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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This popped up on my Google "you may be interested feed" today. It's quite an old story, so apologies if it's been linked before.


I wonder if this sort of technology would be useful to give surge capacity at MSA's in school holiday periods, when even the increased capacity of GRIDSERVE's new hubs isn't going to cut it.

A few of these trucks dotted at strategic points around the motorway network - maybe at places that don't merit the installation of a large bank of chargers, could be enormously useful to fill in the gaps.
 

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Nice idea, though I don't see it fitting the MSA/holidays use case very well - you'd need a lot of them all at the same time in many different places.

I think that sort of truck would be much better used at one-off events where large numbers of cars turn up - some sporting events, say, or showgrounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tesla has done that in the US before for big holidays.

Interesting to see. Obviously if Tesla are going to open up the Supercharger network like Musk said he plans to, that solves a little of the capacity issue anyway.

At Fleet services near me, we have 2 legacy ecotricity pumps, and 8 - mostly empty - Tesla spaces.
 

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MG5
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What about having lorry's on the motorway that have charging ports at the back and you just tail gate them and connect up just like refueling a plane mid flight 😜
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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What about having lorry's on the motorway that have charging ports at the back and you just tail gate them and connect up just like refueling a plane mid flight 😜
Just ask for a tow and leave it in regen.

... I suggested it many Moons ago.

 

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I went to an EV event a couple of years back and even the organisers of that struggled and failed to provide temporary charging facilities, so I can see this kind of thing could be useful.

Though I think these concepts set themselves up to fail by aiming a bit too high using a battery to supply the charging, batteries are very expensive, they're big, bulky and the whole thing needs moving to another location with a substantial electricity supply in order to recharge it.

Would be better accepting that for remote power like that a generator-set is the more compact and cost effective solution and using a green fuel, like biomethane, ethanol or biodiesel to power it, afterall it's a temporary installation.
 

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Interesting. The problem with creating new charging facilities is the connection to the national grid. If you want lots of rapid chargers you need a massive new connection to the grid, which could cost a 6-figure sum to install. A huge battery like Porsche uses here is also expensive, but might sometimes make sense. The batteries can be 'trickle charged' all day/night with whatever the local grid can provide. They can then dump that energy at high speed as needed. However, if it's over-used, it will run out of power in peak times.
 

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Interesting. The problem with creating new charging facilities is the connection to the national grid. If you want lots of rapid chargers you need a massive new connection to the grid, which could cost a 6-figure sum to install. A huge battery like Porsche uses here is also expensive, but might sometimes make sense. The batteries can be 'trickle charged' all day/night with whatever the local grid can provide. They can then dump that energy at high speed as needed. However, if it's over-used, it will run out of power in peak times.
It always was, and is my repeated critique of the EVangelists' panacea to plonk chargers everywhere at virtually zero cost.
 

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Interesting. The problem with creating new charging facilities is the connection to the national grid. If you want lots of rapid chargers you need a massive new connection to the grid, which could cost a 6-figure sum to install. A huge battery like Porsche uses here is also expensive, but might sometimes make sense. The batteries can be 'trickle charged' all day/night with whatever the local grid can provide. They can then dump that energy at high speed as needed. However, if it's over-used, it will run out of power in peak times.
There are now rapid chargers with their own battery packs that trickle charge. BP are trialling one at their HQ

 

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There are now rapid chargers with their own battery packs that trickle charge. BP are trialling one at their HQ
I've seen a few companies promoting these units, they seem one of those ideas which while technically possible, you wonder how useful they would be in practice and whether they'd be commercially viable.

The battery must push up the cost of the unit by quite a lot, offset by the grid connection saving, but meaning the unit has a limited capacity for charging sessions each day due to the need to maintain charge. Depending on the ratio of supply capacity to charging demand, you could find it dropping back limited to its supply capacity. It performance would seem very sensitive to site factors like capacity, charging events, typical energy dispensed per charging session.

It seems ideal for locations with small capacity supplies and infrequent rapid charging, but infrequent charging means low utilisation and very high prices.
 

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It seems ideal for locations with small capacity supplies and infrequent rapid charging, but infrequent charging means low utilisation and very high prices.
I think that’s exactly the use case - in my mind, rural petrol stations are perfect sites for these battery augmented chargers. They charge up for slowly and then provide a rapid charge when infrequently needed.

I’m pretty sure that once the newness has rubbed off, and on-street charging is sorted, people will stop ‘filling up’ at rapids very often and instead get the bare minimum at an eye watering price.

This sort of charger in a rural location might never need to revert to the fallback grid level. Even better could be smartly integrated with PV and powering the petrol station shop etc.
 
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