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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it was going to happen sooner or later but today we picked up a puncture after about 6k miles.
Nothing special there but as I have the ability, tools and materials to repair the puncture myself and in view of stories about the difficulty of jacking up without damaging the battery I thought some might be interested in how it went.

So, jacked up quite straightforwardly on the clear jacking point. Nuts loosened and wheel off.
Onto my tyre changer and the tyre came off very easily. The Primacy 4 is a very supple tyre.

Puncture in centre of tread, screw still there, no secondary damage and tyre never went below 30psi. Removed screw, prepared and repaired with a plug patch.
Refitted, again a doddle with the flexibility of the Michelin.

Dual plane balanced with adhesive weights rather than one knock on weight on the inner rim and one adhesive.
Back on car and torqued up.
Quick run down the road, still showing TPMS warning for maybe 150m when everything reset and correct figures show.

So, no need to worry about damaging anything as far as I’m concerned and nothing out of the ordinary for any decent tyre shop.
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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Thanks. It's encouraging to hear that. I think... It's the only gripe I have with the e-Niro (and other EVs that don't come with a spare tyre and a jack). I am still haunted by the idea I can find myself on a dark and rainy night with a sudden puncture that of course cannot be repaired using the supplied gunk. I have only had 3 flats in my life, and two of them were at inconvenient moments that would have turned into minor catastrophies had I not been able to swap the tyre there and then.
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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I’ve had way more flats than 3! I’ve lost count :rolleyes:

Before even taking delivery I had bought a full steel wheel spare with tyre, wheelbrace and scissor Jack. First thing I did when I got the car was rip out the useless gunk sealant thing, compressor and all the foam fittings and fitted the proper spare wheel. I may be old fashioned and slightly paranoid but I just couldn't drive a car anywhere without knowing I have a functional spare wheel. IMHO spare wheels should be completely mandatory! Peter.
 

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I picked up a similar puncture 2 weeks ago in my e-Niro’s N/S rear, middle of the tread and only went down by about 10psi, guess it was as it went in, - local garage fixed it in 10mins for just £12 with a guarantee - they had no problems using the rear jacking point.
 

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I do not understand why anyone drives a car without self sealing tyres?

I have used this MAGIK SEAL ATF-6/112A AUTOMOBILE TIRE SEALANT 4-PACK 96274 | eBay for years, although I can’t find a UK supplier at the moment, I still have 10 tubes ready for use in the garage.

I have had numerous punctures that have had no effect whatsoever - tyre doesn’t lose even 1psi of pressure.

Often I don’t even know I HAVE a puncture until the garage tells me, I just pull it out / unscrew it, and off I go.

Record was 10 nails/screws in one tyre at MOT time, just pulled them out and carried on - brilliant stuff. Lasts the life of the tyre.

No link to the seller other than as a happy customer. It even works on punctures at the very edge of tread, up slightly into sidewall, although if I get one there I do replace the tyre for safety reasons.
 

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Kia e-Niro 2 LR, Seat Mii
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Before even taking delivery I had bought a full steel wheel spare with tyre, wheelbrace and scissor Jack. First thing I did when I got the car was rip out the useless gunk sealant thing, compressor and all the foam fittings and fitted the proper spare wheel.
Have I read this right? I don't have an e-Niro yet (should be here in a couple of weeks) but I've seen pictures/videos showing a lot of plastic foam under the back floor sitting in what looked distinctly like a wheel well.
Are you saying that there is space for a full size spare wheel there, because if there is, that is very good news and unusual for an EV, and my wife (who is a bit of a worrier) will be over the moon. I was hoping for the possibilty of cramming in a space saver wheel at best...
 

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Kia e-Niro 2 LR, Seat Mii
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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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Have I read this right? I don't have an e-Niro yet (should be here in a couple of weeks) but I've seen pictures/videos showing a lot of plastic foam under the back floor sitting in what looked distinctly like a wheel well.
Are you saying that there is space for a full size spare wheel there, because if there is, that is very good news and unusual for an EV, and my wife (who is a bit of a worrier) will be over the moon. I was hoping for the possibilty of cramming in a space saver wheel at best...
Yes just enough space. See thread from last year. Peter.....
 

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https://okosales.co.uk/ seems to be a UK supplier. UK made genuine OKO brand too, apparently.
Here’s one truly excellent reason for NOT ever putting that horrible stuff in our tyres. Straight from their own (somewhat self biased) Q and A page.....

