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puch27
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Does anyone know of a portable 7kW charger? I often park up next to film/tv generators that have 32 amp feeds. The 3 pin charger supplied with my i3 (2.5kW I guess) takes too long to charge.


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Bejesus the price of those bad boys!

I'd be tempted to get a 2nd hand charger off the bay or such and just change the input cable to a 5pi. 32amp socket and go with that. A lighter one would be best with as short a supply cable as possible.
 

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The Khons portable EVSE has been purchased by at least one forum contributor. You can buy one with a 32A CEE plug attached. It's adjustable.
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Take a look at this lead.

Type 2 - (62196-2) - 32AMP - SINGLE PHASE : Charging cable for E-cars

I have one of their earlier 16A versions fitted with a 'blue caravan plug' or EN60309-1 16A 230V 2P+E to give it its correct name, it works well and was well priced at the time. Shipping was reasonable and took less than a week. The maximum charging current can be set for those times when you only have access to a lower powered output.
 

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I guess the OP needs to confirm if he wants a 32A single phase portable EVSE or just a 16A device with a 32A (CEE?) plug.

If it's increasing charging speed, a device limited to 10 or 16A won't cut it.
 

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Also it's a personal thing, but I would not buy any unbranded non marked EVSE device off eBay. It has safety related functions and you are hooking it up to an expensive asset.
 

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Also it's a personal thing, but I would not buy any unbranded non marked EVSE device off eBay. It has safety related functions and you are hooking it up to an expensive asset.
An EVSE just a switch - apart from being incorrectly wired and shoving mains up the pilot pin, or heating damaging the socket, it's hard to see how it could damage the car.
Obviously there is a potential fire risk for the unit itself, but buying a name brand ( e.g. Rolec) is no guarantee against that.
 

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An EVSE just a switch - apart from being incorrectly wired and shoving mains up the pilot pin, or heating damaging the socket, it's hard to see how it could damage the car.
Obviously there is a potential fire risk for the unit itself, but buying a name brand ( e.g. Rolec) is no guarantee against that.
Yes it's a switch, BUT even the difference between a good contactor with correct air gap for 32A duty and cheap non compliant one... Now think about the additional safety functions, this is not provided by the "switch" Is the pilot signal compliant? Is the unit controllable so the user can match to any supply limitations?

End of the day it's a personal thing as stated but best to have ones eyes open.
 

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JUICE BOOSTER 2 32 A Mobile Charging Station is the top of the range in the portable high powered EVSE space as far as I know.

Historically some Tesla owners bought these (and the previous 1st generation model) but now that the Tesla UMC is supplied as standard with all cars, and Tesla have downgraded the onboard charging to 16.5kW, I don't think anyone bothers any more.

(sadly a Tesla UMC is probably not the right answer for you, since they have eccentric wiring in respect of the 32A blue commando adaptor)
 

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I always use the the button on the key to end charging. Presumably the car then stops charging and the relay in the EVSE is then not switching a load. When the car starts charging from home the relay in my home charger closes then a few seconds later the charge starts, the car therefore is in control. I assume it's the car that stops the charger when you press the connector release button.

If the pilot signal is non compliant then it's unlikely that the car would start to charge. It's likely that the data driver chip will be a standard device so the voltages should be correct. The only real safety functions of the EVSE are the integrated RCD to ensure the user doesn't get a fatal shock should there be a fault in the car and the bodywork become live or damage to the cable and thermal monitoring of the plugs.

As with all electronics it's impossible to check that they meet correct safety standards, we rely that the CE mark means that it's compliant but anyone can put a CE mark on their product and it's only likely to be tested if something has gone wrong.
 

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Worth noting that the control interface for AC charging is analogue, not digital, and that is one reason why there is a fair bit of variation from one EVSE to another, and from the way one vehicle OBC behaves when compared with another. OBCs normally ignore the -12 V part of the CP signal, as the standard only requires a diode at the vehicle fixed plug to short the CP to PE. The interpretation of the available current signal, which is done by measuring the duty cycle of the 1 kHz nominal frequency control pilot signal has a tolerance, and most OBCs err slightly on the side of setting their charge current below the maximum current available, as signalled by the CP. Also, the voltage bands on the loaded positive-going part of the CP signal have a tolerance, so half a volt or more either side of the nominal threshold voltages will still work OK.

Although it's a bit of a clunky interface, by many modern standards, it is pretty robust, and fails safe under pretty much any condition. Using resistors that load down an analogue signal does make for a pretty simple way of allowing a single wire to robustly control a number of different operating and fault conditions.

The Ebay portable EVSE looks interesting. Might be worth getting one to strip and test, just to see how well made it is, and how safe it is. Even if it isn't that well made, it shows how it's possible to make an EVSE for a lot less than some fixed units are being sold for. Even upgrading the critical parts (if needed) probably wouldn't increase the price by more than about £30 to £40.
 
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