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I do think I will wait for the right 30kwh car to come along, the decision now really is...is the Tekna really worth the premium one has to pay over the Acenta?
What is the difference in trim? Leather, surround cameras, heated steering wheel and rear seat. Anything else?
The Tekna leather I have seen doesn't seem to wear well and for a run around, maybe fabric trim could be better, cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.
As a 30kWh Tekna owner I would say get an Acenta unless you really want some of the Tekna features. If I was buying again I would probably get an Acenta and pocket the difference. (I wasn't able to test drive either before purchase - I took a punt during the lockdown last year buying remotely from a trusted seller)

Heated seats and steering wheel is nice, but I find the drivers Leather seat a bit hard and uncomfortable without some padding and the heater is good enough in the car that I don't really find myself wanting to use the heated seats much anyway. (Although I do use the heated steering wheel in winter)

Birds eye camera view is genuinely useful (especially when there are no parking sensors) but not a reason on it's own to choose a Tekna. Can't comment on the Bose subwoofer as I haven't heard a Leaf without it. Stereo in the Tekna is "OK" after a bit of EQ adjustment but nothing impressive, so I guess the Acenta will be "OK" with less bass and a little bit more room in the boot...

The big problem with the Tekna for me is the wheel size - yeah the Tekna wheels look much better than the Acenta wheels, but the 215/50/17 wheels just don't ride very well, I find the ride pretty harsh (especially on crossclimate+ which made the ride worse) and although I haven't driven an Acenta I'm sure the ride would be more compliant with the smaller 205/55/16 tyre size. Also tyres for the Tekna wheels are pretty much 2x the price of those for the Acenta wheels and there are far fewer tyres to choose from in that size. (It's an uncommon size) So if you do a lot of miles or get a lot of punctures a Tekna is going to cost you a lot more in tyres.

If you have a fixed amount of money and the choice is between a 30kWh Acenta or 24kWh Tekna I'd get the 30kWh Acenta any day as that extra 25 miles range is absolutely worth it while the Tekna differences are mainly perks/toys and you get penalised on the ride quality and tyre cost front.

Try to take both an Acenta and Tekna for a test drive to see how you find the ride and seat comfort of the two. I wish I'd been able to test drive last year but it wasn't possible in the lockdown and I needed to change cars urgently so I took a punt. Apart from the tyre size/cost/ride issue and having to pad the drivers seat slightly I've been very pleased with the car, however in hindsight I think I would have been perfectly happy with a similar condition Acenta, perhaps happier if the ride was better than the Tekna.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
146271

Can the experts on here give me their thoughts on the SoH of this battery. It's provided by the vendor. A low mileage 2017 30KwH car.
Thanks
 

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SoH 96.16% and cell balance of 16mV. Looks very good, in fact I doubt you'll find much better for the age and mileage.

My 2016 Leaf 30 was at 92.4% at 24k miles when I bought it last year.
 

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2021 Hyundai Kona Ultimate 64kWh
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View attachment 146271
Can the experts on here give me their thoughts on the SoH of this battery. It's provided by the vendor. A low mileage 2017 30KwH car.
Thanks
That looks good to me. Nice and high SOH for the age, cells look quite well balanced and no real signs of weakness even when not fully charged, and it's not had too many charge sessions either. 53 Rapid charges is pretty low, and 450 regular AC charges means it hasn't been getting constantly plugged in to top it back up to 100% like some people do and can potentially harm the battery by doing so.

Going by the state of the battery, it looks like a safe purchase. As long as the rest of the car and it's price tag are both good too of course!
 

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Its good as far as it goes but the Hx figure (a measure of the ease of charging of the battery) is lower than I'd expect. You really need the voltage gap figure at 10% or less SoC to be absolutely sure.
 

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Leaf 30kWh, HS PHEV
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Next newbie question.

Can a 24kwh Leaf just be charged from my home 3 pin socket overnight, we are only likely to do 50 miles in a week normally, without having to upgrade the wiring/sockets? It's okay to leave it for 8-10 hours as we have a driveway.
Obviously only paying 6 or 7k for a car, I initially don't want to have to install a charging post until I am sure that EV is the way forward for us.
Provided you have a good outdoor socket installed yes you can use granny charger.

Dedicated chargers are more reliable, less of a fire hazard but you can use granny charger to start with.

Leaf charges on Rolec
Outlander charged on Granny for 11 months
HS Phev now charging on same socket, relocated due to shorter granny cable.

Check the socket regularly for burn marks for to arching


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Its good as far as it goes but the Hx figure (a measure of the ease of charging of the battery) is lower than I'd expect. You really need the voltage gap figure at 10% or less SoC to be absolutely sure.
A measure of "ease of charging the battery" ? That's about as non technical as you could get. The truth is that the meaning of the Hx figure is not really understood. From the Leafspy manual itself:

Hx The meaning of this number is not fully understood but it appears to be inversely related to the battery internal resistance. As the internal resistance of the battery pack increases it is thought this percentage decreases. As internal resistance increases more energy is lost within the pack and the pack heats up more under load.
For what it's worth I have been recording SoH, Ah, Hx and other figures of my car's battery in a spreadsheet since I've had the car (I now have 45 data points) and graphing them - and looking at the graphs the Hx figure just follows the exact same curve as the SoC figure but offset a bit.

That's not really how cells behave - as they lose usable capacity it doesn't necessarily follow that internal resistance goes up in proportion to capacity loss, usually internal resistance stays much the same until a lot of capacity is lost and/or there is cell damage, then it rises quickly.

