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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Twelve months have passed since we got the Leaf e+ and I thought I'd share my thoughts about it. Especially so, when quite a lot of competition is around Leaf right now and it is being criticised a lot by many people in the UK (surprisingly not so by US reviewers, but that is for another conversation).
So, the good, the bad and overall thoughts:

THE GOOD
1. Build quality
E+ is my second Leaf. Before that I had a 30kWh Tekhna for 3 years and loved it a lot. I remember collecting it from our Nissan dealer checking everything and trying to find faults in paint or panels alignment, especially as that was the first new car I ever had. I found very, and I do mean very, few faults on 30kWh. Likewise, there were almost none on the e+. The car is very well made, the panels feel sturdy and after 12 months and about 7k miles the cabin has no unwarranted noises. Paint coating is superb throughout.
2. Ride comfort and driving experience
A lot was said about supposedly "unsettled ride" of e+ due to heavier weight and tighter suspension. I disagree. Compared to 30kWh, e+ is a much more balanced car. It feels heavier and it rolls more than 30kWh on bends, but at the same time, it feels better planted on the road, which gives more confidence. It is subjective, but I happen to frequently drive rented cars during work trips and suspension on e+ is definitely no worse than the new A-class Merc or Peugeot 3008. E+ is also much quieter than my old 30kWh Leaf and I would give it an edge over M3, which I had an opportunity to drive for a day. Not that M3 was loud, but I think its suspension is just more sensitive and that adds lower frequencies to road noise.
Regarding the acceleration and power, it is miles away from 30kWh. I was vowed by M3 and e+ is surely not Tesla, but I also never feel that I lack power with e+. Overtaking at 70mph is easy and 0-30mph beats any usual ICE at the traffic lights if I get off Eco. It is not an exciting car in terms of pure acceleration, but I dont do racing and don't care about 0-60mph, so for me that number is neither here nor there, if the car is fast enough for normal circumstances. E+ delivers what I expect.
3. Propilot and driver assist
If there is one area where e+ beats M3 hands down is the usability of driver's assist technology. I was somewhat surprised at how many times did the autopilot disengage during my M3 test drive. That, combined with a few similar reviews from M3 drivers just proved the point: having superior hardware doesn't equate to superior experience. With my e+ I use Propilot everytime it is safe to do so. It is very reliable and, unlike M3, allows several options from speed limiter to full driver assist. In addition, LED signals in wing mirrors are perfect for blind spots when overtaking.
4. Cargo space
It is a hatchback. I can put almost anything realistic in the boot without worrying about dimensions. There are other EVs out there with similar or even larger boots, but I do love Leaf for being a very versatile daily car.
5. Heated steering wheel and all seats
BLISS, especially when preheated in winter No worries about scrubbing windows or wearing gloves while driving.

THE BAD
1. Infotainment and connectivity
We all know that the main screen is greatly underused and somewhat old on Leafs. E+ is much faster than Gen1 of course, with regular online updates, traffic information, Apple/Android car play. However, just as in my opinion "Tesla way" of removing all physical buttons and knobs is extreme (and borderline unsafe), Leaf could use some of that touchscreen functionality on its infotainment screen. For instance, why charging information is not available on the main screen? Why aircon widget cannot be used as a touch control? Also, why can't I see the temperature in the car when the sensor is available? Battery temperature and health anyone? Frustrating...
The Connect app is way better than before, but still is too slow and has limited functionality. Why not give the driver ability to look at cameras at any moment in time? Or to open doors via the app? Technical capacity may or may not be there, but alas, not implemented properly or not thought through.
2. Steering wheel adjustment
No comments. We all know, it doesnt adjust by reach...
3. Not aimed at the car, but at Nissan - service cost
Annual service is only 50£ cheaper than similar service for ICE, but it requires so much less actual work from Nissan. Realistically, it has to be cheaper. Having said that, I have never had any out of order situations with Leaf in all the years of owning both models, so can't complain.
4. Not aimed at the car - lack of 100kW chargers
Any e+ owner will ascertain, there is only a handful of fitting 100kW charges in the UK and, with Ariya ditching CHADEMO, I don't think this network will be growing as fast if at all. It effectively means that full charging speed is rarely achieved.

OVERALL THOUGHTS
The main question is, Would I buy e+ again?
Knowing what I know and if I needed the car right now - YES.
E+ is a great car. Far from perfect, but it fits my lifestyle and I have enjoyed driving it on every trip I took, close and far. Propilot is superb, while drawbacks from infotainment are partially negated by Apple/Android compatibility.
Having said that, I am looking forward to Ariya and, if it comes out the way I hope it will, I will upgrade in a couple of years.
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It's a lovely car. I'd like to get an aftermarket HUD with speed on it like the 30kWh. With the big discounts available it's a very good value long range EV.
 

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Thanks for the summary. It seems very balanced indeed. My only dispute with what you have said is on the perennial lack of 200 amp Chademo charging. The largest charging network in the UK, polar, are building 200 amp chademo units throughout the country in BP forecourts. This will mean that there is a significant expansion in 200amp chademo charging that is happening. This is certainly a faster expansion in 200amp chademo charging than anywhere else in the world (including Japan from what I have read). This certainly means that for cars with chademo the short to medium future is still rosy.

With support for 200amp chademo from one of the largest chargepoint manufacturers ABB, you are starting to see a few 200amp chademo chargers cropping up in Norway, Germany and elsewhere in Europe.