“Is OKO compatible with TPMS?
Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems that rely upon a sensor inside the tyre can become coated by the sealant and will not give a correct pressure reading.”

Furthermore, straight from their product details page.....
“Not recommended for use on V, W, Y or Z rated tyres or in Low Profile tyres of 40 profile or less.

If a Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) is fitted that has a sensor inside the tyre, it may be difficult to fit sealant through the narrow valve stem: or sealant may coat the sensor and give a false reading. Check compatibility with your manufacturer.”

Tyre fitters will deffo charge extra for cleaning it off the rims when replacing a tyre! Replacing all the gunged up knackered TPMS sensors will also be a pretty costly job. If it’s really as magically good (and safe) as they say, why don’t all cars have it factory fitted by legal mandate?

I wouldn’t touch it with a barge pole, even if it was completely FOC!! Peter.
 
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I’ve had way more flats than 3! I’ve lost count :rolleyes:

Before even taking delivery I had bought a full steel wheel spare with tyre, wheelbrace and scissor Jack. First thing I did when I got the car was rip out the useless gunk sealant thing, compressor and all the foam fittings and fitted the proper spare wheel. I may be old fashioned and slightly paranoid but I just couldn't drive a car anywhere without knowing I have a functional spare wheel. IMHO spare wheels should be completely mandatory! Peter.
Done exactly the same as you, I had 3 punctures in 2 years. Full size wheel and 3 tonne scissor jack for emergencies. Trolley jack for home use. Not noticed any difference in range or efficiency had 280 miles winter up to 320 miles in summer. Peace of mind, even if RAC fit it I would have the choice of new tyre and not be held to ransom by mobile tyre fitters.
 

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Here’s one truly excellent reason for NOT ever putting that horrible stuff in our tyres. Straight from their own (somewhat self biased) Q and A page.....

“Is OKO compatible with TPMS?
Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems that rely upon a sensor inside the tyre can become coated by the sealant and will not give a correct pressure reading.”

Tyre fitters will deffo charge extra for cleaning it off the rims when replacing a tyre! Replacing all the gunged up knackered TPMS sensors will also be a pretty costly job. If it’s really as magically good (and safe) as they say, why don’t all cars have it factory fitted by mandate?

I wouldn’t touch it with a barge pole, even if it was completely FOC!! Peter.
Whereas the stuff I used IS comparable with TPMS, is water soluble, and why would you ever wash it out anyhow? It stays in the tyre for the life of the tyre. You don’t ever take the tyre off the rim - even if you get a nail/screw in the tyre, you just can just pull it out ( or leave it there ).

If you won’t touch it with a barge pole, you’ll never know how good it is will you 😉. Rate up to 100mph, seals holes up to 6mm (which is massively more than it will ever need to do) and in the event of a catastrophic cut, will massively reduce the rate of deflation allowing you to stop safely.

Even if it did go up the tpms, so what? We managed without tpms for donkeys years, however it’s never once affected mine.

You are confusing it with the stuff you put in AFTER a puncture - this stuff you put in just after you fit the new tyre.

Why wouldn’t they put it in at the factory? Because there is a lot of money in new tyres..... because some people don’t like the idea..... the main one is, because after putting it in you have to drive for 30min and you can’t do that on a production line.....

Ive used it for over 20 years on over 10 different cars (probably 20 including family members) and not one of us has ever had to have a puncture repair, or any kind of inconvenience with puncture. My sister drove over a piece of razor sharp metal in the road that cut a 3” slash in her tyre, and it took an hour to go down - the tyre was ruined anyhow, but she got to a tyre fitters easily.... that would have been an awful blowout without it.
 

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......Even if it did go up the tpms, so what? We managed without tpms for donkeys years, however it’s never once affected mine.
Having correctly working TPMS is now mandatory by law. Also it’s damned useful too.
Anyway, I wish you all the best with your gunged up tyres, but it’s not for me (and I suspect not for most other drivers too!). Peter.

EDIT (In response to your edit) I certainly am not confusing it with the temporary repair after puncture stuff, as you just stated. Can you actually read my mind too? Remarkable skills of perception you seem to have, but unfortunately they are quite inaccurate. I fully understand the said stuff is a prophylactic compound. It probably does work but it’s just not for me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
After almost 30 years in the tyre industry I grew tired (!) of the discussions about sealants.

