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Hi all - I'm new to this forum and a brand new owner of a 2014 Nissan Leaf 24, my first EV. I'm very excited.

So I'm trying to get to grips with the car's range. Having read enough on this forum I now understand a few things:

  • ignore the GOM (had to search around to find out what that meant) and focus on the batt% instead
  • accept reasonable amounts of variability even on the same route and same conditions
  • hills are a killer
  • same for city driving with lots of stop-starts
  • filling the car with kids doesn't seem to make much difference though
  • don't assume that charging points needed for top-ups are working or available - have a plan B and plan C
Any other tips?

Below is a table of battery % used and miles travelled per trip. The uphill (300m) and return downhill runs are amazingly different. I'm more confused by the city trips, as EV database suggests that I should be getting more miles in city driving compared to motorway driving - potentially up to 125 miles assuming full SOH (which I can't quite believe) - but it seems to be the opposite.

Do these energy consumption figures seem reasonable to you? As context, I live in Glasgow, it's never really above 20C (sigh), and batt condition is a full 12 bars. The car has done around 50k.

cheers, Paul

133035
 

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Welcome! Hope you're enjoying the car so far.

You have 12 bars of battery capacity but that doesn't necessarily mean you have a fully healthy battery pack. The first bar covers about 12% or so, off the top of my head before you lose it. A car of that age, unless it has had a replacement battery is probably close to losing the first one, and it's obviously been well cared for if it hasn't already lost it.

The figures you're showing don't seem terrible. Of course you can boost them by going easy on climate controls, keeping your tyre pressures right, or just a little higher, using eco mode and adapting to EV Driving by using the brakes as little as possible, planning ahead to allow regen to work, and accelerating gently. For future reference, your car does have built in consumption readings available, measured in Miles per kWh. It's a universally accepted measurement and seeing your average there is probably more useful and easier for everyone to understand.

Your real killer for range is going to be a few months down the line as we go into winter. The cold temperatures, strong winds, rain, ice and snow are the biggest variables. Try to use climate timers if possible to have the car warm before you unplug the car, keep the car comfortable rather than hot, and try to use the heated seats and wheel if you have them, rather than the heater as much as possible to maximise range if you need to go the extra distance.

Download Zap Map and ABRP Apps if you will ever be going beyond the range of your battery so you can see what chargers are around, if they are working, and plan the best routes. As you have already said yourseld, be sure to make plans for alternative places to plug in.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The figures you're showing don't seem terrible. Of course you can boost them by going easy on climate controls, keeping your tyre pressures right, or just a little higher, using eco mode and adapting to EV Driving by using the brakes as little as possible, planning ahead to allow regen to work, and accelerating gently.
Thanks for the tips. I'm a little surprised that I'm not getting better mileage as I'm doing all of this except checking tyres (which I'll now do). And the weather is mild right now, so as you say will only get worse from here.
 

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I had a Leaf 24 some 5 years ago and always gauged available distance using the % battery left indication. I used a simple formula of 0.8 miles per % which worked to cover a mixed pattern of all driving and all-weather and terrain differences. In practice, I used to work by glancing at the % left and used 8 miles per 10% showing.

I checked your chart data and the total shows that over 121.7 miles you used 146% of battery energy. That is 0.83 miles per % and falls into my own rule of thumb calculations and also give a small margin of miles to cover for a charger not working.

The only thing that you missed off your list of tips was speed. In fact, that is always top of my 'killer' list. Even travelling on motorways at 65 instead of 70 indicated makes a huge difference in range. Hills tend to be ups and downs in range if you pardon the pun. And in undulating territory it evens the range out as long as you use B mode intelligently.

City stop/start just needs to avoid harsh acceleration every time the traffic moves. Don't worry about an annoyed follower - just slowly creep along and try to time it so that you don't need to stop as the car in front moves off while you are closing the gap. With occasional speed-ups if that gap becomes too long of course. Feather the throttle and range will be as good.
 

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Hi Paul,

Welcome to the forum; i hope that you've got the 'EV grin' - driving the Leaf is a great experience.

As mention by the previous response, you battery is 6 years old (unless replaced; expensive). and thus will have a lower capacity than new. The first 'health' bar is lost at around 85%. If you are interested in highly detailed information on your battery health, you can use LeafSpy and an OBD2 'dongle' to access the information directly from the car. If you go this route, you may find that the actual amount of charge are different to what's on the dash - but Leafspy takes the data direct from the car, and what you see it what you have...

In terms of why you may see different miles/Kw, there can be many reasons. Firstly, using the heater and AC drain the battery - and more if you have the 'old' heater, versus the newer 'heat pump' (not sure which it would be on a 2014). Also driving in the wet makes a difference, and ambient temperature affects it (batteries perform better in the warm - but excess heat kills them). In older Leafs, the charge remaining bars are somewhat 'adjusted' so that the correlation between miles and Kw isn't linear (or equal) at the 'top' versus 'bottom' of the charge range - though this might only relate to pre-2013 models. Thus, your 'percentage' data may be somewhat distorted depending on whether your figures were derived from 100% SoC or 20% SoC.

One thing to note is that you don't want to leave your car sitting about at 100% charge, or do fast multi-rapid charge trips where the battery gets hot. Both of these are best avoided to preserve the performance of the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I checked your chart data and the total shows that over 121.7 miles you used 146% of battery energy. That is 0.83 miles per % and falls into my own rule of thumb calculations and also give a small margin of miles to cover for a charger not working.
Thanks, and yes on average the consumption seems to be reasonable. I thought it might be a little better than this as the weather is mild at present - especially when looking at the EV database figures - but probably a little unrealistic to expect to achieve these figures even under the best conditions and when the car is 6 years old.

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That’s the thing it’s 6 years old, also I think those figures are a bit on the high side anyway.
 