So I'm not convinced that Hx actually is a measure of internal resistance of the cells and that it's another guess on the part of the Leafspy author. (like the red/blue bars indication of balancing) If internal resistance of the cells was going up significantly it would cause rapid charging speeds to drop dramatically and/or cause charge tapering to occur earlier when rapid charging - an effect I did have on my Peugeot Ion which developed a couple of cells with high internal resistance.

As I said earlier, this battery is about as good as you're likely to find at the age and mileage - the Hx figure (whatever it means) was only 78% on mine at 4 years and 24k miles vs the 85% reported here.
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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A measure of "ease of charging the battery" ? That's about as non technical as you could get. The truth is that the meaning of the Hx figure is not really understood. From the Leafspy manual itself:


For what it's worth I have been recording SoH, Ah, Hx and other figures of my car's battery in a spreadsheet since I've had the car (I now have 45 data points) and graphing them - and looking at the graphs the Hx figure just follows the exact same curve as the SoC figure but offset a bit.

That's not really how cells behave - as they lose usable capacity it doesn't necessarily follow that internal resistance goes up in proportion to capacity loss, usually internal resistance stays much the same until a lot of capacity is lost and/or there is cell damage, then it rises quickly.

So I'm not convinced that Hx actually is a measure of internal resistance of the cells and that it's another guess on the part of the Leafspy author. (like the red/blue bars indication of balancing) If internal resistance of the cells was going up significantly it would cause rapid charging speeds to drop dramatically and/or cause charge tapering to occur earlier when rapid charging - an effect I did have on my Peugeot Ion which developed a couple of cells with high internal resistance.

As I said earlier, this battery is about as good as you're likely to find at the age and mileage - the Hx figure (whatever it means) was only 78% on mine at 4 years and 24k miles vs the 85% reported here.
Just checked mine and HX is 118% which is higher than it was last time I checked. Soc has dropped it a bit to 95% from 96.5%. Cell balance was 14mv, the best it's been.

I ran the battery down to 4%, way below what I normally do: the low battery warning appeared at 6%.
I used 75% to cover 150miles due to blasting down the A1 on sunday but that still equates to 200miles on a full charge, or 2miles/%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thanks everyone for their comments and advice.
The car looks really good, just have to decide if it's worth travelling to the other end of the country or wait for something similar more local. I do now understand LeafSpy far more now though👍
 

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Have you considered using the 'buy to order' service provided by a forum member who runs his business admin from the Orkneys but buys and delivers anywhere in the UK.

He is Jonathan Porterfield of Eco-Cars. He charges a flat finders fee of £360 and handles all of the buying admin. Delivery extra and varies of course. You give him the wish list and max budget and he uses his large experience in EVs to source a decent model for you. Could be worth having a chat with him to see if he can help.

Used Electric Cars for Sale - Used Electric Vans - Eco Cars (eco-cars.net)

This video is him showing the process when buying a Soul.

 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
This one is at Cleveley EV, so at a well respected dealer.
According to them the battery SoH is normal for its year and mileage. Not too many fast charges.
 

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Johnathan Porterfield of Eco-Cars has close a relationship with Cleveley I think. He has used someone from there to deliver his purchased cars around the UK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I believe I have now found the right car for me a 2017 30kwh Tekna.
I now need to understand the charging network as I will have a 120 mile home journey.
60 miles will get me around the Bristol area.
Which charging networks should I sign up to?
I presume I will need a fast charge CHAmeDo, such as GeniePoint?
What do people recommend?
I have downloaded ZapMap is this reliable?
Any good fast charging recommendations around Bristol without having to go into the centre.
Thanks all👍
 

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You don't say which direction you will be arriving into the Bristol area from. My first choice when on a road trip is always Instavolt chargers for reliability and there are two sites available in and around Bristol. (With a third at Portishead a few miles West) One is North of the city at the Bannatyne Gym near to Redland rail station and the other on the A370 South West of the city. If you select the filter for Instavolt on the ZapMap site you will see their locations. Both will have twin units available and both will use a contactless bank card with Chademo available on both chargers too. No need to join any 'clubs' or load apps to use Instavolt. They just work exactly as all chargers should. Hassle-free reliable charging.
 

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ZapMap is the standard - not tied to one network, and the web site has a lot of useful info especially if you are new to EVs.
A Better Route Planner does what it says - well worth a look and said to be very accurate.
Instavolt chargers are reliable and take contactless payment, and often installed in pairs or multiples, so recommended.
If you are using motorways, the chargers at motorway service areas were originally Ecotricity Electric Highway and not terribly reliable, and needed the Electric Highway app, but Gridserve has taken over the Electric Highway and is installing much better chargers which take contactless payment. Check Gridserve EH map for updates (literally daily - they are moving fast!)
You don't say which route you are taking, but ZapMap and ABRP will help you to find chargers on the way.
All DC charger locations have at least one Chademo connector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Sorry will be coming down the M5 then going East of Bristol on the M4 then South M32 to the A37.
Then down to Dorchester.
Bristol will be about 60 miles.
 

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I second the recommendation of ABRP (A Better Route Planner) - They have both an app and website. It will tell you where is best to charge along your route and how long for. Pop your route into there and see what it says.

It's surprisingly accurate and may suggest that it's better to plug in elsewhere for a quick and easy journey.
 

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You didn't specify the start point either but if its 60 miles to Bristol from the M5 direction and you plan to use the A37 then it must only be around 75 to 80 miles to Shepton Mallet where there is another Bannatyne Gym with 2 x Instavolt chargers.

80 miles in a Leaf 30 Tekna at this time of year is doable and a short stop there would load enough to get another 40 miles to home. Driving gently you could probably make it 120 miles anyway but one stop somewhere would be sensible. As long as you start off with 100% SOC of course and drive at a reasonable speed for range safety.
 
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