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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had this random idea - maybe it already exists but I've never seen it.

It seems like every (non-tethered) home chargepoint is a box with the socket mounted on it. Even small units like the EO Mini are still quite a chunky thing to mount on an outside wall if it's in a conspicuous place.

So why not separate the box from the socket? A low profile, or in-wall flush mounted socket, which would be significantly more discreet ( when not plugged in).
This would then cabled to a remotely mounted unit containing the EVSE electronics - this could perhaps be a DIN rail module, which could go either in its own box, or inside the consumer unit if space allows.
 

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So I had this random idea - maybe it already exists but I've never seen it.

It seems like every (non-tethered) home chargepoint is a box with the socket mounted on it. Even small units like the EO Mini are still quite a chunky thing to mount on an outside wall if it's in a conspicuous place.

So why not separate the box from the socket? A low profile, or in-wall flush mounted socket, which would be significantly more discreet ( when not plugged in).
This would then cabled to a remotely mounted unit containing the EVSE electronics - this could perhaps be a DIN rail module, which could go either in its own box, or inside the consumer unit if space allows.
Nice idea - the box but could easily sit inside a miniature consumer unit in the garage, for example. Wonder if anyone does a locking flap that could weatherproof the socket? Would be more of a permanent installation and potentially take longer to fit as would need a biggish hole in the wall to recess the socket, though.
 

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So I had this random idea - maybe it already exists but I've never seen it.

It seems like every (non-tethered) home chargepoint is a box with the socket mounted on it. Even small units like the EO Mini are still quite a chunky thing to mount on an outside wall if it's in a conspicuous place.

So why not separate the box from the socket? A low profile, or in-wall flush mounted socket, which would be significantly more discreet ( when not plugged in).
This would then cabled to a remotely mounted unit containing the EVSE electronics - this could perhaps be a DIN rail module, which could go either in its own box, or inside the consumer unit if space allows.
Nothing stopping anyone doing this today. All component parts are readily available.
 

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OLEV/OZEV grant distorting the market again. ;)

It would be a good idea from a security perspective - less on show to be stolen. I might get my core drill out at the weekend and modify my installation if the wires on the socket are long enough.
 

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The sockets are themselves considerably more bulky than a regular outside socket, especially if they have the latch mechanism to prevent 'accidental' disconnection. I'd say they're typically more than a regular housebrick deep. Chunkiest bits of the innards will be the contactor (which gets hot), and RCBO or equivalent; some units (e.g. podpoint) use chunky PCB mounted relays and have the high current path going through a PCB.
There's also cooling to think about. You don't want the hot parts of the board getting too cozy with cavity wall insulation.
 

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The sockets and motorised latches aren't ridiculously large but I take your point about the heat:

142575
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The sockets are themselves considerably more bulky than a regular outside socket, especially if they have the latch mechanism to prevent 'accidental' disconnection. I'd say they're typically more than a regular housebrick deep. Chunkiest bits of the innards will be the contactor (which gets hot), and RCBO or equivalent; some units (e.g. podpoint) use chunky PCB mounted relays and have the high current path going through a PCB.
There's also cooling to think about. You don't want the hot parts of the board getting too cozy with cavity wall insulation.
Nothing stopping anyone doing this today. All component parts are readily available.
Of course, though neatly sealing the back of the socket would be best done with a purpose-designed moulding
I was thinking something like this, with a sealed rear-end, or a small flanged rear box/mounting plate. No dims but looks like it would fit in a 1-brick depth.
142576
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The sockets are themselves considerably more bulky than a regular outside socket, especially if they have the latch mechanism to prevent 'accidental' disconnection. I'd say they're typically more than a regular housebrick deep. Chunkiest bits of the innards will be the contactor (which gets hot), and RCBO or equivalent; some units (e.g. podpoint) use chunky PCB mounted relays and have the high current path going through a PCB.
There's also cooling to think about. You don't want the hot parts of the board getting too cozy with cavity wall insulation.
But all that would be in the remote box. Some EVSEs use latching relays to avoid a hot contactor coil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Look no further; Ladestasjon med type 2 uttak - Besen Group AS

Sent fra min SM-G960F via Tapatalk
Yes, though not clear how big the socket housing is, or if the cable can easily be detatched to feed throug a wall

Looks like this Chinese unit
 

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Looks a fearful bodge to cheaply allow a type 2 socket in a separate enclosure of similar size to an AO mini as an alternative to a tethered lead.



