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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
a). Recently got our first EV and planning to order an 'ohme Commando' charge cable. I assume that I have to order the one with 'Type 1' ?
b). Do I need a converter to use at Public charge points (such as pod points at Tescos) ?
Thanks in advance
 

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The 24kWh leaf is Type 1.

Normal charge points require a type 2, so you should have a cable that plugs into the type 1 on the car and presents a type 2 to charge point. This could be 16 amp or 32 amp depending on the charger in the car - 3.3kW was standard, but some had the 6.6kW option. The charging screen should show two entries if you have the 6.6kW option. A 32 amp cable would do either fine.

The car would have come with only one of the two cables - either type 1 to type 2, or 13 amp plug 'granny' cable.
 

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Hi
a). Recently got our first EV and planning to order an 'ohme Commando' charge cable. I assume that I have to order the one with 'Type 1' ?
b). Do I need a converter to use at Public charge points (such as pod points at Tescos) ?
Thanks in advance
Maybe of interest to you but the ohme commando is available for £199 to customers of Octopus energy.

Ive recently made the switch to Octopus Go and now charge my leaf for 4 hours over night at a reduced rate of 5p per kWh.

Happy to supply a referral link for £50 cashback each.

Welcome to EV ownership, I'm one month in with my 2015 leaf 24kw and love it!
 

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Hi
a). Recently got our first EV and planning to order an 'ohme Commando' charge cable. I assume that I have to order the one with 'Type 1' ?
b). Do I need a converter to use at Public charge points (such as pod points at Tescos) ?
Thanks in advance
The answers above are correct, but as ever nothing is straightforward.

If you buy an Ohme lead with a type 1 connector then you are likely to have a problem in a few years time when you buy a newer EV as all now come with a type 2 connector. Strictly it is against the design codes but a number of people use converter plugs to change from type 2 to type 1. Alternatively it is possible to change the plug itself at a future date if you are sufficiently handy.

Most public charge points are type 2 sockets and require a lead that connects to it to the car - effectively a type 2 to type 1. Normally these are designed not to connect multiple leads together so it probably will not "extend" a type 2 Ohme to your type 1 car.

There are some Rapid chargers that also have a type 2 AC connector, but this will not fit to your type 1 car. These are not supposed to be used with adapters.

So in summary, what you buy now may be obsolete in a relatively short time, so ensure that you get value from it in the time that you have it or have a plan to convert it to something that you can use.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe of interest to you but the ohme commando is available for £199 to customers of Octopus energy.

Ive recently made the switch to Octopus Go and now charge my leaf for 4 hours over night at a reduced rate of 5p per kWh.

Happy to supply a referral link for £50 cashback each.

Welcome to EV ownership, I'm one month in with my 2015 leaf 24kw and love it!
Hi Thanks. I am already an Octopus customer so apologies on referral:). Do you have both 3.3K and 6.6K onboard charging options?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The answers above are correct, but as ever nothing is straightforward.

If you buy an Ohme lead with a type 1 connector then you are likely to have a problem in a few years time when you buy a newer EV as all now come with a type 2 connector. Strictly it is against the design codes but a number of people use converter plugs to change from type 2 to type 1. Alternatively it is possible to change the plug itself at a future date if you are sufficiently handy.

Most public charge points are type 2 sockets and require a lead that connects to it to the car - effectively a type 2 to type 1. Normally these are designed not to connect multiple leads together so it probably will not "extend" a type 2 Ohme to your type 1 car.

There are some Rapid chargers that also have a type 2 AC connector, but this will not fit to your type 1 car. These are not supposed to be used with adapters.

So in summary, what you buy now may be obsolete in a relatively short time, so ensure that you get value from it in the time that you have it or have a plan to convert it to something that you can use.
Hi, Thanks. Can you convert the onboard Type-1 to Type-2 connector?
 

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Hi, Thanks. Can you convert the onboard Type-1 to Type-2 connector?
No, not without much engineering. In Type 1, the cable locking is handled by the cable; in Type 2, by the car. This means there would be logic changes required in the car to make it work. Not at all straightforward, although of course, like most other things, it could be done if you really really wanted to. Put bluntly, it would be easier to buy a different car.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No, not without much engineering. In Type 1, the cable locking is handled by the cable; in Type 2, by the car. This means there would be logic changes required in the car to make it work. Not at all straightforward, although of course, like most other things, it could be done if you really really wanted to. Put bluntly, it would be easier to buy a different car.
Thanks and Appreciated. I think best option is to use a Type1 > Type 2 Converter
 

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Hi Thanks. I am already an Octopus customer so apologies on referral:). Do you have both 3.3K and 6.6K onboard charging options?
My Leaf only has the 3.3k charger onboard and currently charging it off the granny charging plug, which I believe is around 2.5kw. Im able to add around 5 bars or 50% charge overnight with the 4 hours off peak with octopus. Given the current lockdown I find the 4 hours is enough most days or Im able to catch up to 100% through the week.

I have a type 2 to type 1 lead, so that I am able to charge the car at public charge points. Around £100 new but many used on eBay. But 90% of charging done at home, although I have used the chademo rapid chargers whilst on longer days out.

