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I am expecting lots of different answers on this one as there are so many products out there, but having spent such a lot of money on our EV's, how do you look after the paint/coating of your car to keep it in pristine condition. What products do you use? I see so many new and interesting products out there but I am always looking for something better. Currently I have a couple of coats of ceramic/graphene hard wax maintained by regular (after every wash) coats of Bouncers done and dusted SI version detailing spray. For me its about keeping that new car shine and hydrophobic properties all the time.
Anyone else got some great combinations?
 

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Renault Zoe 50
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Yesterday I observed my neighbour Juan clean his VW Jetta with a household mop.

Not sure if he was using Cif, but he only had one bucket.

Surely this is the future.

Oh, and ‘paint maintenance’? Surely the OP is taking the proverbial?
 

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Water, hopefully just falling from the sky
Are you mad? Water is known to cause oxidation.

The stuff that comes from the sky is also acidic.

You need to put it through a 6 stage reverse osmosis system. Then distill it and add a cartridge to put the essential minerals back into the water.
 

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Yesterday I observed my neighbour Juan clean his VW Jetta with a household mop.

Not sure if he was using Cif, but he only had one bucket.

Surely this is the future.

Oh, and ‘paint maintenance’? Surely the OP is taking the proverbial?
Lol, my dad uses a mop, but then it is a Renault Captur :LOL:
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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I use a detailing spray every so often, not because of any magical properties but it makes washing the car easier. I also find going over the car after a wash does make it nice and shiny which makes me feel better about the half arsed job I’ve just done of cleaning it.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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One of the more important facets I've considered is having some paint protection film applied to the more 'susceptible' areas.
I thought about this but given I seem to end up with stone chips on the roof of all my cars, and the Niro is no exception, it seems I’d have to cover the whole thing.
 

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I have had the habit of taking delivery of a new car washing and polishing it with autoglym immediately , then using their super resin polish followed by the protective coat gloss. I wash with their body wash and use the after wash easy polish spray stuff. But as time has gone on i wash the car less and less a thankless task when you live in the countryside like I do one pass up to the village and it is covered in mud in winter and dust in the summer so the main thing I do now is wash off the swallow droppings as I see them and a wash if I am going away. Am impressed with the Mercedes paint in that it tends to keep its shine quite well. There is also less environmental crud in the air here so its beading properties are quickly restored when it’s washed. If you lived in a dry sunny environment then am sure keeping the car clean has more attractions than the north west of France or the U.K.🤣
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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The toughness of the paint / laquer varies from manufacturer.
My 12year old 100k mile C5 had few stone chips and nor did my 66k 7year old CRZ, or a 2year old 15k DS3. Whereas all my Alfas have suffered badly, even a 2year old 15k Guiletta was shocking, although it was balck - a colour notorious for showing every hairline scratch, swirl mark and chip.

Otherwise I never polish my cars, only using a good quality wash/wax (Meguiars Gold) after a hose down to wash off dust, and left to dry naturally.
 

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Not done much to the E-Niro, apart from washing using the Diamondbrite stuff that came with it. On my Merc I used to clay it once a year then Autoglym polish, followed by a coat of HD wax, then Wax every six months. I got washed with plain water in between. I get the feeling the paint on the E-Niro is softer than the Mercedes.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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I really neglected my old Mondy estate, washed it a few times a year towards the end and then basically hardly used it. When I got rid of it at 11 years old, gave it a jet wash. Scrubbed the moss off the rubbers, looked great. Quick wipe over with a detailer spray and there was no hint of neglect. Paint either survives or it doesn’t and short of protective plastic coverings I’m not really convinced much we do really makes any difference.
 

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I really neglected my old Mondy estate, washed it a few times a year towards the end and then basically hardly used it. When I got rid of it at 11 years old, gave it a jet wash. Scrubbed the moss off the rubbers, looked great. Quick wipe over with a detailer spray and there was no hint of neglect. Paint either survives or it doesn’t and short of protective plastic coverings I’m not really convinced much we do really makes any difference.

I stumbled across a YouTube channel the other day, about a couple of guys buying salvage cars at auction, repairing them (very well indeed) and selling them on. One theme throughout is that very often they spend a couple of hours thoroughly cleaning cars that look beyond hope, inside and out, and they almost always come out looking brilliant. They don't use any of the special magic potions, either, usually just a jet wash, detergent, maybe some tar remover and perhaps some of that rinse aid wax (brilliant stuff, stops water marks and gives a shine with no hard work). About the only only magic stuff they use is one of the cheaper products that rejuvenates black plastic trim for a while.
 

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one of the benefits of the yearly service at Nissan is that our car gets its wash whether it needs it or not… apart from that, we give it a going over after winter to get the salt off. As with some of the above, living in the English countryside, there isn’t much point trying to keep it clean. I see dirt as an additional paint protection layer.
 

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The Autoglym stuff is generally good. Rinse, then use their standard shampoo, a microfibre mitt, and the two bucket method (first: cold water; second: warm shampoo water; dunk mitt in that order). Then rinse again. Dry with a microfibre towel. If using a pressure washer for the rinsing, only use at low power/wide spread: high power can damage things.

For extra brownie points, you can use the HD Wax and/or the Super Resin Polish occasionally after a good wash. Follow the instructions carefully.

Car detailing is a whole other world. There are forums just like this one for it. Another rabbit hole to lose yourself down, if you want.

When visiting the Nissan dealership, I noticed that the paintwork on many of the cars was shocking. A lot had significant 'orange peeling' (where the finish looks slightly bumpy in the light, just like...). Then I started noticing it on most other new cars too. Once you start really looking, you will see. At the family car level, a lot of the manufacturers really don't seem to care about this. So, really, in a busy world, why should the owners?

Kind regards
- Garry
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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one of the benefits of the yearly service at Nissan is that our car gets its wash whether it needs it or not… apart from that, we give it a going over after winter to get the salt off. As with some of the above, living in the English countryside, there isn’t much point trying to keep it clean. I see dirt as an additional paint protection layer.
Exactly. A good layer of mud on the sills dampens the impact from the stones.
 

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I stumbled across a YouTube channel the other day, about a couple of guys buying salvage cars at auction, repairing them (very well indeed) and selling them on. One theme throughout is that very often they spend a couple of hours thoroughly cleaning cars that look beyond hope, inside and out, and they almost always come out looking brilliant. They don't use any of the special magic potions, either, usually just a jet wash, detergent, maybe some tar remover and perhaps some of that rinse aid wax (brilliant stuff, stops water marks and gives a shine with no hard work). About the only only magic stuff they use is one of the cheaper products that rejuvenates black plastic trim for a while.
Which rinseaid do you use? Water here is really hard and the car can look worse after a wash. Someone recently posted here about using rainwater which has been a revelation, but if the waterbutt runs low it’s back to mains water.
 

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When visiting the Nissan dealership, I noticed that the paintwork on many of the cars was shocking. A lot had significant 'orange peeling' (where the finish looks slightly bumpy in the light, just like...). Then I started noticing it on most other new cars too. Once you start really looking, you will see. At the family car level, a lot of the manufacturers really don't seem to care about this. So, really, in a busy world, why should the owners?

Kind regards
- Garry
Yeah, I've been looking at Golf GTEs at VW dealerships and they want top dollar for cars that IMHO look unloved and just battered around when you look at the stone chips turning rusty, scratches, kerbed wheels etc... They look worse than my 11 year old Golf :LOL:
 
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