Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
NISSAN LEAF 62Kwh
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Japan: Nissan Sold 500,000 e-Power Cars, But Only 150,000 LEAFs


The company quickly spreads its series-hybrid tech to more models, making it "a key pillar of its electrification strategy."


Japan: Nissan Sold 500,000 e-Power Cars, But Only 150,000 LEAFs (insideevs.com)



“The all-electric Nissan Ariya is coming too, but it's the only new BEV we heard of so far from Nissan, which makes an impression that the main focus is on the e-Power.”

“Nissan e-Power
With the series-hybrid setup, Nissan probably will be able to significantly lower its average emission of new cars and gain some time.

It's actually not a bad idea, as the e-Power cars should drive much better than the conventional ones.” (Quote from Inside evs)

Will the LEAF be replaced in the short to medium term? - It doesn't look like it.

On a personal point of view, I don't like hybrids, for me, the driver for going full EV was doing away with a polluting ICE engine - the oil changes - exhaust pipes etc. so for me NISSAN have lost their direction.

However I am pragmatic enough to realise that the vast majority of the motoring public are not enthusiastic to go straight to and EV and the hybrid does offer that bridge.

Probably the "NISSAN e-Power" system is one of the better hybrid setups.

Will NISSAN find themselves outside the EV equation - in the long term? and ultimately regret this decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Japan: Nissan Sold 500,000 e-Power Cars, But Only 150,000 LEAFs


The company quickly spreads its series-hybrid tech to more models, making it "a key pillar of its electrification strategy."


Japan: Nissan Sold 500,000 e-Power Cars, But Only 150,000 LEAFs (insideevs.com)



“The all-electric Nissan Ariya is coming too, but it's the only new BEV we heard of so far from Nissan, which makes an impression that the main focus is on the e-Power.”

“Nissan e-Power
With the series-hybrid setup, Nissan probably will be able to significantly lower its average emission of new cars and gain some time.

It's actually not a bad idea, as the e-Power cars should drive much better than the conventional ones.” (Quote from Inside evs)

Will the LEAF be replaced in the short to medium term? - It doesn't look like it.

On a personal point of view, I don't like hybrids, for me, the driver for going full EV was doing away with a polluting ICE engine - the oil changes - exhaust pipes etc. so for me NISSAN have lost their direction.

However I am pragmatic enough to realise that the vast majority of the motoring public are not enthusiastic to go straight to and EV and the hybrid does offer that bridge.

Probably the "NISSAN e-Power" system is one of the better hybrid setups.

Will NISSAN find themselves outside the EV equation - in the long term? and ultimately regret this decision.
Isn’t there going to be an EV Juke announced soon, or is it just a rumour?
 

·
Registered
Two Nissan Leaf e+
Joined
·
233 Posts
Nissan have a good track record with BEVs so this e-power thing does seem a backward step. Very Toyota-ish in style actually though at least they're not calling it a self charging hybrid.

I was watching the Champions League the other night and taken by the amount of big advertising Nissan are doing with the Leaf. I'm very pleased that they're not quietly dropping the Leaf (like quite a few 'experts' love to suggest on these fora) as it's a great car and we now own two. But this e-power thing does seem like mixed messaging. I've noticed the Leaf sells better here in the UK than in Japan and that one of the biggest sellers across there is the ICE Note so perhaps the hybrid focus is to satisfy the home market.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
Nissan have a couple of new EVs on the way so to suggest they are going to move away from EV is ridiculous frankly. Hybrids are a very short term bet. Soon they will cost more to make than pure electric plus the climate is hostile in most G7 economies against non pure EVs.

When you see a company like VW investing 30 billion in EVs and planning on completely phasing out ICE you can see the direction of travel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,657 Posts
The EU/UK tax and grant treatment will make it hard for the e-Power Qashqai to succeed. Serial hybrids don't do well on the WLTP test due to higher speed testing than in native Japan. e-Power may be a short term solution but won't help Nissan meet emission targets longer term.

The reality is that Nissan will probably disappear from Europe by 2035 although some Renault built cars might be sold as Nissan.

