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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20
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I wouldn’t have an issue with the 32a
The fact it’s a 63amp AC rcd is a problem in my opinion, AC rcds are prone to ignoring DC issues and shouldn’t be used with chargers.
Also if your main fuse is 100a your tails should not be 16mm2 but upgraded to 25mm2
To be compliant I believe you need DC protection somewhere, but this is now dealt with by the charge points on most cases, rather than needing an expensive rcd. I presume that the case with the podpoint.
 

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My PodPoint Solo is installed thus:

Incoming supply » 100A service fuse » meter » DP isolator » Henley block tail splitter » dedicated mini-CU with 40A type-C breaker » Pod Point (the right way up).

This charger draws the full 6.6kW when charging my LEAF (I measure this by counting the flashes on the meter) and just over 7kW with an I-PACE I borrowed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Have you looked at the physical settings in the unit? If they are indeed set to 0010-1 I think you‘ll find the unit is set to limit the draw to 2.4kWh if there is only one phase connected, it’ll need three phases connected to allow 7.2kWh with the switches in 0010 The individual switches do not correspond to anything in the table next to it, they are a four digit code to set the upper limit, with an additional tethered(1)/non tethered(0) switch. The table is just telling you what it’s upper limit is and as such what is the minimum install requirements for that setting.
Yeah, there was a hint of sarcasm in that message - it never comes across right on a forum :oops: ! Two qualified electricians appear to not understand the difference between three phase and single phase, and set my jumpers to 7.2kw for 3 phase... Not my single phase supply. To be fair, they may have changed the Jumper settings after I saw the board - but I'm not feeling confident!
 

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ID3 Life
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Yeah, there was a hint of sarcasm in that message - it never comes across right on a forum :oops: ! Two qualified electricians appear to not understand the difference between three phase and single phase, and set my jumpers to 7.2kw for 3 phase... Not my single phase supply. To be fair, they may have changed the Jumper settings after I saw the board - but I'm not feeling confident!
Ah yes, Internet forums aka discussions without tone or context 🙄😂
 

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I have just had a Pod Point Solo 7.2kW charger installed, and I have had a few problems with the install.. They installed the unit on it's side. Literally, as in 90 degrees out. The stripe is horizontal. They didn't clip the load balancing sensor on properly - it dropped off, and they also forgot to commission the unit. Simple stuff? Dunno. Sign-off and building regs aside, I could have done a better job!

The trouble is, the issues with what I can see make me suspicious about what I can't see.

A quick inspection shows the high amperage cables are terminated reasonably well with no copper exposed etc.

However, I'm not fully convinced with the cable/fuse/promised charging wattage - can I ask other users what setups they have? And if it gives a reliable 7.2kw charge when there are no other heavy loads in the house? My EV doesn't arrive until next week at the earliest, so I can't test anything properly until then.

My incoming supply has a 100a fuse.
I have a dedicated EV Consumer Unit plumbed straight into my meter with 16mm tails.
The dedicated EV CU includes a 63A Type A RCD.
OK so far.
But, I have a type B 32A breaker supplying the Pod Point.
I then have ~35m 6mm SWA running mostly buried underground to my garage
Where I have a 32A double pole isolating switch
Just before the Pod Point unit

Load balancing is enabled and wired up.

I need the full 7.2kW, and I was quoted for a 7.2kW charger.

My calcs leave very little headroom - 7.2kw @ 230v is pretty much 32A, depending on the voltage supplied by the grid. Under voltage may push above the 32A of the breaker.

The Pod Point installation guide suggests a 40A breaker for a 7.2kw charge. A 40A breaker on a 35m long 6mm SWA seems a bit fine cut depending on the source used.

