Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a newbie, 99% about to pull the trigger on an e-Niro.

One of my main trips would be to a static caravan in mid Wales (I live about 160 miles from there so I'm fine one way). The electricity there is metered and so there should be nothing to stop me charging it there in that regard, albeit from a 3-pin plug equivalent, which I believe will only get me about 9 miles recharge per hour on the e-Niro, which is fine as I'll have it plugged in overnight.

My question is whether there are any potential problems or anything I need to be careful of in terms of the specification of the power supply? It's a 32A supply, is all I really know. To avoid trailing a wire out of a window, I was just going to buy a Y-splitter to fit at the supply and exterior plug box and do it that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
So the car should come with the affectionately-named 'granny charger', which is designed for charging from a 13A socket when you visit your granny. So using that should be absolutely fine; you've already checked the charging speed on that and you know what you're going to get.

The car will draw only a maximum of 10A this way, so you'll have 22A left to play with. That's 5kW (240v x 22a = 5280w), so you'll perhaps need to be mindful before using other heavy electrical items (Hairdryer, fan heater, electric oven) at the same time as charging.
Some granny chargers can be set to limit their draw to 8A or 6A for precisely this reason, with a corresponding drop in charging speed.

Do check the socket you're using for any evidence of arcing or overheating - if it shows signs of this, cease use and arrange to have it replaced.
 

·
Registered
Kia Soul EV 2020
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
Do check the socket you're using for any evidence of arcing or overheating - if it shows signs of this, cease use and arrange to have it replaced.
You should start by reducing the current. I can't remember what the brick is capable of, but you should be able to reduce the current to 6/8A. This will reduce your charging speed but will save you from fire damage.

If there are no signs of overheating, you can increase the current.
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
21,644 Posts
I’d be surprised if the connection was a dedicated 32 Amps. This may be the case if they are catering for motor homes.

In most cases the connection is shared, so you might find if you are drawing 10 amps and there are a few other caravans, then it may trip the breaker.

Then there’s the voltage drop due to the size of the site.

In any case you can try, but have a back up plan for charging in case it’s unusable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
We used to have a caravan and all the sites we stopped at had a blue 16A connector at each pitch for power fitted to a box with a meter. We had a lead that just connected the caravan to this socket and the caravan was wired inside with a fusebox and a few normal 13A sockets. Most sites had a meter in the box with the connector and a circuit breaker and we have found that those breakers can be a bit troublesome at some sites. I have not seen a site with a 32A connector but it is some years since we owned a caravan so may be things have been upgraded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,589 Posts
Suggest you modify your granny charger so that it plugs directly into the CEE Y splitter and entirely avoids the 13A BS1363 plug issues.
There are posts on this forum re this including issues around thermistors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
We used to have a caravan and all the sites we stopped at had a blue 16A connector at each pitch for power fitted to a box with a meter. We had a lead that just connected the caravan to this socket and the caravan was wired inside with a fusebox and a few normal 13A sockets. Most sites had a meter in the box with the connector and a circuit breaker and we have found that those breakers can be a bit troublesome at some sites. I have not seen a site with a 32A connector but it is some years since we owned a caravan so may be things have been upgraded.
Well OP has mentioned its a static caravan which have more permanent connections than a pitch would, certainly rare to see one that 'plugs in'.
We had a static caravan for holidaying when I was a kid, ancient thing so can't imagine the wiring was particularly great and it was on a large site with ours being almost the furthest you could. be from the entrance to the site (where I'm guessing the supply would've been vaguely close to). In the colder months ample use of fan heaters were a must, at 3kW each we could easily be drawing 6kW for a few hours at a time, we never had any issues.
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe 50
Joined
·
21,644 Posts
In the colder months ample use of fan heaters were a must, at 3kW each we could easily be drawing 6kW for a few hours at a time, we never had any issues.
Of course a fan heater doesn't care much about earthing or the voltage.

If it get's cold, and there are lots of people on site staycationing he might have fun.

Just so long as he's not relying on it to get home, it should be fine.
 

·
Striving for a greener planet
Tesla Model 3 LR AWD 19" FSD; Renault Zoe Q210 22kWh
Joined
·
406 Posts
So we have done this. I have a static and plug my M3 into it every time we visit.

We added a new 20A dedicated connection to the internal fuse board of the 'van and then fitted an external 16A blue plug under the decking. Has worked flawlessly. Get a constant 4 kW.

143676
143677


My dad has a Kona and uses a blue plug to 3 pin adapter with no problems. I should probably try his Kona on my Tesla connector and see if he also gets 4 kW.

I looked at the Y connector straight off of the "site's" fuse board but it turns out our van was hard wired in. Also, speaking to a friendly member of staff, he told me they may get the hump if they spot it.

In terms of power supply, we may be lucky, ours is all good. We gave it a good stress test turning as much stuff on as we can and nothing popped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
I should probably try his Kona on my Tesla connector and see if he also gets 4 kW.
A mate tried this using his Tesla portable charger and it does indeed charge another make of electric car OK and will charge at whatever the rating of the special short adapter lead that is plugged into Tesla unit is rated at. There is some clever stuff going on with that flat multiple pin connector on the Tesla adapter lead that tells the charger what current to charge at and the charger just seems to be a normal one inside not something that is unique to Tesla.
 

·
Striving for a greener planet
Tesla Model 3 LR AWD 19" FSD; Renault Zoe Q210 22kWh
Joined
·
406 Posts
Just to add to my post, we did get a sparky to come in and do a test of the new circuit and test the earthing and all was fine.
Looking at the sockets in the 'van, and mine is brand new, I wouldn't suggest plugging into one of them. They don't look or feel particularly good quality. Definitely go for an outdoor blue plug as it can handle the draw of power over a long period of time. And if you upgrade your granny charger you could get 4 kw, and every little helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Those commando plugs are as tough as old boots and seem to survive anything that gets thrown at them on building sites. they are made to be abused outdoors on industrial sites and are most probably very much better engineered than most domestic stuff. Although we usually used the yellow 110V ones they look to be close to identical to the blue ones used for 230V and I would have no worries about using them up to their full rated current as I have never heard of one of these burning out but have seen a few scorched 13A plugs and sockets over the years.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top