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Comparing the number of Rapid's to petrol stations is meaningless due to the time taken to refuel 5-10 as long, and one car at a time compared to many.
The issue remains that most people need to use a rapid occasionally rather than regularly, and will supply keep up with demand? So far it mainly has, but the switch is in its infancy with most early adopters doing relatively short journeys and mainly charging at home. Come the greater adoption the high mileage and people without home parking need to be accommodated.
 

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There are already more RAPID public charging pumps than petrol stations
As well as dk6780's point above, now recalculate how many of these rapid chargers are actually working?

Every time I look, Zap Map is just a sea of red markers to say they're having problems. Some areas are worse than others but on the whole they are far less reliable than a fuel pump.
 

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As well as dk6780's point above, now recalculate how many of these rapid chargers are actually working?

Every time I look, Zap Map is just a sea of red markers to say they're having problems. Some areas are worse than others but on the whole they are far less reliable than a fuel pump.
I’m not sure that’s the case. I know our local Tesco manager and he has pump maintenance bills several times a week - usually just for one at a time though out of 12 (and he has same day swift service).
 

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... The demand/supply of petrol is very price sensitive and i do not envisage any different for EV charging.
I think it will be completely different.

I would guess the price of petrol pumps is low compared to the value of the stuff going through them, whereas this is reversed for electricity.
 

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I think it will be completely different.

I would guess the price of petrol pumps is low compared to the value of the stuff going through them, whereas this is reversed for electricity.
You would hope that a charger could be made more reliable than a fluid pump though.

I amazed by the growing trend of slinging the cable on the ground as the user leaves.

Analogous to leaving trash in a rough circle after using the park I guess.
 

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I’m not sure that’s the case. I know our local Tesco manager and he has pump maintenance bills several times a week - usually just for one at a time though out of 12 (and he has same day swift service).
Oh. I didn't consider that second possibility. The idea that both need regular maintenance but one gets far more care and attention from its owners than the other. That would actually make sense given how clean and well presented fuel pumps are, compared to the state of let's say Ecotricity's chargers.

(That's not even a dig at Ecotricity. BP's chargers can spend weeks at a time not working and looking totally filthy too. And with them you can give a direct comparison within the same brand of the level of care between one and the other)
 

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Oh. I didn't consider that second possibility. The idea that both need regular maintenance but one gets far more care and attention from its owners than the other. That would actually make sense given how clean and well presented fuel pumps are, compared to the state of let's say Ecotricity's chargers.

(That's not even a dig at Ecotricity. BP's chargers can spend weeks at a time not working and looking totally filthy too. And with them you can give a direct comparison within the same brand of the level of care between one and the other)
He has the service team geared up as he knows for certain that customers on the way out of the store swing on by if there are significant queues for the pumps. It’s a significant part of their income so he needs it available and frictionless. The vast majority pay at the pump by card too with this fraction having increased recently for obvious reasons.
 

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But you're in and out of a fuel station in a few minutes. Someone could be plugged in to a rapid charger for more than half a hour. Not to mention the fact that most places have far fewer chargers than the average fuel station has pumps. Not really comparable.
I was kind of joking but queueing either in a physical layout or electronically via an app or a combination of the two is not beyond the wit of man.
 

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Oh. I didn't consider that second possibility. The idea that both need regular maintenance but one gets far more care and attention from its owners than the other. That would actually make sense given how clean and well presented fuel pumps are, compared to the state of let's say Ecotricity's chargers.

(That's not even a dig at Ecotricity. BP's chargers can spend weeks at a time not working and looking totally filthy too. And with them you can give a direct comparison within the same brand of the level of care between one and the other)
Note also that petrol stations have to contend with Trading Standards turning up at any time to check they're not shortchanging fuel customers. There is (I think) no similar requirement for chargepoints.
 

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The irritation i guess comes with parallel queuing, especially when the dwell time is unknown and highly variable. I much prefer a single series queue, feeding into multiple service points, much fairer and less frustrating.

With a fuel station, or supermarket or whatever, there are multiple parallel queues, and while we might sometimes pick a queue that looks okay, and it turns out its got the slowest cashier in the universe operating it, or the person in front is doing their entire grocery shop in the petrol station kiosk etc, generally its sorted out fairly quickly and your thru in a minute or two, even if it feels like eons at the time.

Chargers on the other hand are different due to the time. Many chargers have two bays, an if you arrive and find people charging, often you'll pull in next to them to wait. But if you happen to pull in next to the guy thats trickle charging it all the way to 99.9%, and someone else turns up after you, waits in the other bay, and that other guy finishes first and leaves, its a bit more grating when that person has in effect "jumped the queue"... While he may not even have been aware of the issue.

Unfortunately because chargers are often shoehorned into existing facilities, theres almost never room to create a proper series queue.
 

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Agree shouldn't compare chargers with fuel stations. We are not comparing charger locations with fuel locations rather the individual numbers of chargers c/w numbers of fuel pumps which there are more of the latter. The UK lags behind other countries. Shanghai has 41K chargers for 24 million people. We have ?8500-9000 in UK for 60+ million? China has 4.5 million chargers total.

I wouldn't worry long term about numbers of chargers. Battery technology is moving so fast. Look at size of batteries now in other areas c/w past. Mobile batteries were huge to power a simple phone, now they're tiny and power smartphones which are essentially computers. I'm sure there will be a time when batteries become the size of 12v ones and can be lifted out of boot. That way we can carry a spare or 2 charged up or pop into a "station" to leave discharged one and pop in freshly charged one. It has to be this way. Can't long term have a battery as part of chassis and currently guaranteed for 8 years or 100,000 miles. Who wants to pay 80K for TMX or 200K for Roadster to bin it after 8 years?

It will change as prices drop further. 10 years ago it was $1500/kWh to manufacture the battery, now about $150 and in 2023 $100.
 
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