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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have range loss information - anecdotal is fine - from fitting winter tyres to either a Leaf 40 or 62 please?

Previously I used all season tyres on an Outlander and liked them. Great in the snow and summer and because it was an un-aerodynamic vehicle with a small PHEV battery, range loss was negligible. I'm interested in getting winters fitted for the Leaf, but maybe not if there's much loss to the battery range.

This topic has broadly been covered before on here, but more with reference to such as tyre pressure monitoring issues of changing wheels and legalities over different wheel sizes. I understand the wider arguments of winter tyres or not; it's just the range implications I'd like to understand more about. Thanks.
 

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Whilst not on a Leaf, or indeed a full winter tyre, I found zero difference in efficiency between the factory summer Bridgestone Turanza’s and a set of Michelin Cross Climate’s on the e-Golf.

Not sure where you are in the UK, but I think the Cross Climate is an ideal ‘winter’ tyre for our climate. It doesn’t give too much away in the snow versus a full winter tyre, but is good also when the roads dry up or indeed when it’s cold and wet, which is a lot of the time.
 

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If you mean a proper winter tyre then go carefully because as i understand it they are great at <2-3C but if road temp goes above then watch out and wear rate greatly increases. Need to research that i suggest.
 

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I have full winters on my leaf 40 I loose about 10 - 20% range on the motorway it's difficult to figure out how much of that is down to the cold or the tyres but the better wet grip outweighs the losses in winter compared to the eco tyres in the summer. I have two sets of wheels both the same size.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have full winters on my leaf 40 I loose about 10 - 20% range on the motorway it's difficult to figure out how much of that is down to the cold or the tyres but the better wet grip outweighs the losses in winter compared to the eco tyres in the summer. I have two sets of wheels both the same size.

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Thank you. I've got a set of winter tyres on order, due to be fitted early next week. One interesting thing I came across (though possibly not interesting really...) is that whenever I entered my registration on various tyre websites, it recognised I have a 62 Leaf yet recommended a completely different size tyre to the ones I have fitted. By different I mean different rim size even. I've seen the 16" 17" wheel rim difference mentioned for different trim levels on the 24/30 Leafs but this 'error' surprised me for my model. I was glad I double checked before buying.
 

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Winter tyres? I hear a lot about them but have never seen any, used any and neither can I think of a reason for having them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Winter tyres? I hear a lot about them but have never seen any, used any and neither can I think of a reason for having them.
In the frozen north (County Durham) @EdH, my daily commute takes me on some rural roads and the motorway and previously a deeper tread tyre has proven useful in the snow as well as just being reassuring. Plenty of room on the EV broom though; I have similar reservations about the need for fog lights, for example.

I've had the winter tyres on for a week now. The cold snap has affected range too, but I'd say a loss of 10-15% feels about right.
 

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Front wheel drive cars manage pretty well in snow and I have driven in snow every time we get any. Never had any problems with normal tyres. Watching other cars though, its the rear wheel drive cars that have trouble even in a few cm.
 

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I tried winter tyres a number of years ago & it's one of those things you have to experience to fully appreciate the advantage they give over summer tyres, just google it & see what results are for stopping distances etc, it could be the one thing that avoids an accident or just keeps you going when others get stuck...
 

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Front wheel drive cars manage pretty well in snow and I have driven in snow every time we get any. Never had any problems with normal tyres. Watching other cars though, its the rear wheel drive cars that have trouble even in a few cm.
You should try a set, it makes quite a difference for most of the winter season and for the occasional times we get snow the improvement in grip is quite surprising. I'm now using cross climates as we get very little snow and they seem to be working well.
 

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You should try a set, it makes quite a difference for most of the winter season and for the occasional times we get snow the improvement in grip is quite surprising. I'm now using cross climates as we get very little snow and they seem to be working well.
Must be the way some people drive. All you need to do is drive a lot slower and leave bigger distances between cars and begin slowing earlier. I have never had a problem with driving in snow with the tyres that came with the car and the Leaf is particularly good. BMW drivers seem to have a lot more trouble.
 

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Must be the way some people drive. All you need to do is drive a lot slower and leave bigger distances between cars and begin slowing earlier.
There are only a limited number of ways to drive up a hill. I've driven Land Rovers with all-season tyres through atrocious conditions where normal cars with normal tyres get stuck immediately due to the diff making them one-wheel drive and failing as soon as they hit an ice patch.

I used to have a big Merc E-Class estate: heavy RWD automatic that should be terrible in snow, and it was with standard tyres. I fitted it with Vredestein Quatrac 3s — a proper "three peaks and snowflake"-marked all-season like the CrossClimate — and the difference was night and day. Could easily tackle conditions like this (I'm not slithering, but being indecisive; and no, I don't break traffic rules if you look again):

 

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Yup, thats the way to do it, drive slowly and cautiously. 4 WD and particularly land rovers were excellent at going up hills in the snow, but for most people if there's a lot of snow then its best to postpone your journey.
 

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drive slowly and cautiously
Agreed, even in competent four-wheel drive cars. Their ability to get going can easily lull you into a false sense of security, from which you get rudely awakened when you need to steer or stop suddenly on an icy surface, where you find that the extra momentum of the heavier vehicle is a distinct disadvantage.
 

