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MG ZS EV Exclusive
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When I had my Nissan Leaf I used to leave the vehicle in Park, with the handbrake left off.
I've tried to do this with my MS ZS EV but try as I might. I haven't found a way to do it. Is it possible? Can anyone suggest a method?
I think, with lockdown, and not using the car at all, it would be beneficial to just leave it in park, thus avoiding any possibility of the handbrake sticking on.
 

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2017 Golf GTE
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In an old school automatic ICE you engaged a mechanical transmission lock when you moved that big lever ( remember it!) to 'Park' .
Nowadays with all electronic brakes and little bottoms as selectors, I doubt that Park does anything as clunky.
 

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Why on God's green earth would you want to do that? Your car has an electronic brake that controls all 4 wheels. When you put it in P it engages the brakes for your safety.
Does the MG apply the brake pads to all four wheels ?.
MOST electric hand brakes only lock the rear wheels of the car I have found.
Reference the hand brake sticking "ON".
I have found from experience that the hand brake is more likely to "Jam" and release with a "Bang" after the car has been washed and left to stand over night, or even after a couple of days strangely enough.
I have seen this on a few of cars we have owned, either with rear drum brakes or rear disc brakes.
If the car is taken on a short run and the brakes applied a few times after the wash, then it does not happen.
This condition of rust quickly building up on the brake disc's is accelerated if your are using an alloy wheel cleaning product.
Surface rust appears on the brake disc within hours !.
In answer to the original question, I don't think there is any other way to prevent the car from rolling UNLESS you apply the electric handbrake.
This is the "Park" position as you call it.
Sorry, I am not familiar with handbrake set up on the Leaf, but my guess would be that when you put the car in "Park" it acts in the same way, and applies the electric servos to stop the car from rolling.
Unless it has another "Back Up" system to prevent the car from moving ?.
But I can't see the point of that really.
 

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Does the MG apply the brake pads to all four wheels ?.
MOST electric hand brakes only lock the rear wheels of the car I have found.
Reference the hand brake sticking "ON".
I have found from experience that the hand brake is more likely to "Jam" and release with a "Bang" after the car has been washed and left to stand over night, or even after a couple of days strangely enough.
I have seen this on a few of cars we have owned, either with rear drum brakes or rear disc brakes.
If the car is taken on a short run and the brakes applied a few times after the wash, then it does not happen.
This condition of rust quickly building up on the brake disc's is accelerated if your are using an alloy wheel cleaning product.
Surface rust appears on the brake disc within hours !.
In answer to the original question, I don't think there is any other way to prevent the car from rolling UNLESS you apply the electric handbrake.
This is the "Park" position as you call it.
Sorry, I am not familiar with handbrake set up on the Leaf, but my guess would be that when you put the car in "Park" it acts in the same way, and applies the electric servos to stop the car from rolling.
Unless it has another "Back Up" system to prevent the car from moving ?.
But I can't see the point of that really.
YES YES YES
 

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Does the MG apply the brake pads to all four wheels ?.
Sorry, I am not familiar with handbrake set up on the Leaf, but my guess would be that when you put the car in "Park" it acts in the same way, and applies the electric servos to stop the car from rolling.
Unless it has another "Back Up" system to prevent the car from moving ?.
But I can't see the point of that really.
The LEAF has a solenoid actuated pawl that applies to the reduction gear, and hence stops the front wheels turning (independently). The rear wheels are only braked by a conventional handbrake acting on drums inside the rear disks.

I can't believe that the ZS has a handbrake on all four wheels unless it applies both systems at the same time.
 

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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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The handbrake is the same as ICE cars, a worm-gear driven mechanism on the back brake caliper. It's very powerful and much more reliable than you'd think these days.

