes about 2.5-3hrs to recharge, so 4-5 on reduced amps.
The car display will tell you how long it is going to be.

The owners manual will show you how to change either the granny brick, or in the in-car menu.

If your plan is to drive in the morning, then recharge as quick as possible for lunchtime use then recharge again for evening use etc ..... then the granny brick is not a good option........
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you plan to only charge overnight, you can set the "Granny Brick" to pull lower amps.
You can also change the in car settings to pull lower amps.

That way if you use an uncoiled heavy duty extension you can then run it at the 230v / 8amps rather than higher, this will reduce the temperature build up.
A Golf GTE pulling max 240v amps takes about 2.5-3hrs to recharge, so 4-5 on reduced amps.
The car display will tell you how long it is going to be.

The owners manual will show you how to change either the granny brick, or in the in-car menu.

If your plan is to drive in the morning, then recharge as quick as possible for lunchtime use then recharge again for evening use etc ..... then the granny brick is not a good option........
Thank you for your comment! I’m also thinking of lowering the amp (easy to setup on the interface) like I did back in my home town.
 

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What do you think of this?
That looks fine, so long as you don't have it coiled up.

I have a similar cord which runs from a socket by my front door, through a groove cut in the door frame, along the edge of my front path to the gate post. I then have a waterproof socket connecting it to the granny charger which is padlocked to an eye bolt in the wall. I limit the charge current to 3 bars on the box, which works out about 1.8kW or 7.5A @ 240V, and the GTE charges from empty in 3.5 hours

I did a lot of checks when I first installed it and nothing gets warmer to the touch than a phone charger. The only issue I've had, is if I charge during the day in summer, and sunlight hits the granny box, it can trigger its overheat protection, but mostly I charge overnight for the cheap / free electricity
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That looks fine, so long as you don't have it coiled up.

I have a similar cord which runs from a socket by my front door, through a groove cut in the door frame, along the edge of my front path to the gate post. I then have a waterproof socket connecting it to the granny charger which is padlocked to an eye bolt in the wall. I limit the charge current to 3 bars on the box, which works out about 1.8kW or 7.5A @ 240V, and the GTE charges from empty in 3.5 hours

I did a lot of checks when I first installed it and nothing gets warmer to the touch than a phone charger. The only issue I've had, is if I charge during the day in summer, and sunlight hits the granny box, it can trigger its overheat protection, but mostly I charge overnight for the cheap / free electricity
Thanks a lot for the comprehensive answer!

I started using that option as well with a 10M cable and everything looks perfect so far. There’s no sun in the garage so temperature - hopefully - won’t be an issue.

Safe charges!
 

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The temperature problems comes from the heating effect of the high current, particularly where the plug meets the socket if the pins are loose or dirty. Also, in the UK we have a fuse in the plug, which adds to the heat.

So, a 16 amp cable is good, but make sure it isn't coiled up or the wires inside the coil can overheat as they have no air cooling.

Start it charging and then after a few mintes check that the plugs are not getting too hot - they might get warm, which is fine, but not hot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The temperature problems comes from the heating effect of the high current, particularly where the plug meets the socket if the pins are loose or dirty. Also, in the UK we have a fuse in the plug, which adds to the heat.

So, a 16 amp cable is good, but make sure it isn't coiled up or the wires inside the coil can overheat as they have no air cooling.

Start it charging and then after a few mintes check that the plugs are not getting too hot - they might get warm, which is fine, but not hot.
First time I stayed there for the charging - just to make sure lol. :D
 
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