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Cupra Born
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Decided to test the Born on our first day with it at the local Osprey, it was on around 40% so took the opportunity to grab a pint and see how it performed. 99% of our charging is at home so I was surprised at the £24 bill! Certainly getting an expensive way to travel if you rely on public charging
 

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Decided to test the Born on our first day with it at the local Osprey, it was on around 40% so took the opportunity to grab a pint and see how it performed. 99% of our charging is at home so I was surprised at the £24 bill! Certainly getting an expensive way to travel if you rely on public charging
Osprey are one of the most expensive public chargers out there, there are cheaper but public EV charging is going to be a lot more expensive than fossel fuel, prices have been rising steadily over the last couple of years and I don't see this stopping any time soon.
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV60
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Decided to test the Born on our first day with it at the local Osprey, it was on around 40% so took the opportunity to grab a pint and see how it performed. 99% of our charging is at home so I was surprised at the £24 bill! Certainly getting an expensive way to travel if you rely on public charging
You deffo need to look on the various subscriptions if you want lower prices
Seat should offer one via Elli - quite typical the dealer isn't telling anything nowadays :(
 

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Public rapid charging has become a premium service and will probably remain so. It's not easy to see a solution unless you can charge at home on a cheap rate. The sort of good news is that it may start car manufacturers having to think seriously about efficiency.
 

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Osprey are one of the most expensive public chargers out there
Looking at PAYG rates on nationwide networks, MFG and Shell Recharge fees are the same, while InstaVolt, Fastned and GeniePoint (daytime rate) are only slightly lower.

Regular users can get discounted rates subscriptions either directly with some of the networks or with aggregators such as Elli, Bonnet, or Octopus Electric Universe.
 
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Osprey are one of the most expensive public chargers out there, there are cheaper but public EV charging is going to be a lot more expensive than fossel fuel, prices have been rising steadily over the last couple of years and I don't see this stopping any time soon.
There's really no reason public charging should be more expensive than fossil fuels in the long run.

The problem is the early stage investors want profitable public charging but that isn't compatible with large build out. So they have to charge a large margin per kWh to pay for the next charger and the one after that.

The other issue is occupancy is relatively low, and the units cost a lot to install, so their payback time is longer than ideal. This varies across the network.

In the long run both should improve - networks will reach steady-state capacity levels and occupancy will increase. At the same time competition will drive prices down.

It's essential for democratic access to electric vehicles that charging costs be kept reasonable, at least around that of the cost of petrol, but ideally lower. Not everyone will have a drive to charge their EV on 10p/kWh electric.
 

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Ioniq 28kWh
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Not everyone will have a drive to charge their EV on 10p/kWh electric.
Not everyone has 10p/kWh electricty, even Intelligent Octopus at 10p/kWh then charges 41.64p/kWh during the day, so only useful if you are driving a lot or have house batteries, otherwise it is more like 33p/kWh.

Night rate (23:30 - 05:30):
10p / kWh
Day rate (05:30 - 23:30):
41.64p / kWh
 

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Not everyone has 10p/kWh electricty, even Intelligent Octopus at 10p/kWh then charges 41.64p/kWh during the day, so only useful if you are driving a lot or have house batteries, otherwise it is more like 33p/kWh.
Right, but if you have a driveway you can charge on cheap electricity at night. Not everyone will do this but I would take a punt that most EV drivers with a driveway will do so unless they have very high peak time usage.

How do you provide similar benefits of EV's to those with public charging? Even AC charging. I think it needs to have an answer.
 

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Cupra Born
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I do have access to charge at home but being old housing stock with a meter under the stairs I'm unable to have a smart meter (can someone explain why??) so have a flat rate electricity charge. I would love to benefit from a cheap night rate......
 

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Decided to test the Born on our first day with it at the local Osprey, it was on around 40% so took the opportunity to grab a pint and see how it performed. 99% of our charging is at home so I was surprised at the £24 bill! Certainly getting an expensive way to travel if you rely on public charging
...but driving electric, even if you always charge at fast chargers, is still much cheaper than driving ICE the same distance. At least if I look at the Swedish prices.
 

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...but driving electric, even if you always charge at fast chargers, is still much cheaper than driving ICE the same distance. At least if I look at the Swedish prices.
Not in the UK now, it’s roughly comparable.

How do you provide similar benefits of EV's to those with public charging? Even AC charging
Got to be lamppost charging, surely? Lights are much lower power than they were, so the wiring would probably support it, or could be adapted reasonably cheaply? The key thing is to do away with any need for apps or cards - just make them dumb plugs, with very little to go wrong. Then control access by parking restrictions as is common in residential roads; you need to pay a flat monthly fee priced in the basis that you are charging most nights, or buy 24 hour displable permits in books of 20 or so. Yes, you’d need to pay for some parking wardens to work at night, but only enough to do occasional spot checks, and they would probably pay for themselves with the fines.
 

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Got to be lamppost charging, surely? Lights are much lower power than they were, so the wiring would probably support it, or could be adapted reasonably cheaply? The key thing is to do away with any need for apps or cards - just make them dumb plugs, with very little to go wrong. Then control access by parking restrictions as is common in residential roads; you need to pay a flat monthly fee priced in the basis that you are charging most nights, or buy 24 hour displable permits in books of 20 or so. Yes, you’d need to pay for some parking wardens to work at night, but only enough to do occasional spot checks, and they would probably pay for themselves with the fines.
I think you have to charge for energy rather than parking otherwise you end up subsidising the people who do 150 miles a day with people who only drive to church every Sunday.

Agreed lamp-posts are a likely solution, also would need to have some post chargers in some areas where parking density is particularly high.
 

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I do have access to charge at home but being old housing stock with a meter under the stairs I'm unable to have a smart meter (can someone explain why??) so have a flat rate electricity charge. I would love to benefit from a cheap night rate......
Dont need a 'smart' meter for Economy 7 or whatever your supplier calls it (mine is EV rate or something).It's simply a dual /clock meter .
 
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