If the lead is only 20 cm long and feeds the top of the socket enclosure it's far from ideal and unlikely to go through a typical UK double skinned brick and block wall even if it is possible to detach.
 

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I think this sort of thing could suit some people:

Placing an EVSE in a recessed meter box would make it less obvious it's an EVSE charger. Might need a small cut out in the lid for the cable to go through whilst in use, but that's easily done.

Im planning something similar to go on the front of the house.
 

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For some of the smaller chargepoints it's actually the cable, plug and cable holder that takes up more space than the charge point itself. I've had a Wallbox Pulsar Plus installed recently and it's very discreet (other than the very bright LEDS) in terms of size of the unit itself.

There seems to be a trend amongst some manufacturers to make the unit as large as possible for some reason, e.g. Zappi, and Anderson etc. Anderson for example seem to be so worried about trying to make their unit stylish by offering available a huge range of colours and finishes, that they've not realised that if you make the unit much smaller and discreet you don't actually need something that looks like you've bolted a suitcase to the front wall of your house.
 

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So why not separate the box from the socket? A low profile, or in-wall flush mounted socket, which would be significantly more discreet ( when not plugged in).
I suspect it isn't common because not all properties have a suitable location for the separate controls cabinet and it complicates the installation somewhat, but I think it's a good idea. Better to keep the contactor, MCB and controls inside a garage or somewhere dry, than out in box exposed to the rain and humidity.

The other version of this idea, is a cabled product with just the charging cable emerging from a connection on the wall, possibly with a small, flush control panel. With the cable seperate from the controls, there's no reason why it needs to be anchored at waist height, you could anchor it above head height allowing it to reach over and down to the car, bit like a petrol pump avoiding the mess and trip hazard of cables lying around on the ground.
 

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iD.3 Family, Stonewashed Blue, Heatpump, Ankoya Alloys.
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There seems to be a trend amongst some manufacturers to make the unit as large as possible for some reason, e.g. Zappi, and Anderson etc. Anderson for example seem to be so worried about trying to make their unit stylish by offering available a huge range of colours and finishes, that they've not realised that if you make the unit much smaller and discreet you don't actually need something that looks like you've bolted a suitcase to the front wall of your house.
The Andersen is the size it is because it allows the cable to be completely hidden out of sight. If you want an untethered box then it can be small, if you want a tethered box then it has to have the ability to either hide the cable (like the Andersen), or have the cable wrapped around it.
 

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I cannot remember where I saw it but on one of the other electric car sites a member had made a laser cut steel box that looked from the outside like the sign for his house. It had been powder coated to match the house and had a door on the front to give access to the cable and plug. This sort of fabrication should not be that expensive to produce and would be even cheaper if someone was to make a standard basic box that customers could customise with whatever pattern name or number they wanted on the front. CNC machines make this sort of customisation a great deal more affordable now we had a sign made for our house a couple of years ago by a local CNC place and it was surprisingly cheap for what we got. I very much like the idea of being able to stow away the cable and plug out of sight somewhere and having a bit of additional weather protection for the charger seems like a good idea. Just need to find a way to keep the spiders out.

Now that hobby level CNC machines seem to be becoming far more affordable I wonder if something like this could be a viable hobby business if there was enough demand? There has been a few times when I have wondered about getting a cheap CNC plasma cutter and I have a mate that has been really impressed with a hobby type powder coating system he bought. If my welding was a bit neater I could be tempted to see whether it might be a viable sort of retirement hobby business as I bet there are a few people around who would like their chargers to look a bit more in keeping with their house rather than something just screwed on as an afterthought.
 
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