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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
First time poster here, hello!

I'm currently not an EV owner or driver; I really want one but currently can't yet afford one. So yes, I'm a filthy ICE driver (especially filthy; it's a Euro 3 diesel!). Don't worry, I respect the parking spaces near the chargers!

My father currently drives a Leaf gen2, but being 230 miles away, he has only brought it once, but now prefers to take my mum's diesel A3; the battery range just isn't enough for him. However, he's ordered the new Hyundai which'll have a fairly hefty battery and therefore should be able to make the journey either non-stop or with a short-ish charge on a rapid to make sure he arrives with a bit of power spare. He normally pops up to see the rugby locally, so the car's only here for an overnight & he sets off after breakfast the next day, so there's only around 12-14 hours that the car's parked.

Running the numbers, the 13A socket chargers probably wouldn't have enough time to complete a charge from ~10% to 100% in that time. So we need something more powerful. Fortunately my garage is where the main 100A incomer & consumer unit is, so getting plenty of amps is theoretically pretty easy.


However, it seems the wall mounted chargers (rolec etc) are fairly expensive, and also quite inflexible - they're installed permanently. Plus since I don't myself own an EV, I don't think I qualify for any grants or similar stuff.

I was thinking, for when I eventually own an EV, I often drive to places which don't have EV charging but which do have 16A and 32A commando outlets. So would it be sensible for me to get a 32A single phase commando/cee outlet installed, then get something like this Knons 32A portable charger:
Khons 32A IEC-62196 portable evse charger with blue CEE for electric cars - I could run the portable charger at 32A, or limit it to 16A/13A if I've connected it via adaptors to a supply with a lower current limit. Works fine at home, works fine if I'm at a workshop/similar which has a bigger supply available.

This, to me, seems a much more versatile way of doing things - is there a drawback? It feels as though I'm missing something blindingly obvious - why don't more people go down this path?

Thank you all for reading & for any advice you can share!
 

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Be aware that there are two types of plug on the car end, Type 1 (J1772) and Type 2 (Mennekes). The link you gave is for a unit with a Type 2 plug which will NOT fit the 24 or 30kWh Leaf, which it sounds as though your father has.

The new Leaf (40kWh) and most other electric cars in the UK now have Type 2 sockets, so your lead will work with them, but not with the older Leaf (or the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV which is also Type 1) . You can't convert from one to the other unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Be aware that there are two types of plug on the car end, Type 1 (J1772) and Type 2 (Mennekes). It looks as though the link you gave is for J1772 which will fit the 24 or 30kWh Leaf, and which it sounds as though your father has.

The new Leaf (40kWh) and most other electric cars, apart from the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, in the UK have Type 2 sockets, so your lead will not work with them. You can't convert from one to the other unfortunately.

The US standard is Type 1, and since the unit you linked to is priced in USD, that's probably which it's Type 1.
Aha, so for basically any new car here in the UK (and some of the older ones, eg Tesla S), it's a Type 2 that I'll be needing?
If I find the appropriate alternative with a Type 2 connector, though, would that be the right answer?

Thanks for helping me, I did wonder what Type 1 and Type 2 meant.
 

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I don't think there is anything wrong with this approach in principle.

Just be sure about the quality and warranty of a Chinese EVSE. There are a number of reputable EU manufacturers which may be worth researching for peace of mind.
 

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Aha, so for basically any new car here in the UK (and some of the older ones, eg Tesla S), it's a Type 2 that I'll be needing?
If I find the appropriate alternative with a Type 2 connector, though, would that be the right answer?

Thanks for helping me, I did wonder what Type 1 and Type 2 meant.
Please read my edited reply which is totally different! (I did put up an interim edit saying "EDITING - don't read" while I was changing it, but I was obviously not quick enough!)
 

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One other thing to be aware of: a commando / CEE socket is usually intended for commercial use and as such they don't have shutter protection which a socket in a domestic install is required to have. You can get around that by installing one with an interlock that won't let it be made live until the plug is in.

I agree the solution is flexible and good value for money and would be a good idea in your circumstances. I think the only reason that most EV owners don't do it that way is that for those of us who really want the unit just for use in one fixed location, a standard wall mounted unit is slightly more convenient (less easy to steal for example) and with the grant probably cheaper (portable units wouldn't be eligible for the grant). Also, many of the wall mounted chargers are easily serviceable (i.e. you can replace individual components if a part fails) whereas a portable one is probably not very easy to repair and therefore possibly less value for money in the long term.

In your circumstances yes I'd do exactly what you propose. And good on you for facilitating a reduction in fossil fuel usage!
 

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Aha, so for basically any new car here in the UK (and some of the older ones, eg Tesla S), it's a Type 2 that I'll be needing?
If I find the appropriate alternative with a Type 2 connector, though, would that be the right answer?

Thanks for helping me, I did wonder what Type 1 and Type 2 meant.
I'd keep an eye on eBay for universal (type 2) EV charge points from Podpoint, Rolec and Charge Master. In short term I'd check Polar (plus) chargers at nearby car parks.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

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Hi All,
First time poster here, hello!

