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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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Interesting, but I have to say nowhere close to enough detail about how it actually works to be able to really understand if it's a good idea or not.

How on earth do they know how much electricity the EV is using to be able to charge the EV rate for it?
What about all the other electronics that you can run in the off peak to get cheap rate electricity on other tariffs?
What happens when their app inevitably doesn't work the one time you really need the car charged now?

Presumably this is going to require the user to have a whole bunch of Ovo-specific hardware installed that will not work with any other smart tariff or provider...
 

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I think this would only really work for anyone on Octopus (if you have one of their SMETs 1 Secure meters, they also work with OVO) who has the right sort of smart charger, or in need of a smart charger, but then you are a good £500 notes out of pocket before the get go. Also I just checked out costs to switch to OVO Drive and its 3p more peak per kWh and 7.5p per day more on standing charge, the gas is also almost double what I pay through Octopus for both per kWh and standing charge (although I'm prepared for that hike come December when my fix ends, and you don't need to be dual fuel I guess).
 

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I currently run my washing machine, dehumidifier, on- suite water heater, hot water emersion ( which works out cheaper than gas) and a usb block to charge phones and tablets. Oh and the Dyson.
 

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Interesting, but I have to say nowhere close to enough detail about how it actually works to be able to really understand if it's a good idea or not.

How on earth do they know how much electricity the EV is using to be able to charge the EV rate for it?
What about all the other electronics that you can run in the off peak to get cheap rate electricity on other tariffs?
What happens when their app inevitably doesn't work the one time you really need the car charged now?

Presumably this is going to require the user to have a whole bunch of Ovo-specific hardware installed that will not work with any other smart tariff or provider...
There are more details on the Ovo web site. You need one of their smart chargers (Indra Smart Pro) and have to charge using the app to get the 5p rate - if you use the "boost" option to charge immediately then this will be charged at the full rate. You will initially be charged the full rate for all electricity used and will then get a credit based on the amount of electricity recorded by the charger, so only electricity used for charging will get the 5p rate. I couldn't find details of the standard unit rate or standing charge on the web site.

I have an Indra Smart+ charger (an earlier version of the Smart Pro) and it is way out in its estimate of the amount of electricity used - about 20% less than the actual amount. I hope they'll do better than this for anyone using this tariff.
 

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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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Yeahhh I think I'll stick with what I've got.

More expensive for gas and electricity at base prices, special equipment required at huge cost of installation, entirely reliant on an app to reliably track usage and issue account credits.....that's an awful lot of stuff to go wrong very expensively! And then a £60 charge if you decide you want to leave...
 
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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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Except that this gives you the 5p rate at any time of day which could be a benefit. Octopus Go seems too good to be true at the moment so something like this could become more competitive in the future.
How much of a benefit though really? Realistically the grid load is still going to be lowest at night so probably 360 days a year you're going to be charging overnight anyway the other 5 you might need a few kWh in the car for one extra journey a day.

Except you have to deal with a super complex system where you get charged full price and have to hope that the system credits you back the right amount. And you don't benefit from off peak rates for any of your other usage...

It strikes me that all they've really done is increase the peak rate so that on average they're basically going to average out the same - but you have to deal with all that added complexity, the £625 minimum install cost and a £60 fee for leaving...
 

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Except that this gives you the 5p rate at any time of day which could be a benefit. Octopus Go seems too good to be true at the moment so something like this could become more competitive in the future.
I think that's a marginal benefit at best and is the single pro in a whole sea of cons.
 

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You presumably can't plug the car in at midday needing five hours charge and say you need it by 7pm that night, and still get the 5p rate? I mean, that's letting the charger decide when to charge, but still not giving it enough time to do so?
 

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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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2,856 Posts
You presumably can't plug the car in at midday needing five hours charge and say you need it by 7pm that night, and still get the 5p rate? I mean, that's letting the charger decide when to charge, but still not giving it enough time to do so?
This is where it all comes undone because presumably somehow Ovo need to know how much charge the car needs, so again you're reliant on the technology.

But even then, that's why you're paying inflated peak rates I guess. So it all averages out to Ovo.
 

