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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I took delivery of a brand new 70reg EGolf on Tuesday and have charged it fully through my front room window on a normal 3 pin household socket. It took a while to charge, which was fine, but when it was fully charged it said I had a range of just 111 miles! Now I know real world mileage is around 125, but I was pretty sure the range would be a lot higher than that with a full charge! Is this normal for a new car? It is cold today as I write this, but it was mild a day or so ago when I finished charging it. Any help gratefully received. Merry Christmas.
 

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That estimated range is based on its previous usage. Don't worry about it; just drive normally without risking a flat battery pack and the range value will creep up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That depends a bit. If the OP drives like a joyriding teenager it might go down :)
To be honest I do sometimes have an issue with a heavy right foot! But, my daily drive is straight into the city of London and the speed limit is a heady 20mph and there’s cameras every 5 feet to make sure you abide by the rules. So there will be a mix of steady sensible driving, and the occasional increase in speed where safe and possible! I’m hoping it should even out over time. One other other thing I’d like to ask, I sit in a lot of traffic and was wondering if the battery is fetched drastically while I’m not moving? I would probably have the heating on low and my music playing via Apple car play. Cheer in advance gents.
 

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was wondering if the battery is fetched drastically while I’m not moving?
This is one of the best bits about driving electric. Whilst you're not moving there's hardly any juice coming out of the battery. It's mainly stuff run from the 12 volt battery (which is then topped up by the big battery). Mainly it's stuff like the AC and heating. On mine that will be the equivalent of 4 miles in an hour. So if you shut those off you're barely using anything at all. However, as I said, it's so small a drain that I wouldn't bother being uncomfortable just to save a few electrons. It ain't worth it.

Another plus is you aren't putting out all those noxious gases whilst standing still. (y) (y) (y) (y) :) :) :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is one of the best bits about driving electric. Whilst you're not moving there's hardly any juice coming out of the battery. It's mainly stuff run from the 12 volt battery (which is then topped up by the big battery). Mainly it's stuff like the AC and heating. On mine that will be the equivalent of 4 miles in an hour. So if you shut those off you're barely using anything at all. However, as I said, it's so small a drain that I wouldn't bother being uncomfortable just to save a few electrons. It ain't worth it.

Another plus is you aren't putting out all those noxious gases whilst standing still. (y) (y) (y) (y) :) :) :)
That’s so good to hear. Please forgive my spelling, damn autocorrect is a nightmare!
My journey is only 12 miles and I intend to keep the battery charged on a daily basis, just in case I may need it. So I’ll definitely need to be keeping the heating on and the comfortable amenities on.
very much looking forward to many silent and clean miles of driving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If your drive home was mostly at 70mph+ then 115 miles is about right. I have a regular 90 mile trip and arrive with 10- 20 miles left in the winter.
Thanks for that. Do you keep your car topped up everyday? Also, what EV do you have and if you charge it at home do you use a proper charging point or a standard plug? And lastly, how much does it cost for a full charge?
I’m really not sure if it’s worth paying £450 for a charging point if running the cable through my window and plugging it into a standard socket does the job. What would you say? Thanks again to you all for your advice. I’ve only ever had standard engines cars so this is all very Greek to me despite all my research.
 

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Mine full is saying about 78 miles at the moment. Last usage was a couple of weeks of short runs, lots of preheating, plenty of heater use on the move so efficiency very low. As said, the GOM is based on previous usage so unless you’re doing the same trips all the time it’ll inevitably be out. Don’t worry about it!
 

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Thanks for that. Do you keep your car topped up everyday? Also, what EV do you have and if you charge it at home do you use a proper charging point or a standard plug? And lastly, how much does it cost for a full charge?
I’m really not sure if it’s worth paying £450 for a charging point if running the cable through my window and plugging it into a standard socket does the job. What would you say? Thanks again to you all for your advice. I’ve only ever had standard engines cars so this is all very Greek to me despite all my research.
Others will have their own view but I always recommend going for the 7 kW home charger. Once installed it lasts for many years and fits all modern EVs, using the type 2 connector. A grant is still available towards the cost of purchase and installation - not sure of you had factored that in with your figure. Wether or not you use the 3 pin plug or a 7 kW home charger, it is possible in many homes to switch to a special tariff for EVs, for example Octopus Go which gives a good day rate and four hours overnight at 5p per kWh. That means you can charge your car for just over 1p per mile of travel.

I had an e-Golf for 12 months and currently a Tesla Model 3. Sounds like you have made a wise choice for your journeys. I echo the sentiment of others - just put climate control on and at a comfortable level and enjoy the car.
 

