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Discussion Starter #1
Hello peeps,

Today I ordered both this car and POD Point.
From what I understand, this car is only capable of 3.3kw charging, and the 7kw POD Point is AC... so does this mean that despite the POD Point being 7kw, I will only get 3.3kw coming in to the car?

Do any home charge units output DC, or are they all AC? I'm wondering if I should have ordered something else!

Thanks,
Mark.
 

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You can buy a 6.6kW charger for about £600 but is it worth it? :devilish:
I'm gradually winding John in! ;)
 

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Is that true? The charger I bought cost more than that.
You haven't bought a charger. You've bought a charge-point.
The charger (which converts the 240VAC to DC suitable to charge the battery) is in the car. That is limited to 3.3kW in your car.
The charge-point is just a glorified contactor to connect your house AC to the car while providing various safety functions and usually some 'intelligence' to allow remote control of charging and data exchange.

DC charging, like you find when travelling is a different animal.
 

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Is that true? The charger I bought cost more than that.
(On board) Charger = the rectifier/voltage controller on the car that converts the AC to DC to charge the battery
Charge point = Connection from the mains to the car, sometimes with an OLEV grant
 

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Hello peeps,

Today I ordered both this car and POD Point.
From what I understand, this car is only capable of 3.3kw charging, and the 7kw POD Point is AC... so does this mean that despite the POD Point being 7kw, I will only get 3.3kw coming in to the car?

Do any home charge units output DC, or are they all AC? I'm wondering if I should have ordered something else!

Thanks,
Mark.
My electricity supply to the house is a looped supply (at the moment - info on another thread).

So my Pod Point was installed and regulated to 3.5kWh out put, the installer just pressed a couple of switches on the unit to reduce the output.

They could do the same for you.
 

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Hello peeps,

Today I ordered both this car and POD Point.
From what I understand, this car is only capable of 3.3kw charging, and the 7kw POD Point is AC... so does this mean that despite the POD Point being 7kw, I will only get 3.3kw coming in to the car?

Do any home charge units output DC, or are they all AC? I'm wondering if I should have ordered something else!

Thanks,
Mark.
Not overkill at all.
A bit of future proofing.

Same as my set up 5 years back. I now have 2 EV both with 6.6kWh onboard.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
I have your exact setup

Leaf 24kwh type 1
Pod point 7kwh

One word: future proof

Type 1 will be redundant as will a 3kwh socket (in my opinion I might as well be charging off commando or 3 pin).
Hi Chad,
Good to know someone with the same setup!
I'm not very clear on the types of sockets, so am a bit baffled. If the POD Point 7kw has a socket which will be redundant, how is it future proof? Or is the socket on the POD Point different from the Type 1 which plugs into the AC input on the Leaf?
Thanks,
Mark.
 

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Hi Chad,
Good to know someone with the same setup!
I'm not very clear on the types of sockets, so am a bit baffled. If the POD Point 7kw has a socket which will be redundant, how is it future proof? Or is the socket on the POD Point different from the Type 1 which plugs into the AC input on the Leaf?
Thanks,
Mark.
You can choose a PodPoint with a tethered type 1 cable and plug or a type 2 socket which means you need a lead like the one you'll need to use a public charge point (type 2 to type 1) to use it.
If you choose the former you'll have to change the tethered cable or plug when you get a newer car (e.g. most EVs now use a Type 2 plug including the newer LEAFs), but it is not difficult and will cost less than £100.
 

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Hi Chad,
Good to know someone with the same setup!
I'm not very clear on the types of sockets, so am a bit baffled. If the POD Point 7kw has a socket which will be redundant, how is it future proof? Or is the socket on the POD Point different from the Type 1 which plugs into the AC input on the Leaf?
Thanks,
Mark.
You don't say whether your PodPoint has a tethered cable (attached to the unit) or untethered (separate cable that plugs into the unit). If the latter, the socket on the PodPoint will be Type 2, and the cable will have a Type2 plug to plug into the PodPoint and a Type1 plug on the other end to plug into your car. If tethered, it will be a Type1 cable, which you'll need to upgrade to Type2 if and when you get a newer car.

