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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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It’s swings and roundabouts, and having anything but brand new unworn tyres on all four wheels is a safety trade off compromise. Ideally, we would all replace all four tyres say every 10K miles, but we don’t, and never will. So we have to compromise.

I fully accept that if you throw a car around on extreme wet aqua planing skid pan conditions then yes worn rear tyres will be likely to cause tail slide spin out. No argument. However, that is just one reduced safety effect of having a pair of worn out tyres.

Please consider some other scenarios, when tge fronts are worn, especially straight line emergency braking when a child runs out in front or similar. In that scenario almost all the stopping power is via the front wheels as the weight transfers to the front tyres (true with any car). You need plenty of grip on the front tyres to minimise the stopping distance. Having worn tyres on the front will increase the stopping distance, especially in the wet. That scenario could also kill.

Another consideration is winter traction with a front wheel drive car. To simply get going up a slight hill in icy snow you need good tyres on the front (not worn ones) and also to improve winter braking and hill descending. You also need good tyres on the front in order to steer in winter conditions. Front wheel skids on snow are no joke when you turn the steering wheel but it just keeps going straight!

In my Prius experience the rear tyres wear so extremealy little that they were virtually like new even when the fronts have totally had it, so rotating is unnecessary IMHO. Maybe after two sets of fronts I might rotate them then but likely they would still be almost like new regarding tread depth. However rubber ageing starts to become an issue eventually. Peter
 

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It’s swings and roundabouts, and having anything but brand new unworn tyres on all four wheels is a safety trade off compromise. Ideally, we would all replace all four tyres say every 10K miles, but we don’t, and never will. So we have to compromise.

I fully accept that if you throw a car around on extreme wet aqua planing skid pan conditions then yes worn rear tyres will be likely to cause tail slide spin out. No argument. However, that is just one reduced safety effect of having a pair of worn out tyres.

Please consider some other scenarios, when tge fronts are worn, especially straight line emergency braking when a child runs out in front or similar. In that scenario almost all the stopping power is via the front wheels as the weight transfers to the front tyres (true with any car). You need plenty of grip on the front tyres to minimise the stopping distance. Having worn tyres on the front will increase the stopping distance, especially in the wet. That scenario could also kill.

Another consideration is winter traction with a front wheel drive car. To simply get going up a slight hill in icy snow you need good tyres on the front (not worn ones) and also to improve winter braking and hill descending. You also need good tyres on the front in order to steer in winter conditions. Front wheel skids on snow are no joke when you turn the steering wheel but it just keeps going straight!

In my Prius experience the rear tyres wear so extremealy little that they were virtually like new even when the fronts have totally had it, so rotating is unnecessary IMHO. Maybe after two sets of fronts I might rotate them then but likely they would still be almost like new regarding tread depth. However rubber ageing starts to become an issue eventually. Peter
Agree with every single one of your points, many thanks for taking the time to reply.
 

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2021 Citroën ë-C4 Shine Plus
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I once had a Citroën C5 estate to which I fitted a pair of snow socks to the front (driving) wheels, when we had a good dumping of snow.

That C5 would then go places where my previous C-Crosser (re-badged Outlander) 4WD would have got stuck on normal tyres.

Front wheel grip in the real world is more important to me than some skid-pan antics that would suggest the opposite.
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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The bible on tyres is your vehicle handbook. This overrides tyre manufacturers covering their backs, and all social media sources.
In any case you should reconsider whether you ought to be driving if you are unable to tell whether the handling has been adversely affected by the tyres.
 

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Primacy 3 on my B250e lasted 18k miles (225/50x17), and Primacy 3 on my ZSEV (215/50x17) are at 23k miles with another 2-3k miles before they need replaced.

I don't drive like a nun.
 

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I've had my car for a year and have done some 13k km with it (8k miles). I am a relaxed driver and don't do fast accelerations or high speed motorway.

Even though the tyres are not worn, the front tyres have visibly a lot less profile on them than the rear tyres. I have not measured the depth, but I do not think I would see this much difference on any other car I had. My previous car was a Skoda Octavia and the front tyres on that one lasted me some 70k km. The way it's looking the Primacy 3 on my e-Niro will last maybe 25k or 30k km max. Does that sound reasonable? It's quite on the low end for me.
I swapped my wheels front to rear at 12,000 miles when the front tyres were down to about 3.1mm and the rear 5mm. Projecting the same wear rate forward I'm hoping all four should be down to around 2mm by maybe 25,000 miles. I don't think that's so bad for a heavy car with the front wheels doing all the work, especially as the tyres started out with only 6mm. This video might be of interest, though the particular tyres discussed are not relevant to the e-Niro.
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020 64kwh
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I do find it odd that, as far as I can tell, no-one makes an 215/55R17 EV-specific tyre.

Especially considering how many Niro/Kona/Soul EVs are about.

At the very least, you'd have thought the Korean Hankook/Kumho group might have worked on one in partnership with Kia group.

Seems a massive missed opportunity, if there are potential range gains they could use in their marketing.

