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Wife currently has a contract hire Mini convertible (though my company) and it goes back shortly so I’ve kinda talked her into going ‘leccy for her next car and stumped up the £500 for a new MINI e, which should roll up next March. Except she’s never driven one (obviously), she is not really an early adopter, and she seems disinterested/ambivalent about the whole EV thing. She’s already said she won’t even test drive it. It seems quite well specc’ed and pre-heating will be good.

But, I’m thinking that the short range (probably 100 miles in the winter) plus the hassle of her remembering to plug it in and not being able to travel/fill-up as she goes has got me thinking that maybe a cheaper, end-of-an-era ICE car is a better bet. We do have a regular car, too (Subaru). I get a few company perks buying an EV car. She typically drive a few thousand a year, split mostly sub-15 mile trips but occasional longer trip which will force her to use the charging infrastructure (or take the Subaru).

I bought into the ’leccy thing a few year back, has anyone done the leccy thing and been disappointed? What’s the ‘leccy highway like for someone who is “dyed-in-the-wool” petrol user, or will she hate it?
 

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Charging a car every day is like charging your mobile, it’s just a routine task. It’s convenient to never have to go to a petrol station and always have a full charge in the morning.

Just accept that she’ll use the Subaru for long journeys as whilst you can do a long journey, the infrastructure simply isn’t up to scratch yet. That’s not to say it’s not possible. When I had an i3 I did a few long journeys and just factored in that some chargers might not be working.

The tax benefits from an EV are going to make it worth it though
 

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The key to life is in the question...
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Wife currently has a contract hire Mini convertible (though my company) and it goes back shortly so I’ve kinda talked her into going ‘leccy for her next car and stumped up the £500 for a new MINI e, which should roll up next March. Except she’s never driven one (obviously), she is not really an early adopter, and she seems disinterested/ambivalent about the whole EV thing. She’s already said she won’t even test drive it. It seems quite well specc’ed and pre-heating will be good.

But, I’m thinking that the short range (probably 100 miles in the winter) plus the hassle of her remembering to plug it in and not being able to travel/fill-up as she goes has got me thinking that maybe a cheaper, end-of-an-era ICE car is a better bet. We do have a regular car, too (Subaru). I get a few company perks buying an EV car. She typically drive a few thousand a year, split mostly sub-15 mile trips but occasional longer trip which will force her to use the charging infrastructure (or take the Subaru).

I bought into the ’leccy thing a few year back, has anyone done the leccy thing and been disappointed? What’s the ‘leccy highway like for someone who is “dyed-in-the-wool” petrol user, or will she hate it?
I think its just a "convenience thing" if you are used to an ICE..... If you are regularly doing 150+ mile round trips and you don't have the ability to rapid charge at destination, then maybe EV is not for you right now.

The BIK relaxation is noticeable in your salary, but I dont think I could go full EV yet given the poor / inconsistent infrastructure for the minimal savings vs. inconvenience factor.... Can you imagine the uproar from the motoring public if you regularly turned up to a petrol station as your car was nearly empty only to find out that you couldn't get any petrol from the pump...????

As MagicalTrevor said - Charging is just a routine task.... drive to the shops / work and plug in as soon as you get home, easy.... and if you are driving to Scotland, either use the 2nd car or accept that the journey will need planning and will take a bloody long time....

That said... 100 miles range from the "new" Mini E is pi55 poor.... and they are the only modern OEM still using 50kW systems.... if you wanted a small EV then their are many better ones out now than the Mini.... or if it has to be a Mini, then just pay the extra VED and get an ICE again... its only a couple of 100 £ a year and that's back of the sofa money
 

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I think its just a "convenience thing" if you are used to an ICE..... If you are regularly doing 150+ mile round trips and you don't have the ability to rapid charge at destination, then maybe EV is not for you right now.

The BIK relaxation is noticeable in your salary, but I dont think I could go full EV yet given the poor / inconsistent infrastructure for the minimal savings vs. inconvenience factor.... Can you imagine the uproar from the motoring public if you regularly turned up to a petrol station as your car was nearly empty only to find out that you couldn't get any petrol from the pump...????

As MagicalTrevor said - Charging is just a routine task.... drive to the shops / work and plug in as soon as you get home, easy.... and if you are driving to Scotland, either use the 2nd car or accept that the journey will need planning and will take a bloody long time....

