Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For my job in UK, it’s likely that in the next few months I will be asked to join a new team involving a daily 5 day commute of 35 miles outbound plus 1-20 miles in the community once at work and then return home. This is therefore seemingly looking like 3 years of roughly 20k a year including leisure driving, so I need a really reliable car as mine is now 14 years old. Work is able to pay 40p a mile even for electric cars so it’s the right time to go electric. There are a number of Tesco supermarkets around with both 7kw and 50kw chargers near the new work.
My budget wont stretch to any new electric cars involving lease or pcp especially with the high mileage involved so have ignored cars like Ioniq, new leaf, Kia e-niro, and Kona. My budget is approx. 12K and after bit of research also feel following used examples are not appropriate:
BMW i3 too unreliable and complicated
VW Golf GTE plug in ditto

This means I need a car that has to be reliable, electric and able to manage the daily commute with optional rapid charges if need be.

Potentially I am thinking used 2016 Nissan Leaf 30kw with optional 6.6kw on board charger that will have covered 20-40k so the majority of the Nissan 80k battery is still intact and hopefully not have a battery that won’t have lost much battery health. As the 30kw seems capable of approx. 100 miles conservatively average between summer and winter, the onboard charger could be used to top up the charge for an hour at 7kw (FREE at Tesco’s) to give me the necessary range to get home as 7kw charges gives 22kw per hour. The optional 6.6 charger is identified using either the weight of the car (1970kg) or the digital display showing time to 100% charge showing both readings.

Following advice I am thinking of installing home charger using government grant, advising DNO, changing electricity tariff suitable for EV’s (Octopus) and making sure the car comes with locking wheel nuts as well as the granny and type 2 cables (as the car will have the optional 6.6kw onboard charger), having telemetrics changed, checking the sat nav SD card is installed, and getting Connect app.

Advice on internet suggests that as the daily commute is mostly flat A and B roads, switching eco off and using B mode for driving including town to yield potentially 4-5kw economy (I am a very gently driver). Tyre pressure advice seems to suggest around 38psi which is slightly inflated above normal levels to help economy.

To preserve the battery state of health I would plan to home charge every night and use 7kw charge stations to top up and not use the 50kw chargers which are also available but I believe not good for long term life of the battery.

Is there anything else I need to consider?
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
17,804 Posts
£12k might get you a ZOE 40, but prices have been strong recently.

Although a slightly older Zoe 20 might do the job as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,040 Posts
Welcome
Clearly you have already done a lot of research.
Main advice - purchase LEAFSpy and a suitable dongle to check the state of the battery and the BMS update.
A LEAF30 will see you through what you want easily.
Enjoy!
Don't mess around with a battery lease. Stick with an owned battery.
The Zoe is a smaller and more fun car than the LEAF, but less well equipped and stupidly overvalued ( ;) ) at the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
You might want to think about the 7kw charger gives 22kw per hour.

With a 6.6kw onboard charger the best a 7kw evse will deliver to you is 6.6kwh in an hour. Which I guess in a leaf might be just over 20 miles. Is that where the 22 figure came from?
 

·
Registered
NISSAN LEAF 62Kwh
Joined
·
779 Posts
You might want to check out a KIA SOUL you can get a very decent low mileage MY2016 for £12K - reliable and will do everything you require.

If you are going to install a home charge and take advantage of the grant, then there are rules that have to be met such as off the road charging, so worth checking that out.
What is you home wiring like? They usually insist that your supply is protected with a 100amp fuse, most properties only have 80amp fuse, although your energy supplier normally upgrade free off charge.

If your internal wiring is not modern there may be additional cost to allow for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
£12k might get you a ZOE 40, but prices have been strong recently.

Although a slightly older Zoe 20 might do the job as well?
I have to carry lots of equipment and have a family so possibly the Zoe wont be big enough. I think something Leaf size will give me more options. I like the Zoe but coming from years of owning Japanese cars, I have heard reports the Zoe can be a bit unreliable?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Welcome
Clearly you have already done a lot of research.
Main advice - purchase LEAFSpy and a suitable dongle to check the state of the battery and the BMS update.
A LEAF30 will see you through what you want easily.
Enjoy!
Don't mess around with a battery lease. Stick with an owned battery.
The Zoe is a smaller and more fun car than the LEAF, but less well equipped and stupidly overvalued ( ;) ) at the moment.
The leafspy is the app combined with the OBD2. Yes, that makes great sense! Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You might want to think about the 7kw charger gives 22kw per hour.