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" using Ovo’s AI algorithms to charge vehicles when prices are low automatically and electricity is at its greenest. "

Not really "all times of the day" then.

Also irun my machines, charge my lifepo4 home battery etc on octopus go faster and average 8.5p/kwh overall. I wouldnt be able to do that with thistariff
 

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The Indra Smart Pro uses the Kazula platform for its smart capabilities.Kazula is owned by Ovo.
Therefore they will get the info on charge usage that way.
The charger let's you set a ready time and enter cheap tariff rate and time.
By default it will wait for cheap time.


Wonder if Ovo will be able to amend the cheap time to match cheap electricity based on grid usage / generation costs?
 

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The Indra Smart Pro uses the Kazula platform for its smart capabilities.Kazula is owned by Ovo.
The trouble is that as soon as companies start using sub-metering of the EV charger, it all becomes horribly non-standardised and starts locking you into certain platforms, suppliers and tariffs because there isn't an industry standard for how energy suppliers receive and handle sub-metering data. Same issue with controls, none of the suppliers utilise the smart metering platform for control purposes so you get a lots of incompatible platforms tying you in.

Trouble is that at the moment there's too many companies who think they can succeed by building their own closed platforms and systems, I suspect that ultimately this will hold the market back because consumers need the flexibility to switch energy providers without losing their smart charging functionality, and that will only happen with open standards and interoperable systems and equipment.
 

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Well Anytime is working for me! I've just saved £3.06 as I totally forgot to plug the car in last night.

The 34kWh that I needed would have cost me £4.76 on Octopus Go, and instead will have cost me £1.70 once it finishes at 18.30, which is the ready by time I set in the Kaluza app many months ago.

I'm not locked in to OVO specific hardware, the App hasn't ever stopped working, not that I ever need to go into it. I've always had it set with "Ready by X" times.

This is a great solution for those high mileage drivers with big batteries.
 

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The trouble is that as soon as companies start using sub-metering of the EV charger, it all becomes horribly non-standardised and starts locking you into certain platforms, suppliers and tariffs because there isn't an industry standard for how energy suppliers receive and handle sub-metering data. Same issue with controls, none of the suppliers utilise the smart metering platform for control purposes so you get a lots of incompatible platforms tying you in.

Trouble is that at the moment there's too many companies who think they can succeed by building their own closed platforms and systems, I suspect that ultimately this will hold the market back because consumers need the flexibility to switch energy providers without losing their smart charging functionality, and that will only happen with open standards and interoperable systems and equipment.
Not correct. There are open standards for all of this. They just aren't widely adopted yet.

P375
COP11
OCPP
etc.

Sent from my SM-N976B using Tapatalk
 

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Not correct. There are open standards for all of this. They just aren't widely adopted yet.
No, there's standards for a few small parts of the chain, like metering accuracy (COP11) which is still being developed and charge point control (OCPP) at the charge-point, but there's no standards for the bit in the middle, the connection back to the energy supplier, how the energy supplier gets the data and controls the charge point, and how to handle change of supplier to ensure it is interoperable.

The missing standards piece is the communication of metering data and control signals, from the charge point to/from the energy supplier, and at the moment this is where companies are all launching their own platforms and solutions, without that interoperability. The closest thing to a standard for the interoperable communications system are PAS1878 and PAS1879, but these are specifications on what is required rather than detailed standards with requirements to ensure interoperability.

For the next few years it's going to be a consumer mine field, where certain smart tariffs work with certain smart chargers or EV APIs, but not others, where certain smart functionality will stop when you change supplier, or where existing smart chargers can't work with new smart tariffs.
 

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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
Joined
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2,856 Posts
Not correct. There are open standards for all of this. They just aren't widely adopted yet.

P375
COP11
OCPP
etc.

Sent from my SM-N976B using Tapatalk
A standard with low adoption is as good as proprietary...by the time mass adoption takes place, you can practically guarantee those standards will be outdated!
 
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Leaf 30kWh, HS PHEV
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At present only Indra’s Smart Pro is supported. Seems like a half hearted measure though they Ovo have been working with Kaluza and Indra for a while. Thanks I’ll stick with ago Faster for now


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