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I take it you have heaters off, air con off and have tyres slightly overinflated to give best range?

Driving style plays the biggest factor I find, how many balls do you tend to light up when accelerating, do you use lots of regen rather than coast?
 

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Also I find the miles per % varies dependent on soc, the best way to test your range is to drive as far as you can from 100% to vlbw and see what your total is, then you’ll be more confident in what you can realistically do, and how the car behaves at all charge levels
 

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In older Leafs, the charge remaining bars are somewhat 'adjusted' so that the correlation between miles and Kw isn't linear (or equal) at the 'top' versus 'bottom' of the charge range - though this might only relate to pre-2013 models. Thus, your 'percentage' data may be somewhat distorted depending on whether your figures were derived from 100% SoC or 20% SoC.
Thanks for the tips. This point might explain why I see variable consumption on the same route - starting with different battery charges (plus differences in conditions, style etc).
 

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Yep, no heater and no AC. Need to check the tyres though. I never go beyond 3 balls when accelerating and try and use the B mode on top of Eco when braking to maximise regen.
 

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I take it you have heaters off, air con off and have tyres slightly overinflated to give best range?

Driving style plays the biggest factor I find, how many balls do you tend to light up when accelerating, do you use lots of regen rather than coast?
Yep, no heater and no AC. Need to check the tyres though. I never go beyond 3 balls when accelerating and try and use the B mode on top of Eco when braking to maximise regen.
 

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That’s the thing it’s 6 years old, also I think those figures are a bit on the high side anyway.
Yes, I'm beginning to see that...seems a bit over-optimistic to get almost 125 miles unless downhill all the way!
 

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Thanks, and yes on average the consumption seems to be reasonable. I thought it might be a little better than this as the weather is mild at present - especially when looking at the EV database figures - but probably a little unrealistic to expect to achieve these figures even under the best conditions and when the car is 6 years old.
A Leaf 24 will not see much more than 85 reliable miles in spring and summer and more like 60 to 70 usable miles through winter months. I forgot to mention that I used 7 miles per 10% in winter and 8 miles per 10% in warmer conditions. And that was in a new car with zero battery degradation. You may need to work on 7 and 6 miles to avoid embarrassment if travelling towards an empty battery.
 

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I notice the table above showing the expected ranges has some interesting small print. Their 'worst case' cold weather data is based on -10°C temperatures with heating on apparently. And they think they'll get 80 city miles in a new 24kWh LEAF? I call BS on that. Its even less achievable than the 125 summer miles claim imo.

I get the impression that this was done in a lab somewhere and is just as unrealistic as the old NEDC figures that manufacturers used to come up with.

OP - What is your daily usage like in terms of mileage? Hopefully you've not been misled into buying something that's not really suitable for your needs, as it looks like you were expecting a fair bit more than you're getting out of your LEAF at the moment, and as mentioned already that will only get worse as winter comes.
 

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Thanks for the tips. This point might explain why I see variable consumption on the same route - starting with different battery charges (plus differences in conditions, style etc).
Yep, i've a 2012 Leaf with a battery at 78% SoH and have found the GOM and battery indicator to be a poor reflection of what charge is in the battery.

If you want to be super-techy, then GIDs is the 'preferred' use of energy - but you'll need Leafspy to see how many GIDs your battery can hold (drops as it ages) or how many are available to use. I'm also hoping to source a 'true and accurate' meter that permanently displays the amount of usable charge remaining in the battery (a WattsLeft meter). For older cars, these might be handy as they only manage shorter distances between charges, and you spend a higher proportion of time wondering how close you are to running out (if you drive longer distances or just like to run the battery low - not particularly advisable...).
 

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A Leaf 24 will not see much more than 85 reliable miles in spring and summer and more like 60 to 70 usable miles through winter months. I forgot to mention that I used 7 miles per 10% in winter and 8 miles per 10% in warmer conditions. And that was in a new car with zero battery degradation. You may need to work on 7 and 6 miles to avoid embarrassment if travelling towards an empty battery.
Thanks, that's really useful to know and good advice. I've already suffered the embarrassment once in my life of filling a petrol car with diesel and needing a tow home 200 miles...
 

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OP - What is your daily usage like in terms of mileage? Hopefully you've not been misled into buying something that's not really suitable for your needs, as it looks like you were expecting a fair bit more than you're getting out of your LEAF at the moment, and as mentioned already that will only get worse as winter comes.
Under lockdown my daily commute is up the stairs to my home office, so I'm only taking the car out for fun in the evenings and weekends (because it really is a joy to drive). When I bought the car I had in mind around 70 miles on a full charge, so I'm content overall, but based on the EV database figures (which as you say seem questionable) I thought I might get slightly higher from city driving, but seems it actually falls. What the replies have mostly suggested is that the range I'm experiencing seems pretty normal for a 6 year old batt with 24 kWh capacity under the driving conditions I'm describing, which is reassuring.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
7 - if you haven't already, sign up for Nissan you+ and Carwings and get all the info and logins set up - plenty of apps link up and remote air con heating etc is a godsend. I love it.
Brilliant, thanks so much! The one tip of yours I'm struggling with is #7 - I can't seem to get the app (and not even sure which one, as there are two and neither called 'Carwings') to communicate with the car. Any ideas?
 

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Brilliant, thanks so much! The one tip of yours I'm struggling with is #7 - I can't seem to get the app (and not even sure which one, as there are two and neither called 'Carwings') to communicate with the car. Any ideas?
Hi sorry my account got blocked so I couldn't reply!

If your leaf is older than 2015 you need to register for a couple of different things

I would spend another half hour posting how to do it but it seems that got me blocked so I'll just say if you email Nissan's customer services they are brilliant and will take you through the process :)
 
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