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And lastly, how much does it cost for a full charge?
Mines 43 (ish) kWh. I have Octopus Go which costs 5p per kW for 4 night time hours (mine is 21:30 to 01:30). Works out at around £2.15, but it's rarely a full charge every night as there is always some left in.

You can charge every night if you wish, but you only need what you need for the day/journey plus a bit. It's up to you. You'll get used to your usage pattern and charge when you think necessary. My daughter charges her's almost every night. She has a Leaf 30 and a very long commute. If she forgets to charge for work days she has a struggle to get home. I'm retired, so I make sure that I have enough for tomorrow's journey. If I'm going nowhere (and there's enough for getting about) I don't bother charging. I charge about twice a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Others will have their own view but I always recommend going for the 7 kW home charger. Once installed it lasts for many years and fits all modern EVs, using the type 2 connector. A grant is still available towards the cost of purchase and installation - not sure of you had factored that in with your figure. Wether or not you use the 3 pin plug or a 7 kW home charger, it is possible in many homes to switch to a special tariff for EVs, for example Octopus Go which gives a good day rate and four hours overnight at 5p per kWh. That means you can charge your car for just over 1p per mile of travel.

I had an e-Golf for 12 months and currently a Tesla Model 3. Sounds like you have made a wise choice for your journeys. I echo the sentiment of others - just put climate control on and at a comfortable level and enjoy the car.
That’s great advice, thank you very much for taking the time to give it.
I have to admit that the wall charger is a lot less faffing about, I imagine. I had factored in the grant reduction. It’s with Hive and it’s cheaper than the nearest competitor by about £90. There will be a subscription cost after the first year, but I think it’s about £10 for the year, so nothing too drastic.
I've just signed for another year with my energy supplier so will have to bear that for now. I’ll mainly be charging it at work though. It’ll be on a 3 pin plug, but it’s in a locked car park and there’s an outside point to plug in to, and best of all, it’s totally free!! I just think it would be best to get a wall charger now before the grant is stopped and prices rocket. We’ll all be driving electric soon enough.
Thanks for the compliment, the e-Golf is lovely, but your Model 3 is downright amazing! Wish I could have afforded one of those on a lease, but they’re out of my price range.
 

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it’s totally free
That's pretty much the trump card if you're OK with the slight inconvenience.

before the grant is stopped and prices rocket.
Yeah, but probably no.
The feeling is that the grant inflates what installers charge (they want some or all of it for themselves) and also requires a more expensive smart charger.
As EVs become more normal there will be more production and more installers (and more experience), so prices could actually fall. And if you're happy with a dumb charger it could get very cheap.
The unknown is your specific installation - Some houses are just difficult to fit and that can get expensive. Which is another reason to perhaps defer such a project if it's optional because if you get it done now and then move in a year or two it could be money down the drain. (Nice selling point if the new owner is an EV driver, but just now they are a small minority.)
 

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If you're only doing 12 miles a day plugging in at work on the granny charger will be all you need. I wouldn't recommend charging fully from the granny every day but if you are only needing to add a few miles worth of charge each day I would think that's fine.
I have a wall charger at home, wouldn't think of not having it as often so longer runs where the car needs fully charging but I also use the grant charger at work a couple of times a week, it's free and I need the charge to get home.
Cost wise I'm with octopus on the 5p for 4 hours each night. An empty battery needs about 30kwh, more of its a new battery and completely empty, but at 5p per kWh it doesn't cost much.

For the ID3 VW are recommending charging to 80% and discharging to 40% if that's all you need each day, to help the battery life. Many on here will say just plug it in and use it, but there are plenty of others, myself included, that wouldn't charge to 100% every day if you don't need to.
We have done 53000 miles in our Golf over the last 3 years so often have to charge to 100% but when we're only doing short miles I only add what I need to keep the battery above 50%.
 

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That’s so good to hear. Please forgive my spelling, damn autocorrect is a nightmare!
My journey is only 12 miles and I intend to keep the battery charged on a daily basis, just in case I may need it. So I’ll definitely need to be keeping the heating on and the comfortable amenities on.
very much looking forward to many silent and clean miles of driving.
The bold part may not be such a great idea. Car batteries don't like to stay for long times above 80%. Neither do they like going under 20%. Cars usually have a limit to prevent you from damaging your battery, but charging fully every day if you do such low mileage will still probably end up damaging your battery in the long run.

Recommendation: only charge when you drop below 40%, and unless you know you need the extra range, only charge up to 80%. I understand you don't want the car to get in the way of your lifestyle, and it shouldn't. But being overcautious may damage your car in the long run. Only charge fully if you think there's a good chance you'll need the extra range.
 
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