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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.

I am heading off for a few days next week in a loaner M3 (SR+), and have been sussing out local (to my destination) charging opportunities, specifically Rapids.

Having looked at a few check-in comments on Zap-Map and PlugShare, it appears to be a common occurence that M3s attempting to charge are met with an 'unable to identify vehicle' error.

What is the general experience of M3 drivers here? Am I likely to find that a good number of Rapids are not compatible?

Thanks.
 

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All CCS rapids work fine with the Model 3, although the chargers themselves aren't as reliable as Superchargers, or as easy to use. Superchargers have to be the first choice, as they are reliable and just work.
 

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Ampera aka IGOR
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Some of the older rapids north of the border can be troublesome with the M3. One of the reasons given by the manufacturer is that the signal from the post is at the upper end of the limit and can be affected by a 'noisy' connection. To try and avoid this is to hold the back of the charger plug upwards initially when plugged in to get a better connection on the signal pins, once it has started it should be fine.
 

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For me it's

Plan A: find a Supercharger (only ever found 1 broken unit, just had to swap to one of the other 15 bays)
Plan B: find an Instavolt site (never had an issue)

Not sure what my plan C would be as I've not needed it thus far. What's the most reliable network outside of those 2? Cost is not really relevant to me as its fairly infrequent that I charge away from home outside the Supercharger network...I just want it to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All CCS rapids work fine with the Model 3, although the chargers themselves aren't as reliable as Superchargers, or as easy to use. Superchargers have to be the first choice, as they are reliable and just work.
Plan A: find a Supercharger (only ever found 1 broken unit, just had to swap to one of the other 15 bays)
Unfortunately I'm headed to mid-Wales and there's not a supercharger anywhere in sight. :cry:
 

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For me it's

Plan A: find a Supercharger (only ever found 1 broken unit, just had to swap to one of the other 15 bays)
Plan B: find an Instavolt site (never had an issue)

Not sure what my plan C would be as I've not needed it thus far. What's the most reliable network outside of those 2? Cost is not really relevant to me as its fairly infrequent that I charge away from home outside the Supercharger network...I just want it to work.
I'm relying on anecdotal evidence (I've only had to use public chargers once so far) but Ionity and Osprey seem to be the next best after Tesla and Instavolt.
 

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Some of the older rapids north of the border can be troublesome with the M3. One of the reasons given by the manufacturer is that the signal from the post is at the upper end of the limit and can be affected by a 'noisy' connection. To try and avoid this is to hold the back of the charger plug upwards initially when plugged in to get a better connection on the signal pins, once it has started it should be fine.
CCS uses Comms over power: there are no signal pins.
 

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Both the PP and CP pins can be used on a rapid, which is why they are both present on the top part of a CCS connector. Basic Signalling (BS) uses a similar PWM protocol on the CP as for AC charging and is used initially to detect that the vehicle is connected and that the PE is OK. The charger and vehicle then switches to High level Communication (HLC) using a high frequency PLC signal, again using the CP. True power line signalling, over the DC conductors, is, I believe, specific to Tesla Superchargers that use the US-style connector (not 100% sure about this, as I don't have any documents about it).
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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Both the PP and CP pins can be used on a rapid, which is why they are both present on the top part of a CCS connector. Basic Signalling (BS) uses a similar PWM protocol on the CP as for AC charging and is used initially to detect that the vehicle is connected and that the PE is OK. The charger and vehicle then switches to High level Communication (HLC) using a high frequency PLC signal, again using the CP. True power line signalling, over the DC conductors, is, I believe, specific to Tesla Superchargers that use the US-style connector (not 100% sure about this, as I don't have any documents about it).
Yes, you're right I was wrong, HLC via the CP, not power line.
I can't find info on what data is sent each way when/if HLC is used.
 

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Tesla Model 3 LR AWD, Renault ZOE R135 ZE50 GTLine (Sold: R90 ZE40 i Dynamic Nav)
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Unfortunately I'm headed to mid-Wales and there's not a supercharger anywhere in sight.
We have a ZOE as well as a Model 3, so use CCS chargers in mid Wales. I'd try to stick to:
  • 50 kW PodPoint at Tesco in Newtown.
  • 50 kW PodPoint at Tesco in Aberystwyth.
  • 50 kW GeniePoint at Morrisons in Aberystwyth.
  • 50 kW GeniePoint at Morrisons in Brecon.
I don't try the BP Pulse chargers any more.

There are more along the south and north coasts and along the English border.

Of course, there's supposed to be a Supercharger site in Aberystwyth, with installation complete in Q2 2021. That will help us a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We have a ZOE as well as a Model 3, so use CCS chargers in mid Wales. I'd try to stick to:
  • 50 kW PodPoint at Tesco in Newtown.
  • 50 kW PodPoint at Tesco in Aberystwyth.
  • 50 kW GeniePoint at Morrisons in Aberystwyth.
  • 50 kW GeniePoint at Morrisons in Brecon.
Thanks.

We’ll be staying near Llandrindod Wells, which has a rapid that purportedly has this compatibility issue. There are a few AC posts also, but I was hoping to avoid having to sit on one of those for very long.
 

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Both the PP and CP pins can be used on a rapid, which is why they are both present on the top part of a CCS connector. Basic Signalling (BS) uses a similar PWM protocol on the CP as for AC charging and is used initially to detect that the vehicle is connected and that the PE is OK. The charger and vehicle then switches to High level Communication (HLC) using a high frequency PLC signal, again using the CP. True power line signalling, over the DC conductors, is, I believe, specific to Tesla Superchargers that use the US-style connector (not 100% sure about this, as I don't have any documents about it).
Also HPC can be / is specified under CCS for AC charging.

There's something wrong with the physical specifications that in-service mated plugs/sockets need external pressure applied in order to correct communication problems (yuk!)
 
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