Other car manufacturers are not giving up on Chademo. I was interested to see that xpeng will be selling their European cars with chademo.

Finally, now that the trials of V2G and V2H are either underway or finishing, while there is no agreed standard on how to implement this with CCS or via AC chargers, chademo will certainly remain in demand for the medium future. I can see a large aftermarket for independent garages retrofitting CCS to cars who previously used chademo.

This post has turned into a bit of a longer one then I thought, however reading various posts on the forum everyone seems to think chademo is ‘dead’, however IMO I think this is far from the case.
 

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Having had the 24, the 30 and now the 40, I was pretty convinced that I would get an e+ next. So many thanks to Rod for reinforcing my opinion. There will always be cars with more of something than the Leaf as it is in effect the Ford Focus of the EV world. Generally you measure other EVs in comparison to the Leaf and be convinced that your choice is better, otherwise, buy a Leaf.
 

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Thanks @Rod85 , that's a really good summary. My experience is shorter than yours (although nearly 5000 miles clocked since purchased in early June, how did that happen?) but I agree with your comments.

Adding to your positive comments about driveability, I like the pace that the car has when needed. I'm in eco most of the time but when required I'll burst off the line or into traffic effortlessly; I like to think I break the stereotype of the namby pamby environmentalist electric driver sometimes (although that's maybe just in my head).

Regarding 'the bad', I agree about aspects of the infotainment system (a bit of a cluttered menu, for example), but I generally find it alright. Not knowing the internal cabin temperature is an omission, for sure, and a bit annoying. The steering wheel reach issue is well documented as you say, and something I thought carefully about before buying. I am tall (6'5") so it could be a problem but I genuinely have not found it to be so. It isn't a low seated position, which helps and I also think not having a clutch pedal means the driver can be a bit closer to the wheel comfortably. Whatever it is, I haven't found the steering position uncomfortable and I have done several longer road trips.

Servicing is a bit steep for the amount of work involved, but then it is for all dealership servicing. I accepted this (when choosing between Tesla and Nissan) as the acceptable downside for having more local support if needed. I have also saved just over a hundred pounds by taking out a three year service plan with Bristol Street.

I wish visibility was a bit better (having been more used to a SUV and people carriers previously) as the safety pillars can be a bit blocking. My wife, a more seasoned Nissan driver, says I just have to use the cameras more...

I hope that Chademo isn't on the way out and worry about that a bit, but @Jite , I note your optimism and hope you're right. At the right price I think the Leaf+ is a great car, have told everyone so since I've had it, and appreciate your comments along very similar lines @Rod85 .
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks @Rod85 , that's a really good summary. My experience is shorter than yours (although nearly 5000 miles clocked since purchased in early June, how did that happen?) but I agree with your comments.

Adding to your positive comments about driveability, I like the pace that the car has when needed. I'm in eco most of the time but when required I'll burst off the line or into traffic effortlessly; I like to think I break the stereotype of the namby pamby environmentalist electric driver sometimes (although that's maybe just in my head).

Regarding 'the bad', I agree about aspects of the infotainment system (a bit of a cluttered menu, for example), but I generally find it alright. Not knowing the internal cabin temperature is an omission, for sure, and a bit annoying. The steering wheel reach issue is well documented as you say, and something I thought carefully about before buying. I am tall (6'5") so it could be a problem but I genuinely have not found it to be so. It isn't a low seated position, which helps and I also think not having a clutch pedal means the driver can be a bit closer to the wheel comfortably. Whatever it is, I haven't found the steering position uncomfortable and I have done several longer road trips.

Servicing is a bit steep for the amount of work involved, but then it is for all dealership servicing. I accepted this (when choosing between Tesla and Nissan) as the acceptable downside for having more local support if needed. I have also saved just over a hundred pounds by taking out a three year service plan with Bristol Street.

I wish visibility was a bit better (having been more used to a SUV and people carriers previously) as the safety pillars can be a bit blocking. My wife, a more seasoned Nissan driver, says I just have to use the cameras more...

I hope that Chademo isn't on the way out and worry about that a bit, but @Jite , I note your optimism and hope you're right. At the right price I think the Leaf+ is a great car, have told everyone so since I've had it, and appreciate your comments along very similar lines @Rod85 .
360 cameras are a great asset indeed
 

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The 62KWh is a true 70mph EV, Up to a range of 400 miles in a day.

Driven 280 miles today, all middle lane with the pilot set at 73mph (true 70mph) no hold ups, just a 50mph speed limit on the M27 for 16 miles and 60mph speed limit for 10 miles on the M1 at Northampton.

Really refined drive, Auto steer on most of the way, car really quiet, hardly any road noise, just a bit of wind noise from the head on wind.

Averaged 3.3 miles / Kw - Battery temperature went up to 38c on the second rapid. (After 240 miles)

First charge at 100 miles Cherwell services, took 30Kws in 45 minutes - second charge at Ferry Bridge services, at 240 miles, took 25Kws in 45 minutes. (Couldn’t get more than 40Kws out of the Ecotricity chargers)

On arrival let the battery cool off for 4 hours and charged up to 92% this evening, on the free vend ENGIE charger at Yeadon, all ready to go tomorrow.

At sub £30k, for a new 62Kwh, is a real bargain, and represents good Value when used examples become more plentiful.
 
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