With a 6.6kw onboard charger the best a 7kw evse will deliver to you is 6.6kwh in an hour. Which I guess in a leaf might be just over 20 miles. Is that where the 22 figure came from?
Have to admit feeling a bit confused on this subject. Internet seems to vary depending on what you read as to how much juice you get in an hour. I have seen quotes varying from 20-25 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
You might want to check out a KIA SOUL you can get a very decent low mileage MY2016 for £12K - reliable and will do everything you require.

If you are going to install a home charge and take advantage of the grant, then there are rules that have to be met such as off the road charging, so worth checking that out.
What is you home wiring like? They usually insist that your supply is protected with a 100amp fuse, most properties only have 80amp fuse, although your energy supplier normally upgrade free off charge.

If your internal wiring is not modern there may be additional cost to allow for.
All good points. The main fuse is 100a but this is rented house approx. 20years old so unclear as to the state of the wiring. Seems to have an up to date RCB board. Luckily we have a drive so we should qualify in that regard. The suggestion of the Kia Soul is interesting as that was completely off my radar. You guys are so helpful.
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
17,804 Posts
I have to carry lots of equipment and have a family so possibly the Zoe wont be big enough. I think something Leaf size will give me more options. I like the Zoe but coming from years of owning Japanese cars, I have heard reports the Zoe can be a bit unreliable?
It’s not small inside. We have two kids and the Zoe would take a double buggy in the boot. You sit slightly higher in it as wellwhich can be a benefit.

In practice the Zoe is no worse than the Leaf for reliability - both have their own unique flaws.

Of interest might be the fact that all Zoes have 22 kW AC charging, which can be useful if you’re trying to fill up at destination chargers.

The app works OK for the Zoe and it has remote pre-conditioning activated from the key fob.
 

·
Registered
30KW Tekna (2017)
Joined
·
925 Posts
NO! Average is not your friend here. Use the worst case winter, because that's the one where you'll be calling for recovery at 6pm when it's all gone south.
Jan-Feb with a long day at work. That's what you need to cover, ideally with 10-20 miles to spare.
I was gonna say its those "unexpected miles" that get you!
 

·
Registered
MG EZS 2020
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
Don't mess around with a battery lease. Stick with an owned battery.
Wholeheartedly agree. The problem of selling on a battery lease car will become exceedingly frightening in the very near future. Even if Renault do allow lease buy-outs (which they are currently talking about and almost did early this year) it will put used Zoe prices out of a lot of peoples reach. Been there, done that, ate the pie!
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
17,804 Posts
The problem of selling on a battery lease car will become exceedingly frightening in the very near future.
If that were true then all the battery lease Zoes would be falling in value, not increasing as they have been.
 

·
Registered
MG EZS 2020
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
The main fuse is 100a but this is rented house approx.
Don't forget to get your Landlord's permission to install a charger. If nothing else, it's good manners to do so. :)
 

·
Registered
MG EZS 2020
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
If that were true then all the battery lease Zoes would be falling in value, not increasing as they have been.
Just extrapolating what I see the future to be like. I don't feel that many people will want to pay £99 (£147 unlimited in OP's case) on top of the monthly payments for what someone has already called 'an overvalued' car.

I parted with my Zoe not only because the MG is a better car, but also that I can see the bubble popping on used Zoe prices ,as more models become available, purely because of the cost of the battery rental on top of the purchase price. Basically I've jumped ship before it flounders.
 

·
Registered
MG EZS 2020
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
In practice the Zoe is no worse than the Leaf for reliability - both have their own unique flaws
Quite agree, but I feel a lot of that reputation belongs to the earlier Zoes, who I consider were sold to us so cheaply so that we could Beta test them. The 41 kWhs hardly suffered anywhere near as badly as the 22 kWh. In fact, I had 3 flat-bed journeys with my 22 kWh and absolutely no problems with the 41 kWh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
It’s not small inside. We have two kids and the Zoe would take a double buggy in the boot. You sit slightly higher in it as wellwhich can be a benefit.

In practice the Zoe is no worse than the Leaf for reliability - both have their own unique flaws.

Of interest might be the fact that all Zoes have 22 kW AC charging, which can be useful if you’re trying to fill up at destination chargers.

The app works OK for the Zoe and it has remote pre-conditioning activated from the key fob.
See is really interesting. Because of my bias against French (petrol) cars because of their unreliability I had ignored the Zoe but am beginning to review how I feel. So you say it has 22kw charging, as opposed to 6.6kw on the leaf?
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
17,804 Posts
See is really interesting. Because of my bias against French (petrol) cars because of their unreliability I had ignored the Zoe but am beginning to review how I feel. So you say it has 22kw charging, as opposed to 6.6kw on the leaf?
Yes. It’s the Zoe party trick. Worth checking if there are any free 11 or 22 kW chargers near you. We have some at our local Sainsbury’s.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top