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If it can charge fast, then it can also discharge fast.
This means lots of power.....
 

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Ten years away I suspect having read the press release. Which should be enough time to get the GW power supply run in to every motorway services. If you are going to dump 100kWh in 60 seconds then you need to be able to push 6MW per car ... that's chunky.
 

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I dont think there is anything new in being able to charge and discharge a capacitor in seconds. The new bit is if they can do that with an appropriate energy density to fit in an EV.

The article said "The new material brings them closer to the storage capacity of a lithium-ion battery".

If it was really groundbreaking it would leapfrog lithium-ion not get closer to it.

Maybe the future is a hybrid of lithium-ion and supercapacitors both feeding the drivetrain. 70/30 split which gives you more power without stressing the battery and a reasonable amount of your range is super quick to recharge. That would be nice all round.
 

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Claiming that charging takes 'seconds', and density equivalent to current EVs.
This quote is made in every 'wonder' battery announcement (which happen about once a week now). Reading that line alone is enough to dismiss this as bollocks.

I just wish the press would stop reporting everyone who has made a small incremental advance in battery tech (most of which never make it to commercial production) as some kind of revolution.
 

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charging time is the achilles heel of EV ownerships.
Is it? I don't think it is, and optimising a storage media that is ill-suited to rapid charging is a waste of effort.

Why do we have to maintain the current paradigm?

Also super-capacitors are just as much of Golden Goose as Hydrogen, it may pay off after much money and years of effort - but its unlikely to make any inroads in the short term. We can build vehicles that meet the use case of 90%+ of people today with Li-Ion, way waste time and effort on speculative research.

On the real science of this breakthrough, there has been little to no peer reviewed literature to check the veracity of the claims.
 

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There might be some logic in looking again at battery swap technology. A properly designed car and system could change a flat battery for a full one in a minute or so. And if that then gave another 300 miles it would be a huge advantage. If all main dealers installed such a 'swap' drive through bay then that would give good coverage. And with all makes having compatible batteries. The battery would have to be leased of course to enable that to work and could still enable re-charge by plug in as normal to suit the situation. The 'swap' bays could then be co-located with charge bays to Rapid charge as usual if someone was able to wait that half hour. 24 hour service would be needed at such stations of course and the price to instant charge at a level to justify that facility.

The logistics of how many charged batteries to hold at any one location would soon settle down together with adequate re-charging facilities there to have enough available to swap on demand. A monthly rent could also be negotiated to cover the hardware itself plus unlimited 'swaps' on a scale to match the owners drive pattern. Overall, such a change linked to 300 mile range could finally overcome all nervous ICE owners buying reservations. IMO its worth re-examining.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Is it? I don't think it is.
On a 50 kW charger it is .. 30 minutes charge for around 60 miles of range is pretty tedious. (Talking from a Leaf perspective, I know Tesla superchargers are probably double that)

Having said that, the new generation CCS chargers (350 kW) will pretty much transform charging-times.. but being able to inject a full charge in a matter of moments would be incredibly convenient.

As others have said on here though, infrastructure would definitely be an issue... Injecting 24 / 30 / 60 / 100 kWh at high speed would demand a lot from the charger / energy supply ... although I guess they could buffer the energy in more capacitors at the charging station.

It'll be interesting to hear whether the chemistry is safer / easier to manufacture than Li/ion..
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This quote is made in every 'wonder' battery announcement (which happen about once a week now). Reading that line alone is enough to dismiss this as bollocks.
There arent *that* many announcements..

No need to be rude either, this is an electric car forum, if you don't expect people to be interested/excited by new battery technologies you are in the wrong forum.

Anything that makes batteries go further and charge faster is interesting to me.
 

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This quote is made in every 'wonder' battery announcement (which happen about once a week now). Reading that line alone is enough to dismiss this as bollocks.

I just wish the press would stop reporting everyone who has made a small incremental advance in battery tech (most of which never make it to commercial production) as some kind of revolution.
Ditto! Also the claim that it currently takes between 6 and 8 hours to charge an electric car is a flag that they know not of what they speak! My i3 takes 3 maybe 4 hours to charge at home, much less in other places!
 

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energy supply ... although I guess they could buffer the energy in more capacitors at the charging station.
BMW have/are putting several sites together using Second Life i3 batteries to buffer supply, this is a big plank of the the 350kW plan, you simply can't rely on an appropriately sized input supply to meet full demand - its cost prohibitive in many places.
 

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This quote is made in every 'wonder' battery announcement (which happen about once a week now). Reading that line alone is enough to dismiss this as bollocks.

I just wish the press would stop reporting everyone who has made a small incremental advance in battery tech (most of which never make it to commercial production) as some kind of revolution.
Dont know what you are talking about mate.
If you actually took the time to see the origination of said information you'd recognize the significance of it from such an established scientific source. You need to do more research before you make such silly pronouncements. The guys are scientists/ research fellows...clearly you are not so be more cautious in your reading and proclaiming.
 

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.................clearly you are not so be more cautious in your reading and proclaiming.
And perhaps that comment refers to you too. This may indeed be a breakthrough, but the laws of physics are still valid. To transfer enough energy 'in seconds' to enable a car to drive 250 miles is like also claiming that a petrol pump could transfer 30 litres in two seconds. With liquid that might be technically possible using a hose the diameter of a bucket but electricity is different. To transfer 60kWh of electricity in seconds is like firing a lightning bolt in there. And the cable bringing that power from the grid to the dispensing unit would need to be huge. And also have to go right back to the nearest sub station. The article that you are reading was written by journalists, not scientists, and you have done no fact checking before making your comments. A thing that you accuse others of.
 
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