I've only had the car around 1-2months, so currently in the market for a wall socket. Im an electrician by trade and have recently completed the EV charging course. Waiting for my certs to come back so I can become a registered installer and eligible to install under the grant scheme.

Im personally looking at installing a type 1 tethered wall charger. I have considered installing a type 2 outlet and using my type 1-2 lead but seems a hassle each time charging to get the lead out etc. I intend on keeping the leaf 2-3years if not longer and the way the technology is moving, if I opted to install a type 2 outlet now to future proof for the next ev car I feel it will be out dated when the time comes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My Leaf only has the 3.3k charger onboard and currently charging it off the granny charging plug, which I believe is around 2.5kw. Im able to add around 5 bars or 50% charge overnight with the 4 hours off peak with octopus. Given the current lockdown I find the 4 hours is enough most days or Im able to catch up to 100% through the week.

I have a type 2 to type 1 lead, so that I am able to charge the car at public charge points. Around £100 new but many used on eBay. But 90% of charging done at home, although I have used the chademo rapid chargers whilst on longer days out.

I've only had the car around 1-2months, so currently in the market for a wall socket. Im an electrician by trade and have recently completed the EV charging course. Waiting for my certs to come back so I can become a registered installer and eligible to install under the grant scheme.

Im personally looking at installing a type 1 tethered wall charger. I have considered installing a type 2 outlet and using my type 1-2 lead but seems a hassle each time charging to get it the lead out etc. I intend on keeping the leaf 2-3years if not longer and the way the technology is moving, if I opted to install a type 2 outlet now to future proof for the next ev car I feel it will be out dated when the time comes.
Thanks. I got the car a week ago and so far love it. Still trial and error on getting the best on milage and keep battery healthy. This is our second car which I mostly (if not only) use for the school run. So even in an ideal year, car will not be in use much for about 3-4 months during school holidays. Means I am Ok with it than changing to a one with larger battery at higher price. I possibly buy the Octopus-Ohme Type-2 Cable and add a converter. Going to check this with Ohme team and will share the update here
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Also if I only have 3.3kw onboard charger, does it make any difference to the charge time/cost if I use 'Commando + Ohme Cable' or Granny Cable charger? (assuming I am with Octopus Energy)
 

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Also if I only have 3.3kw onboard charger, does it make any difference to the charge time/cost if I use 'Commando + Ohme Cable' or Granny Cable charger? (assuming I am with Octopus Energy)
Once octopus energy is setup you can switch to one of their ev friendly tariffs.

Octopus go gives you 4 hours off peak at 5 per per kWh.
Octopus go+ gives you 5 hours off peak

Having the onboard 3.3kw charger means the car at home can only receive 3.3kw roughly 15p per hour.

You can set the ohme lead to charge the car off peak. Although you can also set a timed charge inside the car, which is how I currently have it setup.

Having the 3.6 charger just means you charge at a slower rate and receive less charge over the 6.6
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Once octopus energy is setup you can switch to one of their ev friendly tariffs.

Octopus go gives you 4 hours off peak at 5 per per kWh.
Octopus go+ gives you 5 hours off peak

Having the onboard 3.3kw charger means the car at home can only receive 3.3kw roughly 15p per hour.

You can set the ohme lead to charge the car off peak. Although you can also set a timed charge inside the car, which is how I currently have it setup.

Having the 3.6 charger just means you charge at a slower rate and receive less charge over the 6.6
Thanks. So with Octopus Go/Go+ there is no added benefit from Ohme Cable compared to 3-pin Cable at home?
 

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Thanks. So with Octopus Go/Go+ there is no added benefit from Ohme Cable compared to 3-pin Cable at home?
If you are using an off peak tariff with the same time slot each day, it’s easy to setup timed charging in the car.

Octopus also offer an Agile tariff so the price constantly moves. Low over night and off peak etc but higher during peak hours. On the agile tariff the ohme lead would be beneficial as you can set the car to only charge once the tariff is below 10p or 5p etc.

The advantage of a home charger over the standard 3 pin plug would be safety and slightly more capacity.

The 3 pin charger can charge at 2.3kw, so your not making full use of the 3.6kw on board charger.

A domestic 3 pin plug is not really designed for a continuous 10amp load for the duration of charge and there has been issues with burnt sockets, potential fire risks etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you are using an off peak tariff with the same time slot each day, it’s easy to setup timed charging in the car.

Octopus also offer an Agile tariff so the price constantly moves. Low over night and off peak etc but higher during peak hours. On the agile tariff the ohme lead would be beneficial as you can set the car to only charge once the tariff is below 10p or 5p etc.

The advantage of a home charger over the standard 3 pin plug would be safety and slightly more capacity.

The 3 pin charger can charge at 2.3kw, so your not making full use of the 3.6kw on board charger.

A domestic 3 pin plug is not really designed for a continuous 10amp load for the duration of charge and there has been issues with burnt sockets, potential fire risks etc.
Thanks and you explained all I wanted to know.
 
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