Considering how mind bogglingly large a selection of tyre types/Sizes Michelin supply, did they not research common EV tyre sizes before speccing their various EV tyres in such a limited range of sizes?

Would be interesting for someone to analyse the howmanyleft data and work out what are the most common sizes of tyres actually fitted to EVs.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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I do find it odd that, as far as I can tell, no-one makes an 215/55R17 EV-specific tyre.

Especially considering how many Niro/Kona/Soul EVs are about.

At the very least, you'd have thought the Korean Hankook/Kumho group might have worked on one in partnership with Kia group.

Seems a massive missed opportunity, if there are potential range gains they could use in their marketing.

Considering how mind bogglingly large a selection of tyre types/Sizes Michelin supply, did they not research common EV tyre sizes before speccing their various EV tyres in such a limited range of sizes?

Would be interesting for someone to analyse the howmanyleft data and work out what are the most common sizes of tyres actually fitted to EVs.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
Not one for my Leaf either - 215/50/17
 

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I swapped my wheels front to rear at 12,000 miles when the front tyres were down to about 3.1mm and the rear 5mm. Projecting the same wear rate forward I'm hoping all four should be down to around 2mm by maybe 25,000 miles. I don't think that's so bad for a heavy car with the front wheels doing all the work, especially as the tyres started out with only 6mm. This video might be of interest, though the particular tyres discussed are not relevant to the e-Niro.
So why didn’t you wait till the 3m, tyres were at 2, pull the (still 5mm or maybe 4.tmm) tyres to the front and put new ones on the back? You wouldn’t “get through” tyres any quicker, but it would be way safer.

What you did means you’d have 5mm on the front and 3.1mm on the back, which in the wet would be very dangerous, for no gain?
 

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So why didn’t you wait till the 3m, tyres were at 2, pull the (still 5mm or maybe 4.tmm) tyres to the front and put new ones on the back? You wouldn’t “get through” tyres any quicker, but it would be way safer.

What you did means you’d have 5mm on the front and 3.1mm on the back, which in the wet would be very dangerous, for no gain?
Essentially because I want to replace all four at once, possibly with something different. Or not have to replace any if I swap the car before then. Since Michelin tyres are designed to perform just as safely as new right down to the legal limit of 1.6mm, I can't see that 3mm at the rear is of any concern at all. In any case, the front tyres will wear down quicker and will most likely end up with less tread than the rears by the time the drainage capability of the the tyres is remotely compromised.
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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So why didn’t you wait till the 3m, tyres were at 2, pull the (still 5mm or maybe 4.tmm) tyres to the front and put new ones on the back? You wouldn’t “get through” tyres any quicker, but it would be way safer.

What you did means you’d have 5mm on the front and 3.1mm on the back, which in the wet would be very dangerous, for no gain?
You're still spouting the same rubbish about having less tread on the rear being 'very dangerous'.

Look, if this was the case, not only would it be highlighted in the vehicle handbook, but there would also be a clause in your insurance schedule requiring you to keep the tyres with most tread on the rear.
 

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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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TBH the one major compelling reason to rotate the wheels and tyres, for me, is that in most typical front wheel drive scenarios the fronts wear down fast and get replaced, but the rears don't wear at all and they plain old rot in place and wind up cracked and falling apart. You therefore don't even get to use all that expensive tread before you have to replace them, so rotate them .. and actually get to consume them before they die of old age.
Meanwhile I now have a rear wheel drive I3 with different sized wheels front and rear .. sigh..
 

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And to add to this, rotating the wheels means you even out the damage caused by brake dust to the alloys (assuming you're as lazy as us, and most people, in keeping them clean)...
 

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And to add to this, rotating the wheels means you even out the damage caused by brake dust to the alloys (assuming you're as lazy as us, and most people, in keeping them clean)...
very far down my list of things to do.
In any case, with the right brake pad compound and regenerative braking, dust should be almost non existant on a moderately driven EV.
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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very far down my list of things to do.
In any case, with the right brake pad compound and regenerative braking, dust should be almost non existant on a moderately driven EV.
Don't get any on my Leaf.
 

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very far down my list of things to do.
In any case, with the right brake pad compound and regenerative braking, dust should be almost non existant on a moderately driven EV.
The good news is you don't have to rotate your wheels front-to-back separately from rotating your tyres front-to-back .. ;)
Though I agree, I was just adding it as another angle. I do get some brake dust on my i3 but it's a miniscule amount compared to non-EVs. To be honest I'm aware that the disks don't get used much and are likely to rust and pit over time, so I deliberately create opportunities to give them a polish from time to time.
 

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And to add to this, rotating the wheels means you even out the damage caused by brake dust to the alloys (assuming you're as lazy as us, and most people, in keeping them clean)...
I’ve heard this thing that brake dust damages alloy wheels many times over years. However, I’m not fully convinced it’s real. Is there any reliable science that proves or explains this thing?

IMHO the primary culprit by far is minute protection lacquer damage by grit, stone chips etc, followed by the slow but sure creeping rot caused by saline moisture and air ingress to the metal surface. Winter road salt spreading is the real wheel killer I believe. Peter.
 
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