I see someone else has posted while I've been typing, so maybe they have answered this already.

Edit: As I thought. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks again folks.
Yes I have ordered an unteathered PODPoint as it's less messy for the driveway, and draws less attention from passing pedestrians (when I'm out) - and most cars come with cables, so when I get another EV it will probably have a type2 to type2(or other).
Ok, so it seems my 7kw PODPoint box will have a type2 socket and hopefully my car will come with a type2 to type1 cable as well as a 3pin UK to type 1 cable for home charging for the 3-4 weeks before PODPoint install. Correct?
Cheers 😊 Mark.
 

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It is definitely a good idea to get a 7kW charging point as any future EV you get is most certainly going to take full advantage.

As others have said, a socket is probably more sensible for an older Leaf as no new cars have Type 1. You may want to buy a dedicated lead to avoid having to coil up and put back in car for public charging, but used Type 1 cables are cheap here and on ebay.

Also, do NOT get the switches changed - there is absolutely no reason unless you have a supply issue. The car will only take 3.3kW - it is doing the charging.
 
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Yes I have ordered an unteathered PODPoint as it's less messy for the driveway, and draws less attention from passing pedestrians (when I'm out) - and most cars come with cables, so when I get another EV it will probably have a type2 to type2(or other).
After driving an EV for 8 years I am sure you will soon get bored of unplugging and putting away the cable! One reason I got a tethered PODPoint when I changed to Type 2 was the cable management is tidy vs most others.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
After driving an EV for 8 years I am sure you will soon get bored of unplugging and putting away the cable! One reason I got a tethered PODPoint when I changed to Type 2 was the cable management is tidy vs most others.
Probably true. At the moment I can't wait to hear the sound of the cable clicking into the car on my driveway 🤗
 

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3.6kWh hour ChargePoint here but the car can only charge at 3.6kWh anyway. Obviously I would have liked a 7kWh hour ChargePoint but would have been a huge upheaval and could not be bothered. So far it's been no trouble at all but what would be nice is if the car had the capability of 7kWh at public ChargePoints. There have been countless occasions when rapids are bust etc and I've been low on charge so charging at 7kWh instead of a painful 3.6kWh would have been very welcome.
 
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On the matter of power and cables and cars there are three points where this can be limited.
The charging point can be set to a maximum power (usually where the house supply is limited).
The car may have a limited power ability.
The cable used to join the two also has a limit, set by a resistor built in.

Charge rate is dictated by the lower of the three, so if you have a 7kW point and 7kW car, but a 3kW cable you'll only get 3kW.

Cables for less than 7kW are lighter and cheaper which catches the unwary who think they are getting a bargain.

Being flexible means they don't last forever if in regular use, so if you expect to keep a 3kW car for several years then a 3kW cable is probably fine until you change car, especially if it is free with the car anyway.
If you need to buy the cable and expect to change car sooner then in terms of future proofing it may be better to get a 7kW cable now.
 

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Cool
On the matter of power and cables and cars there are three points where this can be limited.
The charging point can be set to a maximum power (usually where the house supply is limited).
The car may have a limited power ability.
The cable used to join the two also has a limit, set by a resistor built in.

Charge rate is dictated by the lower of the three, so if you have a 7kW point and 7kW car, but a 3kW cable you'll only get 3kW.

Cables for less than 7kW are lighter and cheaper which catches the unwary who think they are getting a bargain.

Being flexible means they don't last forever if in regular use, so if you expect to keep a 3kW car for several years then a 3kW cable is probably fine until you change car, especially if it is free with the car anyway.
If you need to buy the cable and expect to change car sooner then in terms of future proofing it may be better to get a 7kW cable now.
Thanks, that's interesting. Just been out to look at all my cables and fortunately they seem to 32A :) Pity everything else is 16A 😆 My ChargePoint is non-tethered being a type-1 car but with an occasional type-2 car here it would be daft otherwise. ChargePoint hides in the garage, being ugly :ROFLMAO:, with a cable permanently plugged in.
 
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