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I have put cross climates on a Leaf 40 and a Zoe 40. Didn't notice any difference to be honest. They work all year round. Grip is loads better. Only reduced efficiency is due to extra ability to hoon...
I changed my Leaf Tekna from factory Dunlops to CrossClimate+ in September.

I tried to do an averaged consumption figure for the week before and the week after changing them on my daily commute and got 3.9 miles/kWh vs 4.0 miles/kWh. So in terms of efficiency there was probably a slight drop however due to the resolution in the miles/kWh figure we're talking 2.5% +/- 2.5%, eg the true loss could be anywhere from nothing to 5%. So on a Leaf 30 you might be looking at a 0-5 mile range loss, but I'd say the loss is probably only a couple of miles, so nothing really to worry about.

In terms of performance, dry summer grip is better than the Dunlops despite being an all season tyre, wet/cold grip is WAAAAAY better than the Dunlops, it's in a totally different league. I went from wheel spin just trying to get away from the traffic lights at a modest speed on a wet road to being able to floor it in the wet without wheelspin. Braking in the wet that would cause lots of ABS action on the Dunlops stops quickly and safely on the CrossClimate+ without any ABS chatter. The car corners in the wet as if the road was dry. Super impressed with the wet grip of the CrossClimate+ and even down near freezing there is no loss in grip that I can notice, dry or wet.

I've only had two days of proper ice and snow so far - as expected they work well on a couple of inches of snow, comparably to the Vredestein Quatrac 5 I had on a previous car however ice was a nice surprise - I was actually able to drive up hill safely on a road that was mostly black ice without the car squirming or sliding sideways. It wasn't until I got out and tried to stand on the road I'd just been driving on and found I couldn't stand on it did I realise how bad the road was. As we get a lot of black ice on a certain stretch of road during our commute I will keep an eye on this but so far I'm pleased with the ice and snow performance.

That's the good stuff. Now for the bad.

They ride a lot harsher than the factory Dunlops. If you care about ride quality and are used to cars that ride well (as I am) you might be a bit disappointed. Contrary to popular opinion on here, the Leaf is not a particularly smooth riding car to begin with, but is acceptable with the soft Dunlops but with the CrossClimate+ you'll feel every little ridge and step in the road let alone pothole. It's bad enough that I initially regretted my purchase (And I'm still considering getting a set of Acenta wheels to put softer riding summer tyres on for summer use) but I've dropped the pressure down to about 33/34 to make it a bit more palatable, and I also find they ride better in cold weather than they did in hot summer weather.

I suspect the reason for harsher ride is that the sidewalls are really stiff due to the 95 XL load rating vs a 91 load rating for the original tyres. Unfortunately a lot of all season tyres are only available in XL load ratings, so this is probably an issue on many all season tyres - at least until manufacturers start producing non-XL variants.

The other negative point of the CrossClimate+ is that they're a bit noisy. But not in a normal low frequency "tyre roar" way. Tyre roar is actually quite low but they make unusual noises of their own. During hard acceleration they make a "hissing" noise. You wouldn't even hear this "hiss" under acceleration on an ICE vehicle as the engine would drown it out but you certainly do on an EV, especially compared to the silent Dunlops.

This is actually quite common with winter and some all season tyres, (The Vredestein Quatrac 5 I had on the Ion used to hiss a bit under acceleration too) but these take it to the next level - it is very obvious every time you put your foot down. It will be due to the "mobile" tread blocks sliding against each other under torsional load since there's no circumferential stabiliser rings like there is with a summer tread pattern to stop the tread blocks twisting in the rotational direction.

The other odd noise they make is that there is a just audible "buzzing" noise that you can hear when you're doing around 60mph on a smooth dry motorway. Hard to describe and easily missed, but it is there, and supposedly is an artefact of the V tread pattern and may be noticeable on other winter tyres with V tread patterns.

The noises the tyres make can easily be overlooked but the harsher ride is harder to overlook. If you're someone who is used to driving harsh riding sporty cars with low profile tyres you'll probably find the ride perfectly acceptable or perhaps even better than you're used to, but if you're used to cars with higher profile tyres and softer suspension you might find the ride a bit harsh.

For me, they would be the perfect all year round tyre if they would just release a 91V variant which does not have XL rated reinforced sidewalls... 😕 However nearly all all season tyres on sale at the moment are XL rated in most sizes, so it seems to be an industry trend.
 

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Must be the way some people drive. All you need to do is drive a lot slower and leave bigger distances between cars and begin slowing earlier. I have never had a problem with driving in snow with the tyres that came with the car and the Leaf is particularly good. BMW drivers seem to have a lot more trouble.
Yup, thats the way to do it, drive slowly and cautiously. 4 WD and particularly land rovers were excellent at going up hills in the snow, but for most people if there's a lot of snow then its best to postpone your journey.
Pay particular attention to the stopping distances both on the flat and downhill in that video. Keeping back from the car in front of you doesn't help if a pedestrian steps out into the gap and in the case of downhill you might not be able to stop at all until you reach the bottom..

One good thing about FWD with proper winter or all season tyres vs AWD with summer tyres is that the first gives you a good safety margin between braking traction and driving traction - because you can brake a lot better (4 wheels) than you can drive (2 wheels) its harder to get yourself into trouble. With AWD with more driving traction available you can get moving in situations where you can't stop safely especially on summer tyres.
 
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