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Hi, I'm blessed to live in a country with abundant piped water supplies, even in dry summers. I still harvest a little amount of rain water, just for the birdbath and garden.

For emergency supplies for drinking, I keep about 10 2 litre plastic bottles in the basement.

A few years ago, when there was some power issues that could affect water treatment / pumping we keep some addition large buckets outside filled with water for loo flushing.

Anyone else do stuff like this?
 

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This is one of the benefits of having a cold water tank in the roof, as you always have a constantly refreshed store of water should something happen to the main supply, however many people remove it with the installation of combiner's boilers etc.

I used to be very interested in "prepping" and "off grid living" in my 20's but I still have problems with my thoughts and beliefs, its a very interesting subject once you drill into what your trying to accomplish.
 

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I have a bed of very thirsty Hydrangeas by my front window, plus some potted conifers by the front door. To water these, I constructed a timber frame just inside the garage door to support a 210 litre water butt, about 1.2m above the floor. This is fed by 22 mm overflow pipe leading from a connector on the garage downpipe. The tap of the water butt is connected to a Hozelock timer and thence to some drip hose leading to my plants. The timer comes on for ten minutes every evening, and uses about 10 litres of water, so I have a max storage of 3 weeks supply.

The Hydrangeas look amazing all summer, though I have to water manually maybe 10 days a year when the water has run out.
 

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This is one of the benefits of having a cold water tank in the roof, as you always have a constantly refreshed store of water should something happen to the main supply, however many people remove it with the installation of combiner's boilers etc.

I used to be very interested in "prepping" and "off grid living" in my 20's but I still have problems with my thoughts and beliefs, its a very interesting subject once you drill into what your trying to accomplish.
You should never drink water from that tank without boiling it first and then I would only in an emergency. Working in construction has show me some really discussing things in those tanks.
 

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You should never drink water from that tank without boiling it first and then I would only in an emergency. Working in construction has show me some really discussing things in those tanks.
Agreed. And consider getting some water treatment tablets if you want to drink from your water butt too. It's still been running over your roof and gutters to get there.

I do intend to store rainwater, mainly for the garden. But I'm waiting for the house to be rendered and painted before I start making changes to the downpipe routing.
 

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You should never drink water from that tank without boiling it first and then I would only in an emergency. Working in construction has show me some really discussing things in those tanks.
Sorry I did not clarify that!

Agreed, I do not DRINK the water from the tank as is, but agreed if I did intend to drink it in an emergency I'd boil it.

Our cold bath tap and toilet are the only things run from the cold tank, so its handy to have that store to wash with and flush the toilet.
 

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1 word... Legionella. Don't store water if you don't need to.
 
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Couple of winters ago we were effected by the freezing temperatures and and our supply was off for 5 days. The tank in the loft was large enough to keep the loo flushing ect, and we used bottled water supplied by the water company for drinking.
 

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Couple of winters ago we were effected by the freezing temperatures and and our supply was off for 5 days. The tank in the loft was large enough to keep the loo flushing ect, and we used bottled water supplied by the water company for drinking.
An interesting scenario. All well and good capturing rainwater, but it also likely freeze in such an event.
 

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I have a couple of IBC tanks totalling 1800 lts which I use for garden watering and pressure washing etc. I have bought fittings to connect more down pipes so the tanks fill up more regularly which I plan to install during the lock down. My diverters from the down pipes incorporate leaf filters and then a first flush device which should remove the vast majority of dust and pollen from the water collected. The tanks are wrapped in heavy black DPM to prevent algy growth. I have purchased a pump and plan to connect the toilets so we can flush with rainwater during the winter when the water is not used in the garden. The pump will have a 5 micron filter on the output to further remove debris. There is plenty of info and youtube videos on rainwater harvesting if people are interested.
 

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I have a couple of IBC tanks totalling 1800 lts which I use for garden watering and pressure washing etc. I have bought fittings to connect more down pipes so the tanks fill up more regularly which I plan to install during the lock down. My diverters from the down pipes incorporate leaf filters and then a first flush device which should remove the vast majority of dust and pollen from the water collected. The tanks are wrapped in heavy black DPM to prevent algy growth. I have purchased a pump and plan to connect the toilets so we can flush with rainwater during the winter when the water is not used in the garden. The pump will have a 5 micron filter on the output to further remove debris. There is plenty of info and youtube videos on rainwater harvesting if people are interested.
I'd love to see some pictures. I've recently become interested in rainwater harvesting, having moved to the sticks, but haven't yet got my head around all the plumbing required.

I came across this link which some may find useful: Tanks Size Calculator - RainWater Harvesting Ltd
Apparently a garden needs 200l+ per day to water.
 

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I'd love to see some pictures. I've recently become interested in rainwater harvesting, having moved to the sticks, but haven't yet got my head around all the plumbing required.

I came across this link which some may find useful: Tanks Size Calculator - RainWater Harvesting Ltd
Apparently a garden needs 200l+ per day to water.
Trevor a cut a paste reply to your question about my setup on the solar sceptics thread. Ah, just seen you have given it a thumbs up over there

Sure, will start an off topic thread for detail with photos. I am a customer BTW, of Tangent (Fuel Included) installed my 4.2kw of Solar in 2019. It's a basic simple system that daisychains several garden waterbutts together feed and return. A small household civil engineering project if you like. I haven't gone so far as adding potable water filtration yet, as its for emergency use only, if anything causes the local water treatment plant to go down for long periods, in which case people would drink for rivers, lakes, ponds and old wells again out of desperation. 3 days without water is the start of the danger area.