It's a trade off. There's also stories of the transmission lock getting stuck whilst engaged, so you choose which one you'd prefer to repair when it goes wrong. Personally I'll use both because i'd rather have the car towed off the drive than have it roll down it .. :)
 

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The handbrake is the same as ICE cars, a worm-gear driven mechanism on the back brake caliper. It's very powerful and much more reliable than you'd think these days.
Unlike the same idea on the Gen1 LEAF then!
It's a trade off. There's also stories of the transmission lock getting stuck whilst engaged, so you choose which one you'd prefer to repair when it goes wrong.
The transmission lock on the LEAF comes on when you power the car down, so it is a choice only of whether you use the "handbrake" as well as rather than instead of the transmission lock.
 

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Unlike the same idea on the Gen1 LEAF then!

The transmission lock on the LEAF comes on when you power the car down, so it is a choice only of whether you use the "handbrake" as well as rather than instead of the transmission lock.
So, are we of the opinion that the ZS EV only locks the REAR callipers when the electric parking brake is applied then ?.
Also, do we know if it also has the back up “drive lock” on the single speed transmission also like the Leaf ?.
IF the electric handbrake ONLY locks both rear wheels, then you would expect it to have a transmission brake locking the front drive wheels as well when selecting “Park”.
This would make sense, because if only the electric handbrake was applied and the transmission was in neutral, if you jacked up both rear wheels clear of the ground on an incline, the car would be allowed to roll forward.
If the back up of the transmission brake is automatically applied when selecting “Park” this locks the front wheels.
Therefore having the reverse effect if you jacked up both front wheels.
Basically, electric servo callipers apply the rear pads to the disc’s when applying the handbrake, and the transmission is locked holding the front drive wheels when “Park” is selected.
If my theory is correct, it works in the very same way as the older automatic cars, only they had a mechanical hand brake to yank up !.
If this is indeed correct, and we return to the original question first posted.
“Can I prevent the handbrake from sticking, by leaving off the handbrake”.
The yes you COULD - If my theory is correct.
Here comes the BUT though.
Remember, if you lock the transmission ONLY by using the “Park” facility, you are placing a LOT of weight and strain on that small locking system in the transmission !.
To make a quick pit stop on an even road, you should be okay.
But never on a steep incline !.
That is why they design the car to have the power of the service electric brakes at the rear.
If you parked on an steep incline, then put the car in “Park” only, when you returned to the car, there would be an unpleasant “Bang” from the transmission as it attempts to release the locking mechanism under load.
Not recommend !.
If the car had two systems, they are there for good reason.
They need to be used in conjunction with each other.
Otherwise you risk damaging your transmission.
 

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In countries with very severe frosts, you can get your handbrake frozen on if the brakes are very wet when you park up and the temperature drops well below freezing. In such circumstances you're better off parking the car in gear than using the hand brake.

There were some cases decaded ago where manufacturers tried to take shot cuts, I think it was the Citroen Xantia which really had the problem, where the hand brake used the rear disks. If you parked when the brakes were very hot and didn't apply the handbrake really tightly, the disk would shrink slightly as it cooled and if the car was parked on a hill, the car would roll away!

So, I am in favour of a mechanical interlock as parking break, as well as friction brakes. I'd want the interlock to be design so it can't freeze in place, and possibly to be able to park on an horizontal surface with the friction brake off to avoid it being frozen on.
 

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The LEAF has a solenoid actuated pawl that applies to the reduction gear,
Zoe is the same. When my first Zoe was ready to be picked up, I had a call that I would have to wait as the car was up for a recall. That particular part was being replaced by a 'beefier' version. Had to drop the motor out to do it and it took a week. I wasn't bothered as I was using the manager's Zoe.
 

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Vast majority of European cars use handbrakes consisting of the regular rear pads on the regular rear discs. It's mostly Asian cars that persist with dedicated parking brake drums. For all those European cars, the handbrakes mostly work OK. The trend for motor powered
Handbrake calipers is solving a problem that did not exist IMHO.
 

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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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I think the motor powered handbrake calipers are able to put far more force onto the rear brakes than a human using a 12 foot long piece of cable ever could. Most hand-operated caliper-type rear brakes barely achieve 30% braking force, whilst the motor powered ones come close to the performance of a drum arrangement. I've had drum-and-disc setups on the rear on european cars in the past, but I'd agree it's less common now. It was considered a superior setup (for good reason).
 
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