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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day,

I was browsing internet but did not find any topics related to my question.

I have noticed that sometimes in power display arrow indicates consumption while the display in the middle indicates charging.
Can someone indicate why would this situation ever appear and if this is completely normal?
Photo is taken while driving in hybrid mode.

Thank you,
142544
 

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Good day,

I was browsing internet but did not find any topics related to my question.

I have noticed that sometimes in power display arrow indicates consumption while the display in the middle indicates charging.
Can someone indicate why would this situation ever appear and if this is completely normal?
Photo is taken while driving in hybrid mode.

Thank you,
View attachment 142544
Because the ICE is charging the battery and using power to propel the car forward.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It seems inefficient to say the le
Because the ICE is charging the battery and using power to propel the car forward.

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Why would car use electric energy and charge at the same time? Seems very inefficient.
 

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Is not using electricity and petrol to power the car; it is using petrol to move the car and charge the battery. The minus sign indicates the battery is being charged. In ev mode when you use B mode or go downhill you will see the same Charging and minus sign while the car regeneratively charges the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is not using electricity and petrol to power the car; it is using petrol to move the car and charge the battery. The minus sign indicates the battery is being charged. In ev mode when you use B mode or go downhill you will see the same Charging and minus sign while the car regeneratively charges the battery.
I’m trying to understand this fully - when charging, shouldn’t power meter (arrow) go to green area and indicate as charging (same as going downhill)?
I am a bit confused why would analog arrow indicate that the car is using power while the display show power recuperation.
 

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You are actively driving the car under power, so the needle is showing how much % power you are using (how hard you are pressing the accelerator pedal). Been section of for regen indication - it goes there when you brake and go down hill as you mentioned.
 

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It seems inefficient to say the le


Why would car use electric energy and charge at the same time? Seems very inefficient.
It can be efficient. In these cases the car is acting a bit like a normal, rather than a plug-in hybrid - what Toyota like to call a self-charging hybrid. An internal combustion engine when on is most efficient at a certain degree of revs/throttle. The car is cleverly programmed to balance using power from both ICE and electric motor. The electric motor acts as a torque filler and will be used more at low revs and gear changes. It is also used more when the car is under hard acceleration. If under lighter acceleration or constant speed spare power from the ICE is diverted to charge the battery. When slowing the car regenerates but if you have your foot a bit on the accelerator it will still use fuel. If you take your foot off completely off the accelerator there will be no fuel to the ICE and if it is well warmed up you have probably seen that the ICE stops.

VW cars have a number of different modes:
Battery charge is very inefficient as you suggest and not worth using in my opinion, as I know of no cities which have mandated EV only at their centre.

Hybrid mode tries to balance the use of ICE and electric to be most efficient. It will also aim to keep the level of electric charge at 3 miles so if you drop below that the ICE may be used more to charge the battery. There are a few variations on hybrid depending on year. So called four mode cars had a battery hold option which aimed to keep the batter at the same level and the hybrid mode would gradually run down the battery. I have a three mode car (which VW used in 2016/17 before reverting back to 4 modes) which doesn't have the battery hold. It's hybrid mode is somewhere between the two described above. Then later VW introduced integration of Sat-Nav data to the hybrid mode with the Golf Mk 7.5 GTE. (I am not sure when this was introduced on the Passat). This uses route and speed data to aim to use the ICE at the most appropriate times to arrive at the destination with zero battery left.

GTE mode behaves differently in terms of charging. It regenerates rather than coasts when you lift of the accelerator (but not as strongly as B-mode). It also aims to keep the battery charged at around 13 miles, using the ICE more to achieve this. While due to holding higher revs longer GTE mode usually uses more fuel there is one situations where use of GTE can be more efficient. If you are driving at constant speed on the motorway engaging GTE will charge the battery slowly but at the penalty of only a few mpg as it is mainly using spare torque from the ICE which is already at high revs. This then allows more battery available for EV-mode at a part of the journey later where it would be inefficient to run the ICE, such as low speed, start/stop driving, or if you know that you are restarting the journey later in town with a cold ICE. Often I find that getting to a motorway on EV uses more the half the battery, and I want battery available at the other end of the journey. Using this method gives a higher percentage of zero-emission EV miles and if timed right can be more efficient.

So going back to your original question as others have said the needle is a measure of power (from ICE and/or electric) being delivered to forward motion when positive and a measure of recuperation of energy to the battery when negative. But there are instances when some power to forward motion is being delivered from the ICE but also powering a small amount of battery regeneration. This can happen in hybrid modes where circumstances are right, but is more commonly seen in Battery charge and GTE modes as described above.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It can be efficient. In these cases the car is acting a bit like a normal, rather than a plug-in hybrid - what Toyota like to call a self-charging hybrid. An internal combustion engine when on is most efficient at a certain degree of revs/throttle. The car is cleverly programmed to balance using power from both ICE and electric motor. The electric motor acts as a torque filler and will be used more at low revs and gear changes. It is also used more when the car is under hard acceleration. If under lighter acceleration or constant speed spare power from the ICE is diverted to charge the battery. When slowing the car regenerates but if you have your foot a bit on the accelerator it will still use fuel. If you take your foot off completely off the accelerator there will be no fuel to the ICE and if it is well warmed up you have probably seen that the ICE stops.

VW cars have a number of different modes:
Battery charge is very inefficient as you suggest and not worth using in my opinion, as I know of no cities which have mandated EV only at their centre.

Hybrid mode tries to balance the use of ICE and electric to be most efficient. It will also aim to keep the level of electric charge at 3 miles so if you drop below that the ICE may be used more to charge the battery. There are a few variations on hybrid depending on year. So called four mode cars had a battery hold option which aimed to keep the batter at the same level and the hybrid mode would gradually run down the battery. I have a three mode car (which VW used in 2016/17 before reverting back to 4 modes) which doesn't have the battery hold. It's hybrid mode is somewhere between the two described above. Then later VW introduced integration of Sat-Nav data to the hybrid mode with the Golf Mk 7.5 GTE. (I am not sure when this was introduced on the Passat). This uses route and speed data to aim to use the ICE at the most appropriate times to arrive at the destination with zero battery left.

GTE mode behaves differently in terms of charging. It regenerates rather than coasts when you lift of the accelerator (but not as strongly as B-mode). It also aims to keep the battery charged at around 13 miles, using the ICE more to achieve this. While due to holding higher revs longer GTE mode usually uses more fuel there is one situations where use of GTE can be more efficient. If you are driving at constant speed on the motorway engaging GTE will charge the battery slowly but at the penalty of only a few mpg as it is mainly using spare torque from the ICE which is already at high revs. This then allows more battery available for EV-mode at a part of the journey later where it would be inefficient to run the ICE, such as low speed, start/stop driving, or if you know that you are restarting the journey later in town with a cold ICE. Often I find that getting to a motorway on EV uses more the half the battery, and I want battery available at the other end of the journey. Using this method gives a higher percentage of zero-emission EV miles and if timed right can be more efficient.

So going back to your original question as others have said the needle is a measure of power (from ICE and/or electric) being delivered to forward motion when positive and a measure of recuperation of energy to the battery when negative. But there are instances when some power to forward motion is being delivered from the ICE but also powering a small amount of battery regeneration. This can happen in hybrid modes where circumstances are right, but is more commonly seen in Battery charge and GTE modes as described above.
I could not find anything similar to this regard while searching on internet. Thank you for clarification, much appreciated!
 
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