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Discussion Starter #1
Well shortly I will be needing 2 new tyres. I know little about the different tyres, makes and quality etc. What are people experiences.

I have so far looked at just replacing with the same as is fitted mitchelin primacy 3. I have seen the mitchelin cross climate which is I believe a all weather tyre.

Thoughts please :) (y)
 

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Don't just replace the front summers with all season tyres or you'll end up backwards in a hedge very quickly! Perversely, whilst you need more grip on the fronts (with front wheel drive) to get moving, you need more grip on the rears to ensure you keep travelling face first especially under heavy braking or cornering (y)
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 22/9/20 (was Prius)
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Can’t advise which to get, sorry, but whichever you go for be careful to get the extra load rated ones (94). These cars are heavy!
Just for my curiosity, how many miles did you manage? I am expecting this car to be very hard on the front tyres.

Peter
 

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I switched mine front to back at about 3-3.5mm tread and 18000 miles.
Sold the car at 25000 but would have expected to get 30-35000 miles out of the first set of tyres.

Before anyone comments you should have the most tread on the rear I have never been in a situation where that has been an issue and have only lost the rear end of a car with rear wheel drive and took much accelerator. I experience understeer much more frequently.

I was planning to wear them all down to about 2mm over the summer and put cross climates on this winter, but then many things haven't worked out as planned this year.
 

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Before anyone comments you should have the most tread on the rear I have never been in a situation where that has been an issue ...... I experience understeer much more frequently.
The difference in tread depth (ignoring surface water) won't make much difference as you say but the purpose of putting on an all season or winter tyre is to improve grip in cold, icy or snowy conditions. In this scenario, there will be a huge variation in traction between the axles, with the front tyres providing much more grip under braking / cornering. The rear of the car will lose traction well before the front and slide sideways in an attempt to overtake you. Now if you're an experienced driver with plenty of space on the road around you, you may catch the slide and be lucky. Personally I wouldn't bank on either, most drivers mistake miles driven as a very bad proxy for skill and luck is not a factor you should use to save your expensive EV or somebody's life (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the comments, I was heading to put 2 Cross climates on (both fronts) but am now reconsidering, due to people's comments, never even thought about traction/grip conundrum. Looking into prices, it did mention they will only fit in pairs to same axle, so that says something.

So heading towards primacy 3's. Anybody know difference between primacy 3's and 4's.
 

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So heading towards primacy 3's. Anybody know difference between primacy 3's and 4's.
I looked it up once and the only difference that was stated in terms of specs actually went in favour of the Primacy 3. So I have no idea what the benefit of the Primacy 4 is.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Tyre review says, the 3 tyre replaced the Michelin Primac and then has been replaced by the Michelin Primacy 4.
The 4 tyre offers a new a reference for safety. After three years of development, this tyre provides a high level of performance on wet roads, from the first use until worn to the legal wear indicator (1.6mm). This tyre, thus responds to the need to perform at a high level when worn; a long lasting performance.

So looks like a natural progression of the range.
 

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The difference in tread depth (ignoring surface water) won't make much difference as you say but the purpose of putting on an all season or winter tyre is to improve grip in cold, icy or snowy conditions. In this scenario, there will be a huge variation in traction between the axles, with the front tyres providing much more grip under braking / cornering. The rear of the car will lose traction well before the front and slide sideways in an attempt to overtake you. Now if you're an experienced driver with plenty of space on the road around you, you may catch the slide and be lucky. Personally I wouldn't bank on either, most drivers mistake miles driven as a very bad proxy for skill and luck is not a factor you should use to save your expensive EV or somebody's life (y)
I wasn't suggesting putting all seasons on one axle only. I swapped front to back when the fronts were getting low with the intention of wearing all 4 tyres down so I could put Cross Climates on this winter.

I've already got CC's on the Golf and they are a big improvement this time of year. They have better grip in the summer than the tyres fitted on the Golf when new, in the winter there's a big difference.
 

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I wasn't suggesting putting all seasons on one axle only. I swapped front to back when the fronts were getting low with the intention of wearing all 4 tyres down so I could put Cross Climates on this winter.

I've already got CC's on the Golf and they are a big improvement this time of year. They have better grip in the summer than the tyres fitted on the Golf when new, in the winter there's a big difference.
I didn’t think for one minute you were suggesting it but clarifying for the OP that more tread is not the same as more grip 👍
 

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I switched mine front to back at about 3-3.5mm tread and 18000 miles.
Can’t recall seeing you mention it but did you have any issues with the TPMS objecting to the wheel locations?
 

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The tyre rating specified by the manufacturer is designed to be able to carry the weight of the vehicle safely and in doing so perform in a particular manner regards handling, ride etc.

The rating essentially reflects the stiffness of the structure of the tyre (particularly its sidewall) to support the extra weight.

What you will find is that as you increase the stiffness, you will see a harsher ride over bumps (the tyre sidewall flexing, normally absorbs some of the impact before the suspension reacts) and also slightly less tendency to roll in corners as the front inner tyre resists flexing as it comes under load.

This is generally why runflat tyres give a harsher ride, their sidewalls are stiffer to support the tyre even after deflation.

Going up in rating (within reason) is therefore a bit of a personal taste thing but going down could be a safety issue in terms of the day to day stress on the tyre which will flex much more than a higher rated tyre with all the usual heat / wear that may entail.

IMO as always of course.
 
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