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Hi all.

I've been following the forum closely and feel pretty sure the ampera could well be my next car. Potentially my daily commute is about to change and with that in mind so could my car. I'm likely to be doing a 40 mile each way commute 5 days a week. I'll be able to leave home fully charged but won't be able to recharge for the return journey. Can anyone give me an idea of likely cost of the days commute given this info including the approx cost of charging at home ( I can switch electric supplier and looking at EDF approx cost is £1.28 for a full charge )
I'm aware in winter I won't make it on electric alone but in summer I may well manage 50 mile. The route is approx 18miles A roads and 22 motorway. My current diesel can average 45 mpg on the route so approx 8 LTRs of fuel a day say £10.40 approx. Thanks for bearing with me if you've made it this far and hope my ramble has made sense

Thanks in advance

Sean
 

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Assuming you preheat at the start and in the winter you start on petrol to heat the car and use battery for the A road segments the motorway parts will cost the same as your diesel around 45 -47 mpg , electric between 30 miles and 40 in the summer your cost will be around 5 pounds in petrol and around 12 kWh in electric including losses , you may have to add another 1kwh for preheat the Ampera will give you as a rough guide 10.4kWh of usable capacity and on a roads at 60 ish you will get 3 miles per kWh in the winter more like 4 miles per kWh in the summer

Extremely temps at either end. , cold or hot impact range

If you charge on a time of use tariff Octopus ev it’s 5pence per kWh so 60p a day for a full charge between 12:30 and 04:30 , it’s what I use at home
If you are on a standard tariff it’s around 15p per kWh so more like £2.40
Ev referral tariff below if you are going. for it get the tariff ASAP as the cutover time requires a smart meter and installs are slow , additionally when they install a smart meter get them to install an isolation switch ready for you to eventually get an ev charger installed , this is Olev subsidised


So your saving per day will be around £2.50 more if you can fine a three pin plug and granny charge at work occasionally or if you use the octopus tariff it will almost half your costs to 5-6 pounds approx.

Have a look at zap map to see if you are near to any chargers such as Asda if so you could sign up to polar for 7 quid a month.

If you are doing short journeys at the weekend electric only on the octopus tariff around 40 miles a day then you costs could be 1.20 for 80 miles on the weekend

Roughly if you work 220 days a year your savings will be £1012 per year , I would also add in the zero car tax rate on what ever your current car tax is probably around 200 quid at least
 

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My daily commute used to be 110 miles round trip. 10 miles A class roads, a bit twisty though, only charging at home and my lifetime MPG was sitting at 86 mpg. Motorways were usually at 60 with a slow queue at the end of around 5 miles at 30. I then found a public charger near to work so bought a folding bike for the boot and would take the car to a public charger (free) at lunchtime and then cycle back to it once I had finished work. The 4 hour full charging time was ideal and the bike paid for itself with the lifetime MPG getting up to 250+, but then I was getting a bit obsessive and found a shorter but slower and quieter route, 94 miles, so I could travel a bit slower without holding up traffic and the vast majority of the time I could make it to work on a full charge, including moving to the charger at lunchtime. What really annoyed me was getting within a hundred yards or so of the charger and the engine kicking in.
 

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Simply put, any motorway miles will achieve around 50mpg (with Hold selected) and any electric miles will cost between 1 to 2 pence per mile. I charge at work for free or at home on economy 7 at the moment but just had a smart meter fitted so may be able to go for cheaper off peak electricity.
 

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What really annoyed me was getting within a hundred yards or so of the charger and the engine kicking in.
This is one of the major drawbacks of owning a Volt/Ampera! We don't have "range anxiety" as such, its just that its so enjoyable driving on electrons, burning dead dinosaurs becomes a definite no no. 🤣
 

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This is one of the major drawbacks of owning a Volt/Ampera! We don't have "range anxiety" as such, its just that its so enjoyable driving on electrons, burning dead dinosaurs becomes a definite no no. 🤣
in real terms my average daily mileage is just under 80 miles. I fully charge at home on Economy 7 and pre-condition when I can. I don't often have an opportunity to charge during the day so I am using the engine quite a bit. I also live in a valley so my daily run starts with a hill climb and invariably includes several lengthy stops when the car gets cold.
So far I have averaged 6.3p a mile all in (petrol and electricity) over 9,800 miles. In the Summer it was easy to exceed 40 miles of all electric range but now that I am driving in the cold, wet and dark, my electric range has dropped to below 30 miles and my lowest ever was 23 miles.
 

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The view on this forum is if you are going to use petrol in the winter on the specific journey round trip greater than 40 miles use it first as the byproduct is heat that you can use to heat the cabin and then the residual heat can be used when you switch back to electric. this is not always fully successful as the battery pack is used to heat the battery lliquid thermal management jacket , pre heat can minimse this , last winter when I did not charge at hone and the temp is less than 10c it will easy steal .5kWh just to heat the battery. Two preheats in the winter (one for the battery and then one for the cabin) (and then wait for the car to recharge the battery) and then switch to hold on departure and then after the car is fully heated and providing you are on a slow segment (<60 mph) then switch to electirc and use the residual heat from the engine to heat the car , of course the other issue is rain creates more drag and also reduces range. you also tend to use the heated seats , heated rear window , more lights (minimal) and also the heater.

so if your round trip was 60 miles say then work on the first 10 miles of each journey on petrol and then switch to electirc , decent tyers (and presure) also seem to have a huge impact as you need LRR , based on feedback in this forum it can easily knock off 5 -6 miles of range
 

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...here's a 'retired' answer. To run our house (4 bed detached - East Anglia) and Ampera for a year cost me about £640 per year in electricity - standard tariff - Scottish Power. We have solar panels on the roof that on a poor year return £840 feed-in tariff. On average we spend £200 on petrol each year ...so, basically, the 5 to 6k miles we do each year in the Ampera are 'free'.

...I appreciate that I'm still paying for the installation of the solar panels, so the above 'simple' maths are a bit flakey.

Good luck.
 
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