I'm currently not an EV owner or driver; I really want one but currently can't yet afford one. So yes, I'm a filthy ICE driver (especially filthy; it's a Euro 3 diesel!). Don't worry, I respect the parking spaces near the chargers!

My father currently drives a Leaf gen2, but being 230 miles away, he has only brought it once, but now prefers to take my mum's diesel A3; the battery range just isn't enough for him. However, he's ordered the new Hyundai which'll have a fairly hefty battery and therefore should be able to make the journey either non-stop or with a short-ish charge on a rapid to make sure he arrives with a bit of power spare. He normally pops up to see the rugby locally, so the car's only here for an overnight & he sets off after breakfast the next day, so there's only around 12-14 hours that the car's parked.

Running the numbers, the 13A socket chargers probably wouldn't have enough time to complete a charge from ~10% to 100% in that time. So we need something more powerful. Fortunately my garage is where the main 100A incomer & consumer unit is, so getting plenty of amps is theoretically pretty easy.


However, it seems the wall mounted chargers (rolec etc) are fairly expensive, and also quite inflexible - they're installed permanently. Plus since I don't myself own an EV, I don't think I qualify for any grants or similar stuff.

I was thinking, for when I eventually own an EV, I often drive to places which don't have EV charging but which do have 16A and 32A commando outlets. So would it be sensible for me to get a 32A single phase commando/cee outlet installed, then get something like this Knons 32A portable charger:
Khons 32A IEC-62196 portable evse charger with blue CEE for electric cars - I could run the portable charger at 32A, or limit it to 16A/13A if I've connected it via adaptors to a supply with a lower current limit. Works fine at home, works fine if I'm at a workshop/similar which has a bigger supply available.

This, to me, seems a much more versatile way of doing things - is there a drawback? It feels as though I'm missing something blindingly obvious - why don't more people go down this path?

Thank you all for reading & for any advice you can share!
If your Dad is getting a Kona, you could swipe his Leaf40

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Please read my edited reply which is totally different! (I did put up an interim edit saying "EDITING - don't read" while I was changing it, but I was obviously not quick enough!)
No worries! I got an email about your reply, so jumped on it somewhat!
Thanks for the reply though, very helpful indeed.

One other thing to be aware of: a commando / CEE socket is usually intended for commercial use and as such they don't have shutter protection which a socket in a domestic install is required to have. You can get around that by installing one with an interlock that won't let it be made live until the plug is in.

I agree the solution is flexible and good value for money and would be a good idea in your circumstances. I think the only reason that most EV owners don't do it that way is that for those of us who really want the unit just for use in one fixed location, a standard wall mounted unit is slightly more convenient (less easy to steal for example) and with the grant probably cheaper (portable units wouldn't be eligible for the grant). Also, many of the wall mounted chargers are easily serviceable (i.e. you can replace individual components if a part fails) whereas a portable one is probably not very easy to repair and therefore possibly less value for money in the long term.

In your circumstances yes I'd do exactly what you propose. And good on you for facilitating a reduction in fossil fuel usage!
It'd be inside a garage, so the theft angle isn't much of an issue for me, but of course for others reading this thread it might be relevant! Good call on the shutters, I'll make sure it's an interlocked one. Fortunately it'll be within a metre or so of the consumer unit / meter etc, so it shouldn't cost much to get it installed. And yep, I was originally running an old diesel since the pollution emitted to make it in the first place should see a return on 'investment' (if you can call it that?) but driving in an urban area does produce a lot of localised air pollution, which really isn't great. But I do quite a few long (200+ mile) motorway journeys when I really don't have much time to stop multiple times to charge, and the current plug in hybrids really aren't such amazing value yet, especially considering they all seem to revert to around 40-50mpg when on a long 75-80mph run... at least based on the reviews I've seen! But in a couple more years...!

I'd keep an eye on eBay for universal (type 2) EV charge points from Podpoint, Rolec and Charge Master. In short term I'd check Polar (plus) chargers at nearby car parks.
Are you inferring I should get a 'wall mounted' type 2 charger and simply put a 32A feed onto it & then 'wall mount' it on a wooden board?

If your Dad is getting a Kona, you could swipe his Leaf40
No dice sadly; I do more long journeys than him, his Leaf 24 (think it's a 24? Dunno, it's a 14 plate..) just doesn't work for my use sadly. Annoyingly it WOULD work perfectly mid-week, my commute is around a 50 mile round trip, but weekends I'd be ruined sadly!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'll make sure not to!
Been looking around, there really don't seem to be many 32A portable chargers, but wherever I see them, the Khons ones keep cropping up. I'll have to now go away and find a spark who'll arrange a 32A cee & get an idea of the cost.. and wait to see if my father drops the cash on a new EV; having something that'll actually need charging is the prerequisite for all of this in the first place!

Thanks everyone :)
 
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