It might be OK, but I feel a need to double check their calculations tally with other EV charger installs! Whilst it's a bit dramatic... My CU and incoming supply is under the stairs, so if the worst was to happen, not only will any fire impact my house, it will also stop me escaping without jumping out of a window...
The charger onboard the car will be current limited, as will the EVSE so forget about watts other than for notional calculations. In other words, if when the voltage drops to 207v, amps doesn't go up to compensate.
 

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E-Van ponderer
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1. Unit wrong way round & location of unit (not where we agreed)
2. Ability to get as near to 7.2KW as the car will permit
3. MCB/RCDs
4. Jumpers (they look wrong, and it's not my job to fix them!)
5. They need to actually commission it!
6. The installation certificate errors
7. Are they confident on the 6mm SWA? Did they guess 6mm, or do they know 6mm.
Thats quite a few things to address! :/

For No7 I doubt they calculated it specifically, but 6mm SWA is of a much higher specification than 6mm Twin&Earth that you might have to your cooker. If they did calculate it, they may have found that 4mm SWA would be quite happy, but for the sake of £30 thowing in 6mm for everything up to a certain length with nothing weird going on gives good test results (assuming they tested it!) and will work for pretty much everything so only one real in the van. Hence survey questions about distance to charger etc..

There are so many complaints and grumbles about EV charging on one of the professinal forums I follow. The regulations have been a bit like moving goal posts, the information from dealerships has been misleading to dangerous, the EV installation industry seems to be mostly about quantity not quality. Like most electical work, the principle is a doddle, its just the details that are hard.

The install on my drive is acceptable, but the the paperwork is only 1/2 complete. Not sure if thats the install guys of the Head office for not sending it out.
 

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Incoming supply » 100Afuse » meter » DP isolator » Henley block tail splitter » dedicated mini consumer unit with 40A type-C breaker » Pod Point (the right way up) Current sense clamp is also attached.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Thanks everyone for your replies! I have heard back from my sparky and I'm pleased with their replies.

Amongst other details:
  • 6mm SWA is sufficient for the 32A load of the charger. Perhaps we should have gone for 10mm? Time will tell. I'll watch the charge-rates and see if it trips when under full load for long durations.
  • 32A breaker. This was chosen because of the 6mm SWA. Logical choice. 40A would mean the ~38A capability of the 6mm SWA would become the fuse under fail conditions. 40A MCB would need 10mm SWA. Again, time will tell if the breaker pops frequently on long charges. At least it is a safe rating and the mini CU is isolated from the rest of the house, so will only take itself out.
  • Type AC RCD. Getting replaced with a type A. It seems like it arrived that way from Hager. Perhaps they shipped the wrong unit and he didn't check the type?
  • The Jumpers are set to a paper addendum included with the unit. They are an otherwise undocumented setting to allow a the ceiling to be set remotely, or by the charge monitor. It's a feature of the newer Solo units, and the instructions don't yet reflect that.
  • Orientation and position........... Going to be sorted. I can see why the lad installing it (not the main electrician) put it that way. It suggests he didn't look at the instructions, or the huge up arrow on the screw-template. Pod Point isn't their usual unit, but that should have made them read the instructions more clearly? Hey ho. It's getting sorted. Water under the bridge if it's all sorted.
Apparently there are some contradictions between the Pod Point instructions and the latest wiring standards which is what caused some of these things I have noticed. Possibly down to the difference between getting a standard Pod Point installer, and an electrician to install a Pod Point? I guess if PP insist on 10mm, 40A, they are reducing the number of callouts for popped MCBs in crowded, or otherwise warm installations. Perhaps worrying if a 6mm SWA (or heaven forbid, a non SWA!) is installed with a 40A MCB, which looks allowable under the PP instructions.

At least I now know loads more about my install and setup, as well as the rest of my house's electrics.

A (probably overdue anyway) optical/heat combined smoke alarm is on it's way for the under-stair meter cupboard, and I'm seriously considering installing a fire-proof plasterboard lining in there too. It won't stop the fire spreading fully, but should buy us a bit more time should something go wrong.
 
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