 
  • Like
Reactions: dk6780

·
Registered
2021 Tesla Model 3 LR
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
Nissan is a business and needs to make a profit. Right now they can’t give up making ICE vehicles because that’s still what the market demands. Same for any legacy manufacturers. Nissan have had a BEV strategy longer than most and as a business I’m sure it’s playing an ever increasing role in their plan as the market shifts.
 

·
Leaf lover
Joined
·
4,969 Posts
We have had many debates here on speakev about the merits of series hybrids and for me the issue was very simplistic, the first fundamental step in the transition to us all driving electric one day was for all the auto makers to accept that electric motors should be the only thing actually turning the wheels.
Had Toyota switched from parallel to series hybrids at the start of this century we would have had an ev evolution. Instead all the legacy auto makers have watched and hoped Tesla would fail but they haven't and we thankfully (I have progressed from Leaf to i3 rex to model 3) now are in the midst of an ev revolution.
An revolutions are chaotic.
Are Nissan doing the right thing? Without a detailed knowledge of the world car market who can say but for me if Nissan has fully accepted that only electric motors should now be turning the wheels of all their vehicles (regardless of battery size and whether it is grid fill or petrol fill or both) they are on the right road.
 

·
Registered
2021 Tesla Model 3 LR
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
We have had many debates here on speakev about the merits of series hybrids and for me the issue was very simplistic, the first fundamental step in the transition to us all driving electric one day was for all the auto makers to accept that electric motors should be the only thing actually turning the wheels.
Had Toyota switched from parallel to series hybrids at the start of this century we would have had an ev evolution. Instead all the legacy auto makers have watched and hoped Tesla would fail but they haven't and we thankfully (I have progressed from Leaf to i3 rex to model 3) now are in the midst of an ev revolution.
An revolutions are chaotic.
Are Nissan doing the right thing? Without a detailed knowledge of the world car market who can say but for me if Nissan has fully accepted that only electric motors should now be turning the wheels of all their vehicles (regardless of battery size and whether it is grid fill or petrol fill or both) they are on the right road.
Agreed. I’m only just taking the final step to full EV having driven parallel and series hybrids as things have evolved to the point where BEVs have the range I need to become a main work and family car.I agree that in hindsight things could have moved much quicker if some of the big manufacturers had been braver, but hopefully we’re not far from tipping point now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,613 Posts
I'd rather hoped that having Mitsi in the group would result in a derivative of the GKN Outlander gearbox being added to e-drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
Nissan's problem is they lost 3 billion last year. It costs a lot of money to develope new vehicles EV or otherwise.

They simply cannot afford to launch a lot of pure EV at the moment. So they are developing Hybrids on their existing platforms as a stop gap and drip feeding new EVs to the market.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,596 Posts
...the first fundamental step in the transition to us all driving electric one day was for all the auto makers to accept that electric motors should be the only thing actually turning the wheels....if Nissan has fully accepted that only electric motors should now be turning the wheels of all their vehicles (regardless of battery size and whether it is grid fill or petrol fill or both) they are on the right road.
You mean like diesel electric locomotives and huge container ships have been doing for decades?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
367 Posts
Hybrid cars are not cheap to build either: Electric motors + generator or ICE + battery.

I think that Nissan has to bring out more BEV’s but they need to bring progress while maintaining consistency with the existing line-up.

I think that bidirectional charging capability should be maintained because this is happening right now.
Pitch the BEV’s as a competitor to home batteries, it’s an easy sell.

Ideally, instead of Chademo + type 2 > Chademo + CCS. Chademo as back up fast charging and bidirectional, CCS for type 2 and fast charging.

CCS won t be bidirectionaln until 2025, this is the gap in the market.

A Juke sized BEV is a smart choice.
But they need to keep the Leaf and the E-NV200 and do a simple update/facelift on those to align with the SUV’s, offer more battery options below 40kWh on the Leaf for the low budget grant-centric market.

Perhaps also a Micra based on the Zoe but with the guts of a Leaf.
 