That said... 100 miles range from the "new" Mini E is pi55 poor.... and they are the only modern OEM still using 50kW systems.... if you wanted a small EV then their are many better ones out now than the Mini.... or if it has to be a Mini, then just pay the extra VED and get an ICE again... its only a couple of 100 £ a year and that's back of the sofa money
Renault are still using 22kW AC as standard, with an expensive optional upgrade to 50kW CCS, which can't even be fitted to the cheapest Zoe.
The smallest battery variant of the VW ID.3 will also have 50kW CCS as standard, with an option to upgrade to 100kW.
 

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My wife wasn't interested in EVs either but was interested in a new car and spending less on fuel. She didn't drive the car before we ordered it, went from Polo to e-Golf.
Now she has an e-Golf and has no intention of going back to ice. She's actually become a bit of an EV evangelist and loves that she's driving a cleaner car, the smoothness and quietness.
She was concerned about the charging but very quickly it becomes second nature to plug in at the end of the day. I do occasionally have to plug it in when she intended to go out again but didn't so it isn't ready to charge but I'm the one who looks at the cars and checks they are plugged in each night.
Longer trips require planning and take longer but if you have an ice then that will be the simple option.
 

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I would get the new Zoe instead with the optional CCS charger upgrade, it will have a realistic range of 200 miles (52kWh pack) and has the bonus of 22kWh AC charging as a backup in case the CCS chargers are not working. AC 22 kWh infrastructure is currently better than CCS on Ecotricity rapids, otherwise you'll have to come off the Motorway and go in search of Polar Rapids which are more reliable for CCS with the Mini-e. Only thing missing from the Zoe is it doesn't have adaptive cruise control, but if you've never had it you won't miss it and the current Zoe cruise control works quite well so not the end of the world. Other downsides, because the Zoe pack is force air cooled using the climate AC your limited to 50 kWh CCS charging but to be honest most chargers are only 50 kWh anyway so its a mute point.
 

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For anyone interested in seeing the new MINI Electric this year, ahead of the launch in March 2020 you can come and see the car at the Knights North Staffordshire MINI exclusive preview. One day only - Sunday 6th October. Book a lot here: https://registermini.co.uk/knightsnorthstaffordshire-electric/

There will be a knowledgeable team of people there to discuss any queries you might have.
 

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I went through the exact same experience with my wife. She had a Golf 7 R at the time.

Practically had to drag her into the BMW showroom to pick up the i3 demonstrator they’d loaned us for 3 days to try.

Completely disinterested in electric cars. Worried about plugging in at home and running out of electrons/Not being able to go where she wanted to.

She literally drove for 5 miles on the way home before asking if all the colours could be seen on the website.

She now won’t shut up to friends about her amazing car, the acceleration, and the money she’s saving on fuel. Completely in love.
Got into the routine of plugging it in every night when I explained it meant she could come out to a cool car in the Summer and a warm car in winter that wouldn’t need its screen scraping!

Did 30,000 miles in 2 years in the first i3 and just replaced it with an i3S. Now she wants a Tesla Model 3.

Actually, I’d recommend borrowing an i3 from BMW for a few days test drive. They will do this so you can see how it fits into your life.

The i3 is way bigger inside than the Mini, as much fun to drive if not more (rear wheel drive), has better range than the Mini and it’s quicker.

A 2019 car with about 2,000 miles on the clock can be bought from a BMW main dealer for about £20k odd.
 

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I'd like a nearly new i3 for £20k, how do you get a deal like that?
I said “£20k odd”.

Kept my eye on the BMWi & Tesla Inventory site which aggregates almost every single used example listed at dealers and as private sales in one place.

Last month bought a Fluid Black, 8 month old i3S with 2,200 miles on the clock for £26,500. Cost £41,250 new.

At the time there were 3 other S’s listed at main dealers, a few months old, some with 100 miles. One, bought by a member on this board, had I think 1,500 miles and was listed at £23,500.

Think the cheapest 2019 i3 on there at the mo is £25k
 

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I said “£20k odd”.

Kept my eye on the BMWi & Tesla Inventory site which aggregates almost every single used example listed at dealers and as private sales in one place.

Last month bought a Fluid Black, 8 month old i3S with 2,200 miles on the clock for £26,500. Cost £41,250 new.

At the time there were 3 other S’s listed at main dealers, a few months old, some with 100 miles. One, bought by a member on this board, had I think 1,500 miles and was listed at £23,500.

Think the cheapest 2019 i3 on there at the mo is £25k
Do you have a link or can you give me the web address cheers
 
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