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I own a LEAF, but I lost faith in Nissan a while ago when they got left way behind by other EV newcomers on battery management and did nothing about it.

The Ariya is too little too late, and it's not going to be built in the UK. So, I'm out.
 

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2017 Renault Zoe R90 Signature Nav
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First and foremost, there are no parking bays in the UK big enough for this 😂 😂 😂
Second as @TVEV had mentioned, Nissan seems to be loosing in the race with all the other manufacturers regarding battery management. And last....I am scare to think about how much it will cost......Mercedes and Jag price braket perhaps?
 

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What also interests me is the lack of Nissan dealer capability to diagnose and fix the leaf power train after a decade with the factory here.

How will that transfer to a new and utterly different train (likely full of bugs) made in Japan?
 

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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Nothing wrong with the Nissan Leaf. I am on my third moving from 24 to 30 and 40 kWh. They were all very comfortable, well made and with all the gizmos anyone could want. From my own experiences of test driving alternatives, I found cheaper cars, cars with greater range, bigger cars and faster cars. However, based on my own needs, it was first choice on all occasions.
 

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The Ariya looks good, but there will also be the Skoda Enyaq as a competitor and that looks even better - my experience of owning both brands is that the Skodas are better put together.
Hopefully that will make both manufacturers sharpen their pencils a bit when it comes to pricing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Orrery,
Pricing for the Enyaq is already available as is the many many pages of Option Packs / Options it has, as the standard base model is lacking a lot of kit - nearly everything is an option, if you are not careful can easily go in excess of £50k for a Skoda......

However I still have it down as an option, just want to see prices for the Ariya are so I can decide which I may go for. Apparently pricing should be announced end of December (If that's true or not remains to be seen)......
 

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"2021 Nissan Ariya price and release date
Nissan hasn’t confirmed how much the Ariya will cost when it goes on sale in late 2020 or early 2021, but it’ll probably be one of the most expensive cars the brand makes. Expect to pay from around £40,000 to £45,000 for an entry-level two-wheel-drive 63kWh car and closer to £60,000 for a top-spec Performance model."

"2021 Electric Skoda Enyaq iV revealed: price, specs and release date
Costs from £33,450 (excluding plug-in car grant)"

"Volkswagen ID.4 electric SUV revealed: price, specs and release date
Will likely cost from £45,000"

The Ariya is likely to be more expensive than the Enyaq, and similar in price to the VW ID4. So, a Nissan priced similarly to a VW. I know which one I would go for.
 

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Nothing wrong with the Nissan Leaf. I am on my third moving from 24 to 30 and 40 kWh. They were all very comfortable, well made and with all the gizmos anyone could want. From my own experiences of test driving alternatives, I found cheaper cars, cars with greater range, bigger cars and faster cars. However, based on my own needs, it was first choice on all occasions.
Thats how we feel. Our lease on our 40 expires in 12 months and it would not surprise me if we got another Leaf next time, despite its battery 'issues'
 

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Now that the 1st edition price for the VW ID.4 has been confirmed at £37,800 after grant, it will be interesting to see who would prefer to buy an Ariya at a similar price point (or possibly more). However, list price doesn't seem to mean much these days, it will be down to finance offers and fleet buyers, before we see how successful it is.
 

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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The Ariya looks impressive and will almost certainly be my next car. I just hope the seats are as comfortable as the Leaf's. I would go for the large battery FWD.
 

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Yes, the Ariya is a great looking car. EV competition around the £40k mark is going to be very interesting by 2022.
 

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If the Ariya is as reliable and well-built as the Nissan Leaf, it can blow most of its competitors out of the water. If priced at the same level as a Model 3, I can't see of any reason why to choose for a Model 3.
The price point of the new car is out of my budget, but when my Leafs take their last breaths, if that will ever happen, I will certainly look at the Ariya to replace them.

Say what you will about the Leaf, complain about the lack of thermal management, but it's an extremely well-built car with very few defects and long battery life.

Almost 80.000km/60.000miles on them and not a single shop visit.

As for the 2018 Leaf and E-NV200, Nissan please give them a design update. The design is ok but they could use a more Ariya-esque look. They will sell like hot cakes.
 

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As for the 2018 Leaf and E-NV200, Nissan please give them a design update. The design is ok but they could use a more Ariya-esque look. They will sell like hot cakes.
Not another new front and rear end on the old chassis 😀 doubt if NISSAN would have the nerve to think they would get away with it for third time. - or would they?
 

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New chassis with space to wrap water coing/heating around the 62kWh old battery case. Make it an estate with a tow hook and if bite their arm off.
After a 39kWh (good}. a 40kWh (dire) and a 62kWh (brill, yet to rapidgate) I have an elicit relationship with Leafs. 😉
 

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Not another new front and rear end on the old chassis 😀 doubt if NISSAN would have the nerve to think they would get away with it for third time. - or would they?
I'm a fan of the old chassis, I'm on it everyday with my 24kWh.
If it ain't broke don't fix it.
The Leaf chassis is so good IMO, it feels like a Mercedes E-Class.

I don't see the merits of an active thermal management system when Rapidgate is/was only an issue for long road trips, which are not the most common driving profile of a Leaf.
If you are driving 800km every single day, the Leaf is not for you. In fact, no EV will be good enough for you.

Active thermal management has many drawbacks:
-Higher vehicle purchase cost
-One more thing that can go wrong
-Consumes energy for driving profiles that would not require its use
-Marginal battery longevity improvements
-Higher battery replacement costs

Passive cooling is sufficient for a 40kWh or less affordable EV.
On the occasional long trip, you'll wait a bit longer for the charging, that's all.

If Nissan does offer active thermal management, I hope that they make it optional for the lower end cars. I also hope that if they put it, that it will go through a heat exchanger on the cabin heat pump so that heat is not wasted but chanelled to the interior whenever the heat pump is in use.

Things that I want to see on a newer Leaf:
-Floor heating in the front+better isolation at floor level. Cold air seeps in from somewhere.
-A full-size spare tyre under the bonnet in a way that it would enhance crash survivability
-Leafspy type display in GT-R style with Gids and all
-A mode to select 12V battery charging during main battery charging with warning for risk of fire when charging in closed spaces
-22kW AC charging
-230V 2.4kW self-winding charging cable integrated upon request (free option)
-Type 2 AC port usable as CCS port in addition to Chademo.

Why Chademo + CCS?
In Europe, having both is not a luxury.
Sometimes the Chademo is out of service, sometimes the CCS.
Adapters don't always work.

Why the 230V self-winding cable?
Because it's one less cable to have in your trunk and can always be useful in an emergency even if you have a faster charger installed.
I have come to notice that most ICE drivers don't know that you can charge your EV in a regular 230V outlet, without having to call in an electrician for mods. This is of particular interest for rural area's where old houses still have old electric wiring and anything over 3kW could cause a fire.
Putting that self-winding cable and then showing it in a commercial will blow so many minds, people will be lining up to buy the car.
EV manufacturers don't realize how off-putting it is to see commercials where the cars are plugged into something like an EVBox in their garage.
Show that you can plug it into a regular outlet the same way as your smartphone and everyone would want one.

I'm off to plant more trees.
 

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One more thing that I forgot to mention. Someone else did but I want to stress this.
A towing hitch for the full 750kg (EU norm), with overload sensor on the car if needed.
This is a must for the next Leaf and the Ariya.
 
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