·
Leaf lover
Joined
·
4,969 Posts
You mean like diesel electric locomotives and huge container ships have been doing for decades?
Yes but I have no knowledge of how such transport match the needs of the variable controls we associate with road transport.
The battery in an ev is used to provide the flexibility of power needed, a shortage puffer for the regen energy and then main storage ie the fuel tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,613 Posts
I'd guess that this a move to ensure that all their petrol cars can transition to being PHEV so they can go beyond the 2030 deadline.

They can only introduce EVs as they develop completely new EV only platforms, which the three companies will be doing as fast as they can.
 

·
Registered
NISSAN LEAF 62Kwh
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
When NISSAN first started the development of electric vehicle (Renault also as part of that Group) they were subsidised to so by Government Grants. Otherwise they would not have bothered as financially there was just loses and zero profits.

Creating something from the ground up, is difficult with the battery technology at the time, in it's infancy and zero vehicle charging infrastructure. When the vehicles were ready, they were very expensive due to the research and development, and a desire to break even, range of the vehicle also a practical problem. This resulted in nobody buying the vehicles and the only way to sell them was to offer them on stupidly cheap leasing deals.

Now, 10 years on, Electric vehicles are becoming more widely accepted, this being helped and driven by Government Environment Policy, and the plain simple fact EV's are just nicer to drive. It seems a real shame that after doing all the early hard work, NISSAN do not have the conviction to give up making Internal Combustion Engines (Both Petrol and Diesel).

NISSAN are not alone, all the legacy car manufacturers are desperately trying to hang on to the ICE, they have spent so much on development and production tooling over the years. Also to stop the production of the ICE will create job losses, this especially unpalatable to company's like NISSAN, that make up a vast amount of the Japanese economy.

These Legacy vehicle manufacturers really now need to "wake up and smell the coffee" the future is electric or what ever, but is certainly not ICE.

To emphasis how thing are changing, I was reading the Motoring Column in this mornings paper, the vehicle being reviewed was a BMW M4 Competition - 2 door Coupe - Price: £73,300 - Engine 3.0 litre 6 Cylinder, 503bhp - 0-60 = 3.8 seconds - Fuel Consumption 27.7 mpg - Co2 emissions 234g/km.

The reviewer did a thorough review and ended by saying "While driving it, I had the thought that probably this was the last M4 that I would test that wasn't fully electric or at least a plug-in hybrid
I suspect there will be a lot of performance car fans who will swallow the price of this motor in the knowledge that it is a last hurrah - and that it will be kept for a long time."

I think that sums up nicely the way things are heading -
 

·
Leaf lover
Joined
·
4,969 Posts
"Engine 3.0 litre 6 Cylinder, 503bhp" @GOSPORT DAVE the ICE spec has understandably dominated the auto industry and us drivers and after a century of development it now hampers both the legacy auto makers and today's drivers.

When I had a test drive in my lovely blue Leaf in 2011 it was magic to me. I had spent the whole year finding out what I could about ev and also wanting a new vehicle. The Leaf suited my needs, lot of miles but close to home, 17k/year.
I scoffed at needing a rex when I saw the BMW i3, then in 2016 leased one which we now own outright.
And my experience and absorption into the ev world made me realise that whilst most see the transition in terms of batteries and zero emissions, the real story is about what is actually turning the wheels and who controls the pace of the transition.
I spoke of Toyota earlier and how things could have been had they switched from parallel to series hybrids. Many ev enthusiasts have been strongly against Toyota's HFC efforts but the irony is that the Mirai is a series hybrid and that systems requires a whole new charging infrastructure and much the same upheaval to the existing industry and us drivers. The big different factor in that change is the part the existing fuel industry would play so staying hand in hand with them I suspect meant Toyota could stay in control of the transition
My point in saying this is that once the industry and today's drivers let go of the notion that it is all about getting rid of the ICE and see that the transition is really all about what is actually turning the wheels then it might help understand what companies like Nissan are dealing with.
 

·
Registered
Renault Zoe ZE50 GT-Line Rapid Charge
Joined
·
4,133 Posts
CCS won t be bidirectional until 2025, this is the gap in the market.
VW have said their MEB platform will be bidirectional from next year.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top