Everything came from National DIY stores , plumbers merchants , national hardware stores (Screwfix + Toolstation) and Amazon. Main tank is a 250L waterbutt which is then feed and return connected via gravity to several smaller 100 ltr tanks. All pipework and fittings are WRAS pottable water approved that would be used in any newbuild house to supply drinking water. What makes it not dirt cheap is each tank has one of those silver antimicrobial disks for fish tanks in it (off Amazon) and these 100% prevent bacteria growth in the rainwater, even the main 250ltr tank which has been in since early Feb now and full since mid Feb has no bacteria growth I can notice, and the rainwater is still fresh and clear and recently drinking a cup untreated didn't give me Delly Belly.

Also have devised a simple and cheap pumping system to extract it a speed and over moderate distance into the house to aid gravity and also enable use to the last few litres that lay just below the taps gravity line.

If used would be basically filtered and boiled for cooking and drinking, and if not needed and we have another 1976 / 2018 summer can be put on the garden. I am local to MK , and Jason has been to my house, so when we are off lockdown if you want to visit and see it talk about it then just PM me.
 

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When we moved here I connected up one of our toilets to some water butts (400litres) for flushing the loo.

In total, we now have water butts holding up to 2,500 litres of water, that can be used to top up the loo water butts. We have a water butt pump that is very useful for transferring water, watering the garden or for using rain water with the pressure washer.

The other loo is still on mains water, but only gets used if we run out of collected rainwater or if we need to use both loos at the same time.

Our ducks also need fresh water each day so it also helps if the stream running through the garden dries up.

Usual mains water usage is less than 2m3 per month (24m3/year).

The only times it goes up is if we have no rain for over a month (but that has only happened twice in 5 years as we live in Wales!)
 

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Any pictures would be appreciated!
 

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A cheap water butt you can cut into your rain-pipe from the roof is a simple and nice way to get some water storage in place. As mentioned, you can then fill a bucket and chuck it down a toilet for flush (which you can do any time, of course, if you want to save on water costs and reduce water-processing impact, etc.).

Also, I would not be against drinking 'butt water' (achem!) in an emergency, but keep a bottle of Milton fluid (sodium hypochlorite) handy. By adding a certain concentration for a day or so, it kills everything and then turns into salt. The reason for a delay in then drinking it is that dead stuff will then settle out, either by flotation or settlement, you can then probably safely drink the clean stuff in the middle.
 

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There are plenty of places in the world where people still use natural water sources whether it’s well water or rain water tanks. There’s an industry to support this.
The standardised filters and housings are relatively common.
I picked up a 10 inch filter housing and a 1um filter for less than £30 from an Irish company a year ago.
You’ll also see these housings and fittings in industrial settings and as pre filters on e.g. lab water systems. They’re relatively easy to source.

You definitely need to take care with anything you consider drinking.

I took to keeping some bottled water a few years ago when our water main burst repeatedly. Having 20 litres of drinking water available made a day without water much more bearable.
 

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When I was in the Sappers, water supply was one of our roles. To provide potable water, our first job was to fill a large tank and cover it with Keiselguhr/Diatomaceous Earth and let that settle in the tank, pulling all the large debris down with it. We were told to leave it 8 hours to settle before treating it with chlorine. After a short while, it was deemed fit to drink. As a concurrent activity, we setup pumps with filters using the same material, and started filling separate tanks. It will probably have changed in the 30 years since I left, but the principle remains the same.

The water for our courtyard of houses comes from a shared borehole at the end of our drive. We pay Yorkshire Water a grand total of £5 per house per year for the right to extract water from our borehole. But then we pay £500+ every time the submersible pump breaks down and needs replacing. It pumps straight out of a limestone aquifer, the same one that the breweries use in the nearby town, and has no filtration. It is as hard as nails though
 
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When I was in the Sappers, water supply was one of our roles. To provide potable water, our first job was to fill a large tank and cover it with Keiselguhr/Diatomaceous Earth and let that settle in the tank, pulling all the large debris down with it. We were told to leave it 8 hours to settle before treating it with chlorine. After a short while, it was deemed fit to drink. As a concurrent activity, we setup pumps with filters using the same material, and started filling separate tanks. It will probably have changed in the 30 years since I left, but the principle remains the same.

The water for our courtyard of houses comes from a shared borehole at the end of our drive. We pay Yorkshire Water a grand total of £5 per house per year for the right to extract water from our borehole. But then we pay £500+ every time the submersible pump breaks down and needs replacing. It pumps straight out of a limestone aquifer, the same one that the breweries use in the nearby town, and has no filtration. It is as hard as nails though
I grew up on a farm. We had water from a borehole. No chlorine but heaps of chalk.
I also remember days and weeks when the pump broke...
Still equipment failure aside we had water even in the most extreme drought conditions.
 

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Hi, I'm blessed to live in a country with abundant piped water supplies, even in dry summers. I still harvest a little amount of rain water, just for the birdbath and garden.

For emergency supplies for drinking, I keep about 10 2 litre plastic bottles in the basement.

A few years ago, when there was some power issues that could affect water treatment / pumping we keep some addition large buckets outside filled with water for loo flushing.

Anyone else do stuff like this?
What !!!
 
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