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It kind of begs the question... why? And why have they clipped the battery warranty on all new cars if they can do this?

I don't think I've driven 2 million miles in my life and I certainly wouldn't want the Metro I first drove. And if the thinking is battery second life as storage then its a very different duty cycle to that in the car.

Apologies if I'm too cynical today, it ust seems to be about headlines and not manifesting itself into policy.
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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One option would be to make batteries transferable from one car to another. Let's say you can interconnect 10 kWh modules through standard interfaces. You buy a car with a 60 kWh pack. Your next car is bigger, you need more range so you buy an extra 20 or 30 kWh and put them into the new car with your existing modules and voilá.
 

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One option would be to make batteries transferable from one car to another. Let's say you can interconnect 10 kWh modules through standard interfaces. You buy a car with a 60 kWh pack. Your next car is bigger, you need more range so you buy an extra 20 or 30 kWh and put them into the new car with your existing modules and voilá.
Give it a few years and the power density in a new battery will be double the current one making them much lighter, the production cost will be lower making the replacement not that extreme, the peak charge and discharge rates will be higher making charging quicker and performance greater... why would I want to keep the old one?
 

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And why have they clipped the battery warranty on all new cars if they can do this?
They are referring to the new form factor batteries in development.

Even if the cells last 2 million miles there’s other stuff that can go wrong in a pack, such as cooling circuit and BMS.
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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Give it a few years and the power density in a new battery will be double the current one making them much lighter, the production cost will be lower making the replacement not that extreme, the peak charge and discharge rates will be higher making charging quicker and performance greater... why would I want to keep the old one?
That is probably true for the next 10 years or so. But battery technology will plateau eventually. The technologies we are developing now will probable converge into the 'optimal' battery with maybe small incremental changes from there. I think from an ecological and financial (for the customer) perspective it makes a lot of sense to not supply batteries with each new car, but to allow them to be reused. Unless some dirt cheap and easily recycleable technology comes along that would render re-use inviable.
 

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That is probably true for the next 10 years or so. But battery technology will plateau eventually. The technologies we are developing now will probable converge into the 'optimal' battery with maybe small incremental changes from there. I think from an ecological and financial (for the customer) perspective it makes a lot of sense to not supply batteries with each new car, but to allow them to be reused. Unless some dirt cheap and easily recycleable technology comes along that would render re-use inviable.
Elon mentioned on the Battery Day presentation that eventually (very long term) Tesla will obtain most of the materials for new batteries by recycling existing ones. Whether that is company policy, just aspirational or positive comment for the media is open to challenge, of course.
 
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