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Hi All...

Another Newbie !!

Bought a 3 year old 2014 Leaf Tekna with 30k on the clock, 6 weeks ago.

I had 2 cars, one for everyday a 2005 Peugeot 407 estate diesel that I was doing about 18k miles a year in and a 2006 Range Rover 6k miles a year to pull the caravan. Been thinking about a Leaf to replace the Peugeot purely on cost saving which mainly did 60 to 80 mile return commutes, then the clutch needed replacing which forced my hand.

So far couldnt be more delighted... the car is pure joy to use, very fast with ECO off and so so quiet. Peugeot cost 14p a mile in fuel, Leaf 2.5 to 3p. Have to say, so far Range Rover is hardly being used as Leaf is really so great to drive and praclical, the whole family love it !!! I think they are very very under rated. Now I have knowledge of all the charging points within my commute, the range issues have all but disappeared. I have found that even with the 80 mile range shown when 100% charged, the 80 mile round trip is achievable (with care). Having said all that, I know the cold weather will shorten the range, so am intending to have charge points placed at both properties I commute to.

In short the Leaf will easily pay for itself in 3 years, just in time for the new 2018 leafs to be coming on the second hand market... Happy Days !!!!
 

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In short the Leaf will easily pay for itself in 3 years, just in time for the new 2018 leafs to be coming on the second hand market... Happy Days !!!!
This is exactly how i usually buy cars. Wait till the new model is 1 or 2 years out and grab a second hand bargain.

Problem is now, I am so impatient to get myself an EV that can do the 150 mile trip down to my mums house without stopping that im struggling to stop myself considering a lease of the new one!
 

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Now I have knowledge of all the charging points within my commute, the range issues have all but disappeared. I have found that even with the 80 mile range shown when 100% charged, the 80 mile round trip is achievable (with care). Having said all that, I know the cold weather will shorten the range, so am intending to have charge points placed at both properties I commute to.
I keep a tally of all my daily trip mileages and charging, and for my 2013 Acenta I find that in June/July I use about 1.15 to 1.2 %battery charge (SOC)/mile [=83-86 mile range to zero % SOC] but in Dec/Jan/Feb I use about 1.5 to 1.6% SOC / mile [= 62-66 mile range]. This is mainly driving on single carriageway country A roads at an indicated 50-55mph.

Mind you, I don't like planning on pushing the SOC below 10% (and my wife [SWMBO!] prefers it if I keep well above that) so the practical ranges are less than the theoretical ranges quoted above. Also, if you are charging at a Rapid charging post, the charging rate reduces rapidly above 80%SOC, which reduces the planning mileage between Rapid charging posts.

Remember, hills borrow %SOC at a rate of about 2-3% SOC for every 100m of climb, but you get that back on the subsequent descent. Rain and wet roads, however, steal %SOC because of the work done by the tyres pushing the water out of the way.

At what % SOC does the Low Battery Warning [LBW] appear? As the LBW is said to appear when you have 4kWh left in the battery, the % SOC at which the LBW appears gives an idea of the battery health. When I first purchased my Acenta (1 year old ex-demo), the LBW appeared at 18% SOC, it now appears at around 20% SOC showing there has been a bit of degradation in the last 3 years.
 

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Hi.. Thanks, interesting reading. I have not analysed my driving to that degree as it is a very relatively recent purchase. I ideally aim to always get back home with 10 miles on the range. I have on a few occasions been 10 miles from home with a range of 12 miles and not been left stranded, I have found the range seems fairly accurate if I keep to 50 mph on single track roads and 60 on dual carriageways. Having said that one of my commutes is 30 miles with a 50/50 mix of both and I frequently find I only use 20 miles of range. This is not always the case it does depend on the range I set off with for some reason. Same trip with no air con etc. with same driving style can take hugely different chunks off the range.For example, set off with 80 miles, and use 40 on a 30 mile run. Next day, set off with 60 and use 20 on the same run. Overall, this commute with 80 miles starting ends after 60 miles, with approximately 10 at the end. In short very happy with the cars performance so far.
 

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This is exactly how i usually buy cars. Wait till the new model is 1 or 2 years out and grab a second hand bargain.

Problem is now, I am so impatient to get myself an EV that can do the 150 mile trip down to my mums house without stopping that im struggling to stop myself considering a lease of the new one!
Have you looked at the Polar website Polar Plus I use this all the time to identify charging points. Personally on a 150 mile trip I would look at charging twice, with my car. For me the saving of about 20k on a new car with paid for batteries compensates for the ability to charge only once. Remember fast charges which again on my car will give you about 60 miles only take about 30 mins.
 

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@Oldman, the display of estimated remaining range that you mention two posts above is just an estimate, based on the state of charge of the battery etc and the consumption over the previous 8-10 miles. It is commonly known as the Guess-o-meter or GOM, and in hilly country this title is well deserved as it fails to take into account the effect on range of uphill and downhill gradients.

I find it more instructive to have displayed in front of me the %SOC of the battery - one of the options selected by the top left of the block of 4 buttons to the right of the steering wheel - the one above the trip counter select/reset button, and with experience I now know for the 'can I get home or do I need to stop and top up' decision the %SOC with which I can safely pass the charging points on my way home.
 

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I find it more instructive to have displayed in front of me the % SOC of the battery.
I use that display too.
And it's then an easy calculation in my 24 Leaf as each % gives me around 0.8 miles.
I actually use 8 miles per 10% ( As things like 37 x 0.8 = 29.6 are beyond my mental ability.)
It's a pretty reliable method and far better than using the GOM.
 
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