Each to their own but I wouldn’t use it. A puncture that causes a sudden deflation in a tubeless tyre isn’t going to be sealed by any sealant I ever saw and I’d rather rely on the active TPMS and regular inspection.

As mentioned earlier most punctures don’t see the tyre going down that quickly and a timely TPMS warning will enable you to get home or to a repairer easily enough.

One issue with sealants is that they lead to blissful neglect (as is evident in this thread) of the tyres, which is why TPMS came about in the first place. But that’s another story…….
 

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After almost 30 years in the tyre industry I grew tired (!) of the discussions about sealants.

Each to their own but I wouldn’t use it. A puncture that causes a sudden deflation in a tubeless tyre isn’t going to be sealed by any sealant I ever saw and I’d rather rely on the active TPMS and regular inspection.

As mentioned earlier most punctures don’t see the tyre going down that quickly and a timely TPMS warning will enable you to get home or to a repairer easily enough.

One issue with sealants is that they lead to blissful neglect (as is evident in this thread) of the tyres, which is why TPMS came about in the first place. But that’s another story…….
Wise words - always been my mantra especially as an ex caravaner who always used TPMS on the caravan too.......


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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As mentioned earlier most punctures don’t see the tyre going down that quickly and a timely TPMS warning will enable you to get home or to a repairer easily enough.
Yes, I think I read recently on this forum that TPMS will often give you a useful early warning long before you're out of action with a flat tyre.
Previously I thought TPMS was just a handy way of checking the pressures were right so you didn't wear the tyres out prematurely.
 

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If a Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) is fitted that has a sensor inside the tyre, it may be difficult to fit sealant through the narrow valve stem: or sealant may coat the sensor and give a false reading. Check compatibility with your manufacturer.”
Related: does the gunk supplied with the car for roadside leak fixing also jam up the TPMS sensor, adding the cost of a new TPMS sensor to the expense of a new tyre?
Yet another reason never to use the stuff if so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
#16 Just the opposite actually. Early TPMS simply warned when the pressure dropped below a certain figure, measured directly of calculated by comparing wheel rotation speeds on the same axle.
Then the direct systems (with the valves) quickly developed to show the pressure in each wheel (and temperature in some cases) though indirect systems still only offer a low pressure indication.
The direct systems are much more accurate at indicating loss of pressure. In the Kia’s case the warning happened at 30psi. 18 hours later the pressure was down to 27 and I inflated to 36 till I could repair later that day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
#17 Unlikely to damage the sensor as long as it’s cleaned reasonably quickly. Permanent sealants can sometimes just seal over the sensors and stop them working, they can still be cleaned but, of course, you’re unlikely to. Unless you get fed up of the car warning you the TPMS is down.
An issue with the get you home sealants, or any other sealant in truth, is that they’re a bitch to clean out. They’re water soluble but you need an awful lot of water to wash them out and you really don’t want that stuff down the drain so what do you do with it?
Then when it’s cleaned out you’re left with a wet tyre that will take a few days to dry before it can be properly repaired. Ever tried to get the last few ml of water out of a tyre?!
That’s why most tyre repairers, and any worth their salt, won’t entertain repairing tyres that have had sealant in them. Not to mention that most owners won’t wait days to get their tyre back.
Most tyres that get brought to repairers with sealant get replaced. The old tyre then eventually finds it way to the used tyre market.
The manufacturers really don’t avoid sealants because they want to sell more tyres. Some of them do indeed sell tyres with sealant already in them. However they also strongly recommend regular inspection and early permanent repair of any punctures.
There are so many downsides to sealants that they’re a no go for me but as I said earlier, each to their own. It’s fine to say ‘I’ve been using them for 20 years and never had a problem”. I’ve been driving for more decades than I care to remember and the only time I’ve been stranded with a puncture was in 2016 in my wife’s SLK when the sealant provided failed to seal the quite small puncture and we needed to be recovered home.
Be lucky!!
 

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I’ve had way more flats than 3! I’ve lost count :rolleyes:

Before even taking delivery I had bought a full steel wheel spare with tyre, wheelbrace and scissor Jack. First thing I did when I got the car was rip out the useless gunk sealant thing, compressor and all the foam fittings and fitted the proper spare wheel. I may be old fashioned and slightly paranoid but I just couldn't drive a car anywhere without knowing I have a functional spare wheel. IMHO spare wheels should be completely mandatory! Peter.
Which spare tyre did you get? Thanks
 
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